(navigation image)
Home American Libraries | Canadian Libraries | Universal Library | Community Texts | Project Gutenberg | Children's Library | Biodiversity Heritage Library | Additional Collections
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload
See other formats

Full text of "Annual report of the Metropolitan Water and Sewerage Board"

3 9999 06544 648 4 



mMifflS I! i 



W.\ 



i 



r^ 



£ 



>N° 



I 4AJ.33 



a 





G-ive n By 



uaj^ym 




{^hrr^J^ 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 
in 2013 



http://archive.org/details/annualreportofm141914mass 



Public Document 



No. 57 



FOURTEENTH ANNUAL REPORT 



OF THE 



Metropolitan Water and 
Sewerage Board. 



For the Year 1914. 



n ' > > ' «• » 

> ,' 

1 i) ■' •> , • 



> > 



• a 



t 9 




e/ 

BOSTON: 

WRIGHT & POTTER PRINTING CO., STATE PRINTERS, 

32 DERNE STREET. 

1915. 



^k 1 - ,.2si 



Approved by 
The State Board of Publication, 



U>Jt/Uty£ 



■ 



Q 






,.« • « . , • . 



* >'■ « 






» <- ..■• t , w « t 



CONTENTS. 



District and to Water 



I. Organization and Administration, 
Board, Officers and Employees, 
II. Metropolitan Water District, 

III. Metropolitan Water Works — Construction 

IV. Water Works — Maintenance, . 

(1) Storage Reservoirs, . . . 

(2) Aqueducts, . . . . 

(3) Pumping Stations, . 

(4) Pipe Lines, .... 

(5) Protection of the Water Supply, 

(6) Clinton Sewerage Works, . 

(7) Forestry, .... 

(8) Wachusett Power Plant, . 

(9) Rainfall and Water Supply, 
(10) Water Consumption, 

V. Water Works — Financial Statement, 

(1) Water Loans — Receipts and Payments, 

(2) Total Water Debt, December 31, 1914, 

(3) Metropolitan Water Loan and Sinking Fund, 

(4) Water Assessment, 1914, . 

(5) Supplying Water to Cities and Towns outside of 

(6) Expenditures for the Different Works, 

(7) Detailed Financial Statement under Metropolitan Water Act 

(a) Expenditures and Disbursements, 

(b) Receipts, 

(c) Assets, ..... 

(d) Liabilities, .... 
VI. Metropolitan Sewerage Works, . 

(1) North Metropolitan Sewerage System — Construction, 
North Metropolitan Sewerage System — Maintenance, 

Sewers and Pumping Stations, .... 
South Metropolitan Sewerage System — Construction, 
South Metropolitan Sewerage System — Maintenance, 

Sewers and Pumping Stations, 
VII. Sewerage Works — Financial Statement, 

(1) Metropolitan Sewerage Loans, Receipts and Payments 

North Metropolitan System, . 
- South Metropolitan System, . 
Total Sewerage Debt, December 31, 1914, 

North Metropolitan System, . 

South Metropolitan System, . 
North and South Metropolitan Loan and Sinking Funds, December 31, 1914, 
Annual Appropriations, Receipts and Expenditures, 
Sewer Assessments, 1914, 
Expenditures for the Different Works, 
Detailed Financial Statement, . 

(a) Expenditures and Disbursements, 

(6) Receipts, .... 

(c) Assets, ..... 

(d) Liabilities, .... 
VIII. Recommendations for Legislation, 



(2) 

(3) 
(4) 



(2) 



(3) 
(4) 
(5) 
(6) 

(7) 



Companies, 



IV 



CONTENTS. 



Report of Chief Engineer of Water Works, 
Organization, . . . . . 

Construction, ....... 

Water Pipe Tunnel under Chelsea Creek, 
Additional 24-inch Main in Milton and Quincy, 
New High-service Reservoir and Force Main, . 
Sixty-inch Supply Main from the Weston Aqueduct, 
Sale of Power at the Sudbury Dam, 
Payment by City of Worcester for Taking of Water from Wachusett Watershed, 
Maintenance, .... 

Rainfall and Yield of Watersheds, 
Storage Reservoirs, 

Wachusett Reservoir, 

Wachusett Dam, 

Sudbury Reservoir, 

Framingham Reservoirs Nos. 1, 2 and 3, 

Miscellaneous Work in Cedar Swamp, 

Ashland, Hopkinton and Whitehall Reservoirs, 

Farm Pond, ...... 

Lake Cochituate, ..... 

Sources from which Water for the Supply of the Metropolitan District has been taken 
Aqueducts, . 

Wachusett, . 
Sudbury, 
Cochituate, . 
Weston, 
Pumping Stations, 
Chestnut Hill, 
Spot Pond, . 
■ Arlington, 
Hyde Park, . 
Consumption of Water, ..... 

Metering of Service Pipes, .... 

Water supplied Outside the Metropolitan District, . 
Quality of Water, ...... 

Sanitary Inspection, ...... 

Swamp Ditches and Brooks, .... 

Protection of the Supply by Filtration, . . . 

Forestry, ....:... 

Distributing Reservoirs, ..... 

Spot Pond, Fells and Bear Hill Reservoirs, 
Chestnut Hill Reservoir, .... 

Weston Reservoir, ..... 

Fisher Hill and Waban Hill Reservoirs, . 

Miscellaneous Structures, . • . 

Pipe Lines, . . . . . . . 

Relaying 24-inch Main on Broadway, Chelsea, 

Cleaning 24-inch Pipe Line, 

Anderson Bridge, ..... 

Connection with Lynn, .... 

Pipe Bridge over Boston & Albany Railroad, 
Breaks and Leaks, ..... 

Metering of Water to Municipalities, 

Recording Pressure Gages, . 

Electrolysis, ....... 

Clinton Sewage Disposal Works, 

Hydro-electric Power Station, 

Engineering, ...... 



CONTENTS. 



v 



Report of Engineer of Sewerage Works, . . ..'■'. 

Organization, . 

Metropolitan Sewerage Districts, . . . . 

Areas and Populations, . . . . . . 

Metropolitan Sewers, . . . . 

Sewers purchased and constructed and their Connections, 
Construction, ... . . . . • . 

North Metropolitan System, . ".. ... . 

Section 69, Winchester, . 
Section 70, Winchester and Woburn, 
Section 57a, Revere, . . ■ . ■ • 

Deer Island Outfall Extension, 
South Metropolitan System, ...... 

Section 43, Relief Outfall, Nut Island, 

Twenty-four Inch Brick Siphon Crossing, Section 70, High-level Sewer, 
Maintenance, ........ 

Scope of Work and Force employed, . . • " . 

Deer Island Pumping Station and Dwelling, . . 
East Boston Pumping Station, .... 

Charlestown Pumping Station, . . . . 

Maiden River Siphon, . . . ... 

Nut Island Station, ...... 

Drainage from Tanneries, Gelatine and Glue Works in Winchester, Woburn and 
Stoneham, . . . . . ... 

Data relating to Areas and Populations contributing Sewage to Metropolitan Sewerage 
System, ........ 

North Metropolitan System, .... 

South Metropolitan System, .... 

Whole Metropolitan System, . . 

Pumping Stations, . . . .... 

Capacity and Results, ...... 

North Metropolitan System, . '. 

Deer Island Pumping Station, '. 
East Boston Pumping Station, 
Charlestown Pumping Station, 
Alewife Brook Pumping Station, . 
South Metropolitan System, 

Ward Street Pumping Station, 
Quincy Pumping Station, 
Nut Island Screen-house, 
Quincy Sewage Lifting Station, 
Metropolitan Sewerage Outfalls, . . -. . 

Material intercepted at the Screens, .' . . 



PAGE 

86 
86 
87 
87 
87 
87 
90 
90 
90 
92 
92 
93 
93 
93 
94 
95 
95 
95 
96 
97 
97 
97 

97 

99 
99 
100 
101 
102 
102 
102 
102 
103 
105 
106 
108 
108 
109 
111 
111 
113 
114 



Appendix No. 


1.- 


Appendix No. 
Table No. 


2. - 
1 


Table No. 
Table No. 
Table No. 
Table No. 
Table No. 
Table No. 


2 
3 
4 
5 
6 
7 


Table No. 


8 


Table No. 


9 



— Contracts relating to the Metropolitan Water Works made and pending dur- 

ing the year 1914, .......... 116 

— Tables relating to the Maintenance of the Metropolitan Water Works, . 123 

— Monthly Rainfall in Inches at Various Places on the Metropolitan Water 

Works in 1914, . . . . . . . . . . 123 

— Rainfall in Inches at Jefferson, Mass., in 1914, ... . . . 124 

— Rainfall in Inches at Framingham, Mass., in 1914, ..... 125 

— Rainfall in Inches at Chestnut Hill Reservoir in 1914 126 

— Rainfall in Inches on the Wachusett Watershed, 1897 to 1914, . . . 128 

— Rainfall in Inches on the Sudbury Watershed, 1875 to 1914, . . . 129 

— Yield of the Wachusett Watershed in Gallons per Day per Square Mile 

from 1897 to 1914, 131 

— Yield of the Sudbury Watershed in Gallons per Day per Square Mile from 

1875 to 1914 133 

— Wachusett System. — Statistics of Flow of Water, Storage and Rainfall 

in 1914 136 



vi CONTENTS. 

Appendix No. 2 — Continued. page 

Table No. 10. — Sudbury System. — Statistics of Flow of Water, Storage and Rainfall in 

1914 . .137 

Table No. 11. — Cochituate System. — Statistics of Flow of Water, Storage and Rainfall 

in 1914, . . . . . . . •, • • • .138 

Table No. 12. — Elevations of Water Surfaces of Reservoirs above Boston City Base at the 

Beginning of Each Month, . . . . . . . . 139 

Table No. 13. — Sources from which and Periods during which Water has been drawn for the 

Supply of the Metropolitan Water District, ..... 140 

Table No. 14. — Average Daily Quantity of Water flowing through Aqueducts in 1914 by 

Months ■- .141 

Table No. 15. — Statement of Operation of Engines Nos. 1 and 2 at Chestnut Hill Pump- 
ing Station No. 1 for the Year 1914, 142 

Table No. 16. — Statement of Operation of Engine No. 3 at Chestnut Hill Pumping Station 

No. 1 for the Year 1914, . . . . . ... . . 143 

Table No. 17. — Statement of Operation of Engine No. 4 at Chestnut Hill Pumping Station 

No. 1 for the Year 1914, 144 

Table No. 18. — Statement of Operation of Engines Nos. 5, 6, and 7 at Chestnut Hill 

Pumping Station No. 2 for the Year 1914, ...... 145 

Table No. 19. — Statement of Operation of Engine No. 12 at Chestnut Hill Pumping 

Station No. 2 for the Year 1914, 146 

Table No. 20. — Statement of Operation of Engine No. 8 at Spot Pond Pumping Station 

for the Year 1914, . . . . . . . . 147 

Table No. 21. — Statement of Operation of Engine No. 9 at Spot Pond Pumping Station 

for the Year 1914, . . . . . . . . ."■■'. 148 

Table No. 22. — Statement of Operation of Engine No. 10 at Arlington Pumping Station 

for the Year 1914, . .149 

Table No. 23. — Statement of Operation of Engine No. 11 at Arlington Pumping Station 

for the Year 1914, 150 

Table No. 24. — Statement of Operation of Engines Nos. 13 and 14 at Hyde Park Pumping 

Station for the Year 1914, . . . . . . - . .151 

Table No. 25. — (Meter Basis) Average Daily Consumption of Water by Districts in Cities 

and Towns supplied by the Metropolitan Water Works in 1914, . . 152 

Table No. 26. — (Meter Basis) Average Daily Consumption of Water in Cities and Towns 

supplied from Metropolitan Works in 1914, ..... 153 

Table No. 27. — (Pump Basis) Consumption of Water in the Metropolitan Water District, 

as constituted in the Year 1914, and a Small Section of the Town of 

Saugus, from 1893 to 1914, . . . . . . . .156 

Table No. 28. — Chemical Examinations of Water from the Wachusett Reservoir, Clinton, 158 
Table No. 29. — Chemical Examinations of Water from the Sudbury Reservoir, . . ,159 

Table No. 30. — Chemical Examinations of Water from Spot Pond, Stoneham, . . . 160 

Table No. 31. — Chemical Examinations of Water from Lake Cochituate, . . . 161 

Table No. 32. — Chemical Examinations of Water from a Tap at the State House, Boston, 162 
Table No. 33. — Averages of Examinations of Water from Various Parts of the Metropolitan 

Water Works in 1914, 163 

Table No. 34. — Chemical Examinations of Water from a Faucet in Boston, from 1892 to 

1914, 164 

Table No. 35. — Microscopic Organisms in Water from Various Parts of the Metropolitan 

Water Works, from 1898 to 1914, inclusive, . . . . .165 

Table No. 36. — Number of Bacteria per Cubic Centimeter in Water from Various Parts of 

the Metropolitan Water Works, from 1898 to 1914, inclusive, . . 167 

Table No. 37. — Colors of Water from Various Parts of the Metropolitan Water Works in 

1914, . . . . . . ... ..:...• • -168 

Table No. 38. — Temperatures of Water from Various Parts of the Metropolitan Water . 

Works in 1914, .' " . . .169 

Table No. 39. — Temperatures of the Air at Three Stations on the Metropolitan Water 

Works in 1914, . .170 

Table No. 40. — Table showing Length of Main Lines of Water Pipes and Connections 

owned and operated by Metropolitan Water and Sewerage Board, and 

Number of Valves set in Same, Dec. 31, 1914, . . . . . 171 

Table No. 41. — Statement of Cast-iron Hydrant, Blow-off and Drain Pipes, owned and 

operated by Metropolitan Water and Sewerage Board, Dec. 31, 1914, . 172 



CONTENTS. vii 

Appendix No. 2 — Concluded. page 

Table No. 42. — Length of Water Pipes, Four Inches in Diameter and Larger, in the Several 
Cities and Towns supplied by the Metropolitan Water Works, Dec. 31, 

1914, 173 

Table No. 43. — Number of Service Pipes, Meters and Fire Hydrants in the Several Cities 

and Towns supplied by the Metropolitan Water Works, . . . 174 

Table No. 44. — Average Maximum Monthly Heights, in Feet, above Boston City Base, to 
which Water rose at Different Stations on the Metropolitan Water 

Works in 1914 . . .175 

Appendix No. 3. — Water Works Statistics for the Year 1914, ...... 177 

Appendix No. 4. — Contracts relating to the Metropolitan Sewerage Works, made and pending 

during the Year 1914, 180 

Appendix No. 5. — Financial Statement presented to the General Court on Jan. 20, 1915, . 185 



Metropolitan Water and Sewerage Board. 



To the Honorable the Senate and House of Representatives of the Commonwealth of 
Massachusetts in General Court assembled. 

The Metropolitan Water and Sewerage Board, established under 
the provisions of chapter 168 of the Acts of the year 1901, has 
already presented to your Honorable Body an abstract of the 
account of its receipts, expenditures, disbursements, assets and 
liabilities for the fiscal year ending on November 30, 1914, and 
now, in accordance with the provisions of chapter 235 of the Acts 
of the year 1906, presents a detailed statement of its doings for 
the calendar year ending on December 31, 1914, being its 

FOURTEENTH ANNUAL REPORT. 
I. ORGANIZATION AND ADMINISTRATION. 

Board, Officers and Employees. 

The term of office of Henry P. Walcott expired on March 20, 
and he was reappointed for the term of three years next succeeding. 
Mr. Henry H. Sprague resigned in January and Mr. Thomas E. 
Dwyer was appointed on January 23 for the unexpired term, ending 
March 20, 1915. Dr. Walcott was designated chairman of the 
Board. At the end of the year the Board consisted of Henry P. 
Walcott, chairman, Edward A. McLaughlin and Thomas E. Dwyer. 
William N. Davenport has continued as secretary. Alfred F. Bridg- 
man has been the purchasing agent and Miss Alice G. Mason the 
bookkeeper. 

There are also employed in the administrative office a paymaster, 
an assistant in auditing, two general clerks, three stenographers and 
clerks, a telephone operator, and a janitor with two assistants, both 
of whom act as watchmen. 

Such general conveyancing work and investigation of real estate 
titles in the different counties as have been called for during the 
year have been performed by George D. Bigelow. 



2 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

The consulting engineers of the Board are Hiram F. Mills and 
Frederic P. Stearns, who are called upon for services when matters 
arise which require their consideration. 

Dexter Brackett, Chief Engineer of the Water Works, has had 
supervision over the various departments of both construction and 
maintenance of the Water Works. William E. Foss has been As- 
sistant to the Chief Engineer. The following have also continued 
as superintendents of departments under the direction of the Chief 
Engineer: Elliot R. B. Allardice, Superintendent of the Wachusett 
Department; Charles E. Haberstroh, Superintendent of the Sudbury 
and Cochituate Works and of the portion of the Weston Aqueduct 
above the Weston Reservoir; Samuel E. Killam, Superintendent in 
charge of the Weston Reservoir and the remaining portion of the 
Weston Aqueduct, and of all reservoirs and pipe lines within the 
Metropolitan District; and Arthur E. O'Neil, Superintendent of 
the several pumping stations. 

The average engineering force employed on construction and 
maintenance during the year has included, in addition to the Chief 
Engineer, 4 department superintendents, 2 division engineers, 8 
assistant engineers and 28 others in various engineering capacities 
and as sanitary inspectors, clerks, stenographers and messengers, 
the total force numbering 43. 

A maintenance force in addition to those engaged in engineering 
rapacities, as above mentioned, numbering upon the average during 
the year 244, has been required at the pumping stations, upon 
reservoirs, aqueducts, pipe lines and upon minor construction work. 
At the end of the year this force numbered 233. 

Frederick D. Smith, Engineer of Sewerage Works, has had charge 
of both construction and maintenance of the works. He has been 
assisted by Henry T. Stiff, Division Engineer in charge of the office 
and drafting, by 2 assistant engineers and by 10 others employed in 
different engineering capacities, and by 2 stenographers and clerks. 

The maximum engineering force employed at any one time during 
the year on the construction and maintenance of the Sewerage Works 
was 15. 

The regular maintenance force required in addition for the opera- 
tion of the pumping stations, the care and inspection of the sewers, 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 3 

and for other parts of the Sewerage Works, exclusive of the engineers 
and day-labor forces, on the average has been 165. 

The whole regular force of the Sewerage Department at the end 
of the year numbered 180, of whom the Engineer and 14 assistants 
and draftsmen were engaged in general upon the works, and of the 
remainder, 101 were employed upon the North System and 64 upon 
the South System. 

The maximum number of men employed upon contracts and upon 
day-labor construction on the Sewerage Works during the year was 
for the week ending June 27, when the number amounted to 125. 

II. METROPOLITAN WATER DISTRICT. 

The Metropolitan Water District now comprises the cities of 
Boston, Chelsea, Everett, Maiden, Medford, Melrose, Newton, 
Quincy and Somerville, and the towns of Arlington, Belmont, Lex- 
ington, Milton, Nahant, Revere, Stoneham, Swampscott, W T atertown 
and Winthrop, — in all 9 cities and 10 towns. The District has 
an area of 174.8 square miles, no additional municipalities having 
been admitted into the District during the year. Its population, 
according to the LTnited States Census taken for April 1, 1910, was 
1,070,256. The population of the District on July 1, 1914, the date 
upon which calculations for the Water Works are based, was esti- 
mated as 1,177,770. 

III. METROPOLITAN WATER WORKS — CONSTRUCTION. 

The total amount expended for the construction and acquisition 
of the Metropolitan Water W T orks since the passage of the Met- 
ropolitan Water Act in the year 1895 has been $42,414,140.55. 

The total amount expended during the calendar year on account 
of the construction and acquisition of works has been $177,397.02. 
The details of this expenditure are as follows: on account of the 
construction of a steel tank or reservoir on Bellevue Hill with 
connecting pipe lines and the reinforcement of the southern high- 
service pipe lines in Milton, the sum of $94,711.75; for the work on 
lowering water pipes in Chelsea Creek, $53,259.15; for the prelim- 
inary work on account of the power plant at Sudbury Dam and the 
improvement of Beaver Dam Brook, the sums of $781.35 and $158.58, 
respectively; for the construction of the Hyde Park pumping sta- 



4 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

tion, the sum of $1,751.08; for stock on hand, $18,487.02; and for 
other minor works, engineering and administration expenses, the 
sum of $8,248.09. 

The construction of the tunnel under Chelsea Creek between 
Chelsea and East Boston, in which to place a 42-inch cast-iron 
water main for use in supplying water to the East Boston district, 
was finished on December 31. The work remaining to be done 
consists in making connections with existing mains in Chelsea and 
East Boston and removing the two 24-inch mains now in the chan- 
nel. This work has been done within the appropriation made by 
the Legislature. 

The laying of a 24-inch pipe line from the Lower Mills in Dor- 
chester, through Adams Street in Milton and Quincy to the junc- 
tion of Adams and Beale streets in the last-named city, for a distance 
of 13,000 feet, was begun during the past summer and will be finished 
during the early part of the coming season, this pipe line being laid 
to reinforce the existing single 24-inch main in case of extraordinary 
draft or in case of accident. 

The standpipe on Bellevue Hill, used in connection with the pump- 
ing station at Hyde Park in supplying water to the higher lands in 
West Roxbury, Hyde Park and Milton, has a storage capacity of 
only 135,000 gallons. To provide a more adequate storage, the 
construction of a larger reservoir with a capacity of 2,500,000 
gallons and the laying of a new 20-inch pipe line, connecting the 
pumping station with the above-mentioned reservoir, was begun dur- 
ing the year and the pipe line and the steel tank are completed. 
It remains to build the surrounding structure of granite, which it 
is expected will be completed during the coming season. 

Under authority granted in 1909, the Board in the years 1909 
and 1910 laid 17,854 feet of 60-inch cast-iron pipe, extending from 
a point on Commonwealth Avenue near Valentine Street, in Newton, 
to Cleveland Circle near Chestnut Hill Reservoir, and the completion 
of the line to the Charles River, a further distance of 14,520 feet, 
was at that time deferred. In order to take advantage of the present 
favorable time for the completion of this work, contracts were made 
for the pipe and special castings needed for the work. About 240 
tons of the pipe for this work had. been delivered at the close of the 
year, and contracts will be made for laying the pipes early in the 
coming season. 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 5 

Chapter 601 of the Acts of 1914 authorized the expenditure of 
$80,000 in constructing a hydro-electric plant at the Sudbury Dam, 
in Southborough, to be used in developing electric energy and 
thus conserving the power in the water previous to its use in the 
Metropolitan District. 

Before installing the necessary machinery it was deemed expedient 
to make a contract for the sale of the energy. Bids were received 
on September 2, and a contract has been made with the Edison 
Electric Illuminating Company of Boston, which provides that 
for a term of fi.ve years that Company will take and pay $6.25 per 
thousand kilowatt hours for all energy delivered to its lines at a 
point near the Sudbury Dam. Plans and specifications for the 
construction and installation of the necessary machinery are now 
practically finished and proposals will soon be received for doing 
the work. 

The City Engineer of Worcester and the Chief Engineer of the 
Metropolitan Water Works, acting as arbitrators under the terms 
of the legislative act authorizing the city of Worcester to divert 
the water from a portion of the Wachusett watershed, have made a 
report which has been accepted by the city, and the amount of the 
award with interest will be paid early in the present year. 

During the year easements in 0.862 of an acre of land were ac- 
quired for the Water Works. 

IV. WATER WORKS — MAINTENANCE. 

The maintenance and operation of the Metropolitan Water Works 
during the past calendar year have required the expenditure of 
$413,078.95. 

(1) Storage Reservoirs. 

The water in the Wachusett Reservoir reached its highest eleva- 
tion, 395.43, on April 1. 

The Sudbury Reservoir, Framingham Reservoir No. 3 and Lake 
Cochituate, from which water is discharged into the Weston, Sud- 
bury and Cochituate aqueducts, have been kept nearly full during 
the year. 

It has not been necessary to draw water for the supply of the 
Metropolitan District from Framingham Reservoir No. 1, Fram- 
ingham Reservoir No. 2, Farm Pond, Ashland, Hopkinton and 



6 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

Whitehall reservoirs and Lake Cochituate, but water has been 
discharged from Framingham Reservoir No. 1 and Framingham 
Reservoir No. 2 into Farm Pond, from which the town of Framing- 
ham obtains indirectly most of its supply. 

(2) Aqueducts. 

The Wachusett Aqueduct was in service for the passage of water 
from the Wachusett Reservoir to the Sudbury Reservoir during the 
whole or portions of 291 days. The quantity of water flowing 
through the aqueduct was equal to an average of 92,420,000 gallons 
per day for the entire year. Of the total quantity of water admitted 
to the aqueduct 98 per cent, was used before its admission for the 
development of electric energy. 

For distribution to the cities and towns of the Metropolitan 
Water District water was drawn through the Sudbury Aqueduct 
to the Chestnut Hill Reservoir during portions of every day in the 
year, the daily average for the whole year being 67,564,000 gallons. 

The Weston Aqueduct was in use during the entire year, the 
quantity of water delivered through the aqueduct being equivalent 
to a daily average of 37,643,000 gallons. 

(3) Pumping Stations. 

During the year 65 per cent, of the water furnished for distribu- 
tion to the Metropolitan Water District was pumped at the two 
Chestnut Hill stations. The remaining 35 per cent, of the water 
was distributed by gravity, this proportion being 2 per cent, greater 
than in 1913. Other pumping at the Spot Pond, Arlington and 
Hyde Park pumping stations has been required for supplying the 
higher portions of the District. 

The average quantity pumped per day at the Chestnut Hill 
stations was 69,930,000 gallons, at the Spot Pond station 7,367,000 
gallons, at the Arlington station 718,000 gallons and at the Hyde 
Park station 700,000 gallons, a total of 78,715,000 gallons per day. 

The following are the several pumping stations : — 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 





Number 

of 
Engines. 


Contract 

Capacity per 

Day 

(Gallons). 


Lift (Feet). 


Chestnut Hill high-service station, 


4 


66,000,000 


138 


Chestnut Hill low-service station, . . . 


3 


105,000,000 


60 


Chestnut Hill low-service station, ..... 


1 


40,000,000 


130 


Spot Pond station, 


2 


30,000,000 


125 


Arlington station, ........ 


2 


3,000,000 


290 


Hyde Park station, 


2 


6,000,000 


140 



The cost of operating the stations was $104,806.20, equivalent 
to $3,648 per million gallons pumped. The total cost is somewhat 
more than for the year 1913, the cost per million gallons showing 
an increase of $0,224, owing to an increase in cost of repairs. 

The total amount of coal purchased during the year was 7,796.53 
gross tons, of which 6,919.93 tons were bituminous and 876.60 tons 
anthracite. All of the anthracite coal was buckwheat and screen- 
ings. The cost of bituminous coal delivered in the bins at the 
various stations varied from $4 to $5.13, and the cost of anthracite 
coal varied from $2.50 to $3.16 per ton. 

(4) Pipe Lines. 

Greater even than the ordinary deterioration of water pipes by 
reason of rust have been the dangers from electrolytic action. 
Careful examinations made during the past year show in various 
parts of the system an improved condition in the amount of electro- 
lytic action upon the main pipes, and while the danger from this 
source is by no means obviated, it is believed that the practice of 
making insulating joints at intervals of about 500 feet in all new 
pipe lines will have the effect of materially reducing the danger to 
the pipe system from this source. The question of the legal 're- 
sponsibility for the damage hitherto inflicted upon the water pipes 
of the Metropolitan System has not yet been definitely settled and 
is still under consideration by the legal authorities of the State. 



(5) Protection of the Water Supply. 
The Marlborough Brook filter-beds, on which is filtered the water 
received from brooks passing through the thickly settled portions 



8 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

of Marlborough, have been adequate for the filtration of all the 
water received. 

The Pegan Brook pumping station, at which is pumped upon the 
filter-beds the surface drainage of about one square mile in the 
thickly settled portion of Natick, was in operation 256 days in the 
year. 

The filter-beds which receive for filtration the water flowing 
through the thickly settled portion of the town of Sterling, as well as 
the smaller filter-beds which receive the drainage from a few houses 
near Sterling Junction, the Worcester County Training School at 
West Boylston and from the swimming pool at Southborough, have 
been in successful operation and required only the usual attention 
during the year. 

Studies for the disposal qf manufacturing wastes, as well as for 
the disposal of house drainage from the various towns within the 
drainage area of the Metropolitan Water System, have been in 
progress during the year. 

Constant inspection of the watersheds is maintained by the 
Sanitary Inspector and his assistants and members of the main- 
tenance force. 

Chemical examinations of the waters used were made by the State 
Board of Health and the State Department of Health, and in addi- 
tion, microscopical and bacterial examinations were made by this 
Board. These examinations enable the Board to take measures to 
remedy any difficulties which are found to exist. 

The quality of the water brought to the Metropolitan Dis- 
trict continues to be satisfactory both in taste and in appear- 
ance. This condition results in a large measure from the fact that 
it is still possible to reject some of the sources which were in use 
before the extension of the water works to the South Branch of the 
Nashua River at Clinton. The water derived from the Wachusett 
watershed has been of superior quality to that coming from the 
Sudbury and Cochituate sources. The first-named supply, so far as 
possible, has been that conveyed to the District; the others have 
been wasted to a greater or less extent as occasion has permitted. 

The time, however, is approaching when all the sources will be 
required for the supply of the District. When that day arrives it 
will be necessary, without doubt, to filter these inferior waters in 
order to bring them to the standard of excellence to which the 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 9 

District has become accustomed since the establishment of the 
Metropolitan water supply. 

The subject of adequate filtration has been carefully considered, 
and whenever the need of such treatment becomes urgent, the Board 
will be in a position at once to construct the necessary works. 

(6) Clinton Sewerage Works. 

For the purpose of removing a possible nuisance in the Nashua 
River below Clinton, a filtration area was established in South 
Lancaster just north of the Clinton boundary line. All of the 
sewage of Clinton, which had hitherto directly entered the South 
Branch of the Nashua River, has been pumped to this filtration 
field since September 15, 1899. The method of operating this filtra- 
tion plant has from the beginning been carried out strictly in ac- 
cordance with the best practice of the day, and the beds to-day are 
probably in better condition than any similar disposal area in the 
State. The purification of the effluent from the beds is now entirely 
satisfactory. It is still true, however, that during certain hours of 
the sultry days of summer there is an appreciable nuisance occasioned 
by some of the processes now employed in sewage filtration. It is 
evident to the Board that these processes, which occasion a certain 
amount of disagreeable odor, may be so far changed that no serious 
interference with the public comfort need take place in the future. 
The offensive odors do not appear, however, at any time to have 
gone to any considerable distance beyond the highway which skirts 
one side of the area devoted to filtration purposes. It is confidently 
expected that the changes and improvements now proposed in the 
arrangement of these works will be completed before the season 
when complaint has usually arisen with regard to offensive odors 
proceeding from these beds. 

(7) Forestry. 

During the past ten years over 1,500,000 white pine and spruce 
seedlings have been planted on more than 1,313 acres of land owned 
by the Board in the vicinity of the Wachusett Reservoir, and there 
remain about 600 acres on the Wachusett watershed to be planted. 
It is also planned to plant pines on about 800 acres of land in the 
vicinity of the reservoirs on the Sudbury River watershed. During 



10 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

the year 99,300 white pine seedlings have been planted on this 
area in the vicinity of the Sudbury Reservoir. The wooded areas 
upon the watersheds have received the attention necessary to 
preserve and improve the growth already in existence there. 

The ravages of the gypsy and brown-tail moths and of the elm- 
leaf beetle have continued during the year, requiring a large amount 
of work and considerable expense to protect the trees on lands 
controlled by the Board. The egg clusters of the gypsy moth have 
been painted with creosote and nests of the brown-tail moths de- 
stroyed by burning, and extensive spraying has been required for 
the preservation of trees infested by moths and elm-leaf beetles. 

(8) Wachusett Power Plant. 
The hydro-electric power station at the Wachusett Dam was 
operated on 286 days during the year. The daily output varied from 
the minimum amount which the Connecticut River Transmission 
Company is required to take under its contract, to the full capacity 
of the plant. The operation of the plant has been entirely success- 
ful, the gross earnings for the year being $38,004.69. The cost of 
operating the plant has been $8,969.46, the net earnings, $29,035.23 
and the net earnings per thousand kilowatt hours generated, $4,052. 

(9) Rainfall and Water Supply. 

The rainfall is still below the average, and somewhat less than 
in the preceding year. On the Wachusett watershed the rainfall 
was 38.54 inches and on the Sudbury watershed 37.71 inches, while 
the averages for the periods covered by the records have been, 
respectively, 45.43 inches and 44.81 inches. 

The Wachusett watershed yielded a daily average of 1,445,000 
gallons of water per square mile, and the Sudbury watershed yielded 
a daily average of 772,000 gallons. The Wachusett watershed 
yielded a daily average of 1,073,000 gallons per square mile, for 
the 18 years during which measurements have been made, and the 
daily average per square mile from the Sudbury watershed during 
the 40 years for which records have been kept has been 995,000 
gallons. 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 11 

(10) 'Water Consumption. 

During the year the quantity of water supplied to the Metro- 
politan Water District amounted to a daily average of 107,036,100 
gallons, which was equivalent to 94 gallons for each person in the 
District. This quantity was 3,188,400 gallons more than the average 
daily consumption of the preceding year. 

Acting under the authority conferred by several statutes and 
arrangements which have been made, water has been supplied to a 
limited extent outside of the Metropolitan Water District. There 
has been drawn from the open channel of the Wachusett Aqueduct 
for the use of the Westborough State Hospital a daily average 
quantity of 183,000 gallons. The town of Framingham has, under 
the provision of the statute, drawn indirectly from Farm Pond a 
daily average quantity of 692,877 gallons and directly from the Sud- 
bury Aqueduct 113,427 gallons. A portion of the town of Saugus has 
been supplied through the town of Revere with an average of 
13,700 gallons daily. The United States Government, for use on 
Peddock's Island, has been supplied with a daily average of 109,000 
gallons, and a daily average of 305,300 gallons has been furnished 
the town of Wakefield as an emergency supply. The sums charged 
for the water thus supplied have amounted to $14,068.60. 

V. WATER WORKS — FINANCIAL STATEMENT. 

The financial abstract of the receipts, disbursements, assets and 
liabilities of the Board for the State fiscal year, beginning with 
December 1, 1913, and ending with November 30, 1914, was, in 
accordance with the requirements of chapter 235 of the Acts of the 
year 1906, presented to the General Court in January last, and a 
copy of this financial abstract is printed as Appendix No. 5. 

As required by said chapter a detailed statement of its doings for 
the calendar year 1914, in relation to the Metropolitan Water Works, 
is herewith presented. 



12 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

Construction. 

(1) Water Loans — ■ Receipts and Payments. 

Total loans authorized to January 1, 1915, .... $42,798,000 00 * 

Receipts from the sales of property applicable to the construc- 
tion and acquisition of works : — 

For the period prior to January 1, 1914, . $234,177 74 
For the year ending December 31, 1914, . 8,749 26 

242,927 00 

Receipt from town of Swampscott for admission to District 

(St. 1909, c. 320), 90,000 00 

Total amount authorized to January 1, 1915, . . . $43,130,927 00 

Amounts approved by Board for payments out of Water Loan 
Fund: — 
Payments prior to January 1, 1914, . $42,236,743 53 
Approved for year ending December 31, 

1914, . * 177,397 02 

42,414,140 55 

Amount authorized but not expended January 1, 1915, . $716,786 45 

(2) Total Water Debt, December 31, 1914. 

Water Loan Outstanding, Sinking Fund and Debt. 

Bonds issued by the Treasurer of the Common wealth : — ■ 

Sinking fund bonds (3 and 3± per cent.), .... $41,398,000 00 
Serial bonds (3| and 4 per cent.), 648,000 00 

Total bond issue to December 31, 1914, . . . .$42,046,000 00 
Serial bonds paid prior to January 1, 1914, . . $15,000 00 
Serial bonds paid in 1914, 10,000 00 

25,000 00 

Total bond issue outstanding December 31, 1914, . . $42,021,000 00 

Gross Water Debt, $42,021,000 00 

Sinking fund December 31, 1914, ....... 11,533,453 45 

Net Water Debt December 31, 1914, • $30,487,546 55 

A decrease for the year of $667,751.77. 

1 Included in this amount is $254,000, appropriated by chapter 601, Acts of 1914, for constructing a 
24-inch main from River Street in Dorchester through Milton to Quincy; a reservoir on Bellevue Hill in 
Boston; a 20-inch force main to said reservoir; and an electric power plant at Sudbury Dam. 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



13 



(3) Metropolitan Water Loan and Sinking Fund, 
December 31, 1914. 



Year. 


Authorized 
Loans. 


Bonds 

issued (Sinking 

Fund). 


Bonds 

issued (Serial 

Bonds). 


Sinking Fund. 


1895, 


$27,000,000 


$5,000,000 


- 


$226,286 05 


1896, 














- 


2,000,000 


- 


699,860 70 


1897, 
















6,000,000 


- 


954,469 00 


1898, 














- 


4,000,000 


- 


1,416,374 29 


1899, 














- 


3,000,000 


- 


1,349,332 97 


1900, 














- 


1,000,000 


- 


1,573,619 72 


1901, 














13,000,000 


10,000,000 


- 


1,662,426 95 


1902, 














- 


3,500,000 


- 


2,256,803 81 


1903, 














- 


1,500,000 


- 


2,877,835 59 


1904, 














- 


2,500,000 


- 


3,519,602 92 


1905, 














- 


650,000 


- 


4,207,045 69 


1906, 














500,000 


1,350,000 


- 


4,897,822 62 


1907, 














- 


- 


- 


5,643,575 69 


1908, 














398,000 


- 


- 


6,419,283 28 


1909, 














900,000 


398,000 


- 


7,226,262 31 


1910, 














80,000 


500,000 


- 


8,089,902 91 


1911, . 














212,000 


- 


$200,000 


8,953,437 44 


1912, . 














600,000 


- 


190,000 


9,829,356 80 


1913, . 














108,000 


- 


- 


10,767,701 68 


1914, . 














- 


- 


258,000 


11,533,453 45 
















$42,798,000 


$41,398,000 


$648,000 





(4) Water Assessment, 1914. 
The following water assessment was made by the Treasurer of the 
Commonwealth upon the various municipalities: — 



Sinking fund requirements, 
Serial bonds, .... 
Less premium, .... 

Interest, 

Maintenance: — 

Appropriated by Legislature, 
Less balance on hand, 



Total water assessment for 1914, 



$17,000 00 
13,431 75 



$450,551 91 
6,303 25 



$280,333 00 



3,568 25 
1,444,806 05 



444,248 66 
$2,172,95.") 96 



14 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



In accordance with chapter 488, Acts of 1895, as amended in 1901, 
1904 and 1906, the proportion to be paid by each city and town is 
based one-third in proportion to their respective valuations and 
the remaining two-thirds in proportion to their respective water 
consumption for the preceding year, except that but one-fifth of 
the total valuation and no consumption has been taken for the 
city of Newton, as it has not been supplied with water from the 
Metropolitan works. 

The division of the assessment for 1914 was as follows: — ■ 



Cities and Towns. 



Arlington, 
Belmont, 
Boston, 
Chelsea, . 
Everett, . 
Lexington, 
Maiden, . 
Medford, . 
Melrose, . 
Milton, 



Assessment. 



$16,583 29 

9,583 11 

1,676,038 11 

50,869 84 

45,438 12 

8,242 15 

46,596 27 

27,914 48 

22,647 92 

15,894 25 



Cities and Towns. 



Nahant, . 
Newton, . 
Quincy, . 
Revere, . 
Somerville, 
Stoneham, 
Swampscott, 
Watertown, 
Winthrop, 



Assessment. 



$5,755 70 

6,221 66 

51,469 66 

27,021 39 

109,999 13 

7,777 36 

10,810 32 

18,688 47 

15,404 73 



J,172,955 96 



(5) Supplying Water to Cities and Towns outside of 
District and to Water Companies. 

Sums have been received during the year 1914 under the provi- 
sions of the Metropolitan Water Act, for water furnished, as fol- 
lows: — 



Town of Framingham, $690 69 

Town of Revere (on account of water furnished to a portion of the 

town of Saugus for 1913), . . . ■ ■ 280 00 

United States Government (for Peddock's Island), .... 2,463 15 

Westborough State Hospital, 1,992 66 



$5,426 50 



The sums so received prior to March 23, 1907, were annually dis- 
tributed among the cities and towns of the District; but since that 
date, in accordance with the provisions of chapter 238 of the Acts 
of 1907, the sums so received have been paid into the sinking fund. 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



15 



(6) Expenditures for the Different Works. 

The following is a summary of the expenditures made in the vari- 
ous operations for the different works : — 



Construction and Acquisition of Works. 



For the Year ending 
December 31, 1914. 



Administration applicable to all parts of the construction and acquisition of 

the works, . 

Wauchusett Department, 

Beaver Dam Brook improvement, . . . 

Power Plant at Sudbury Dam, 

Distribution system: — 
Low service: — 

Lowering pipe at Chelsea Creek, 

Northern extra high service : — 

Pipe lines and connections, 

Southern high service: — 

Section 43 (24-inch main in Dorchester through Milton to Quincy), 
Southern extra high service: — 

Section 42 (20-inch main to reservoir on Bellevue Hill), . 

Bellevue Reservoir on Bellevue Hill in Boston, 

Legal services 

Hyde Park pumping station, 

Weston Aqueduct supply mains, 

Meters and connections, . 

Stock — pipes, valves, castings, etc., purchased and sent first to storage yards, 
and later transferred, as needed, to the various parts of the work: — 

Amount received, 

Transferred from storage yards to the various sections of the work and in- 
cluded in costs of special works, 

Acquisition of existing water works: — 
Legal and expert expenses, 



Amount charged from beginning of work to January 1, 1914, 

Total for construction and acquisition of works to January 1, 1915, 



S.259 15 



107 89 


48,367 31 


21,926 33 


24,394 31 


23 80 


1,751 08 


327 52 


706 07 



$59,838 85 
41,351 83 



$5,668 20 

1,401 41 

158 58 

781 35 



150,863 46 



18,487 02 



37 00 

$177,397 02 
42,236,743 53 

142,414,140 55 



16 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



Maintenance and Operation. 



For the Year ending 
December 31, 1914. 



Administration, 
General supervision, . 
Taxes and other expenses, 
Wachusett Department: — 

Superintendence, . 

Reservoir, .... 

Forestry, .... 

Protection of supply, 

Buildings and grounds, . 

Wachusett Dam, 

Wachusett Aqueduct, 

Clinton sewerage system: — 
Pumping station, 
Sewers, screens and filter-beds, 

Sanitary inspection, 

Swamp drainage, . 

Power plant, .... 



Sudbury Department: — 

Superintendence, Framingham office 

Ashland Reservoir, 

Hopkinton Reservoir, . . . . ... 

Whitehall Reservoir, 

Framingham Reservoirs Nos. 1, 2 and 3 

Sudbury Reservoir, 

Lake Cochituate, 

Marlborough Brook filters, . ... 

Pegan filters, 

Sudbury and Cochituate watersheds, 

Sanitary inspection, 

Cochituate Aqueduct, 

Sudbury Aqueduct, 

Weston Aqueduct, 

Forestry, . . . ... 

Improvement and protection of water supplies, . 

Distribution Department: — 
Superintendence, ......... 

Arlington pumping station, pumping service, 

Chestnut Hill low-service pumping station, pumping service, 

Chestnut Hill high-service pumping station, pumping service, 

Spot Pond pumping station, pumping service, 

West Roxbury pumping station, pumping service, 

Hyde Park pumping station, pumping service, 

Bear Hill Reservoir, ..... 

Chestnut Hill Reservoir and grounds, . 
Fells Reservoir, ...... 

Forbes Hill Reservoir, . . . . . 

Mystic Lake, conduit and pumping station, 
Mystic Reservoir, 



$9,009 04 
8,511 99 

11,916 80 
3,082 82 
3,632 97 
3,760 77 
5,657 89 

1,823 90 
4,577 91 
2.058 69 
2,753 27 
5,881 96 



$11,062 40 
1,900 02 
1,840 61 
639 84 
5,725 77 
5,605 50 
4,902 45 
3,011 43 
4,956 75 
2,160 78 
3,067 62 
2,808 32 
5,306 90 
4,981 44 
8,557 09 
1,300 75 



Amounts carried forward, 



7,751 98 

55,202 56 

18,037 01 

15,197 19 

137 25 

7,252 33 

27 00 

9,420 83 

721 72 

1,114 61 

1,925 92 

849 66 



113,129 75 
28,809 64 
44,247 40 



62,668 01 



67,827 67 



$122,188 92 $216,682 47 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



17 



Maintenance and Operation. 



For the Year ending 
December 31, 1914. 



Amounts brought forward, 



Distribution Department — Con. 

Waban Hill Reservoir, 

Weston Reservoir 

Spot Pond, . . . . . . 

Buildings at Spot Pond, 

Pipe lines: — 

Low service, ....... 

Northern high service, 

Northern extra high service, .... 

Southern high service, . . . 

Southern extra high service, . . 

Supply pipe lines, 

Buildings at Chestnut Hill Reservoir, . 

Chestnut Hill pipe yard, 

Glenwood pipe yard and buildings, 

Stables, 

Waste prevention 

Venturi meters, . . . 

Measurement of water, 

Arlington pumping station, buildings and grounds, 
Hyde Park pumping station, buildings and grounds, 
Fisher Hill Reservoir, 



$122,186 92 £216,682 47 



286 82 
4,033 80 
8,413 25 

245 43 

28,155 11 
5,357 68 

261 47 
5,759 18 

376 35 

623 20 
2,694 67 
1,595 87 
4,128 79 
6,492 80 
27 75 
1,021 52 
1,601 97 

307 11 

357 52 
2,469 27 196,396 48 



Total for maintaining and operating works, 



$413,078 95 



(7) Detailed Financial Statement under Metropolitan 

Water Act. 

The Board herewith presents, in accordance with the requirements 
of the Metropolitan Water Act, a detailed statement of the expendi- 
tures and disbursements, receipts, assets and liabilities for the year 
1914. 

(a) Expenditures and Disbursements. 

The total amount of the expenditures and disbursements on ac- 
count of construction and acquisition of works for the year beginning 
January 1, 1914, and ending December 31, 1914, was $177,397.02, 
and the total amount from the time of the organization of the Met- 
ropolitan Water Board, July 19, 1895, to December 31, 1914, has 
been $42,414,140.55. 

For maintenance and operation the expenditures for the year 
were $413,078.95. 

The salaries of the commissioners, and the other expenses of 
administration, have been apportioned to the construction of the 



18 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



works and to the maintenance and operation of the same, and 
appear under each of those headings. 

The following is a division of the expenditures according to their 
general character : — • 



General Character of Expenditures. 



For the Year ending 
December 31, 1914. 



Construction of Works and Acquisition by Purchase or Taking. 

Administration . 

Commissioners, 

Secretary and auditor, 

Clerks and stenographers, 

Stationery and printing, 

Postage, express and telegrams, 

Furniture and fixtures, 

Telephone, lighting, heating, water and care of building, ...... 

Alterations and repairs of building, 

Rent and taxes, main office, .......... 

Miscellaneous expenses 

Engineering. 

Chief engineer, 

Principal assistant engineers, 

Engineering assistants 

Inspectors, 

Railroad and street car travel, .......... 

Stationery and printing, 

Engineering and drafting supplies, 

Postage, express and telegrams, 

Telephone, lighting, heating, water and care of buildings: — 

Main office, 

Sub-offices, 

Alterations and repairs of building — main office, 

Rent and taxes, main office, 

Unclassified supplies, 

Miscellaneous expenses, 

Construction. 
Preliminary work: — 
Advertising, ............. 

Lumber and field buildings ■ 

Tools, machinery, appliances and hardware supplies, . . ~ 

Contracts, Wachusett Reservoir: — 

McBride & Co., Stillwater Improvement, Contract 283 

Contracts, Distribution System: — 
Coffin Valve Co., for furnishing water valves, Contract 358, 
DeVincenzi & Baruffoldi, laying water pipes in Arlington, Mass., Section 

36 of Distribution System, Contract 322, 
Laidlaw-Dunn-Gordon Co., for furnishing two pumping engines for Hyde 
Park pumping station, Contract 346, 

Amounts carried forward , .......... 



$2,708 34 




750 00 




1,465 01 




237 24 




29 20 




39 50 




203 00 




44 




212 72 




22 75 






$5,668 20 




$570 52 




2,316 35 




7,533 82 




1,821 75 




107 97 




312 96 




47 21 




2 27 




609 12 


< 


2 45 




1 30 




638 10 




16 65 




126 35 






14,106 82 




$297 51 




10 28 




1 55 






.309 34 


$1,314 91 


2,873 00 




100 00 




1,725 50 





5,013 41 $20,084 36 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



19 



General Character of Expenditures. 



For the Year ending 
December 31, 1914. 



Amounts brought forward, 



Construction — Con. 

Contracts, Distribution System — Con. 
Roberts Iron Works, for furnishing steel casings for shafts of tunnel under 

Chelsea Creek, Contract 353, 

United States Cast Iron Pipe and Foundry Co., cast-iron water pipes and 

special castings, Contract 352, 

Warren Foundry and Machine Co. , cast-iron water pipes and special castings, 

Contract 355, 

Warren Foundry and Machine Co., cast-iron water pipes and special castings, 

Contract 356 

Coleman Bros., lowering pipe at Chelsea Creek, Contract 354, . 

John J.Evans, for laying water pipe in Boston, Milton and Quincy, Section 

43, of southern high service, Contract 359 

Chas. R. Gow Co., for laying water pipe in Boston, Section 42, of southern 

extra high service, Contract 360, 

John E. Palmer, for constructing foundation for reservoir on Bellevue Hill 

in Boston, Contract 361, 

Walsh's Holyoke Steam Boiler Works, for building steel tank or reservoir 

on Bellevue Hill in Boston, Contract 357 

Additional work: — 

Labor, 

Traveling, 

Rent, . 

Freight and express, 

Tools, machinery, appliances and hardware supplies, 

Castings, ironwork and metals, 

Iron pipe and valves, 

Paint and coating, «... 

Lumber and field buildings, 

Brick, cement and stone, 

Sand, gravel and filling, 

Municipal and corporation work, 

Unclassified supplies, 

Miscellaneous expenses, 



Rcat Estate. 



Legal and expert: — 
Conveyancing expenses, 
Conveyancing supplies, . 

Settlements made by Board, 



Purchase of Existing Water Works. 



Legal services, 



Amount charged from beginning of work to January 1, 1914, 

Total amount of construction expenditures to January 1 , 1915, 



5,013 41 $20,084 36 



1,262 00 

8,447 14 

23,481 34 

23,540 00 
46,757 90 

10,804 69 
5,863 55 
5,424 94 

13,900 00 



$3,970 21 


90 


555 00 


195 04 


660 55 


616 84 


1,236 62 


12 08 


499 76 


563 75 


148 85 


3,197 76 


7 18 


5 85 



$26 80 

8 50 

75 00 



145,494 97 



11,670 39 



110 30 

37 00 



$177,397 02 
42,236,743 53 



12,414,1 in 65 



20 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



General Character of Expenditures. 



For the Year endini 
December 31, 1914. 



Maintenance and Operation of Works. 
Administration: — ■ 

Commissioners, 

Secretary and assistants, 

Rent - . . " . 

Repairs of building 

Fuel, 

Lighting, 

Care of building, , 

Postage, 

Printing, stationery and office supplies, 

Telephones, 

Traveling expenses, 

Miscellaneous expenses 

General supervision: — 

Chief engineer and assistants, 

Rent 

Repairs of building 

Fuel, 

Lighting, . 

Care of building, . 

Postage, 

Printing, stationery and office supplies, 

Telephones 

Traveling expenses, 

Miscellaneous expenses 

Pumping service: — 

Labor, * 

Fuel 

Oil, waste and packing, . . . . . , 

Repairs 

Small supplies, 

Rent, . 



Reservoirs, aqueducts, pipe lines, buildings and grounds: - 

Superintendents, • 

Engineering assistants, . . . . 
Sanitary inspectors, . . . . 

Labor, pay roll, 

Labor, miscellaneous 

Alterations and repairs of pumping stations, 
Alterations and repairs of other buildings and structures, 

Automobiles, * 

Brick, 

Amounts carried forward, ...... 



$5,458 33 


4,611 61 


534 78 


10 99 


59 10 


73 20 


382 77 


170 00 


1,276 04 


105 70 


256 09 


191 14 




$22,808 24 


1,604 38 


336 15 


177 31 


219 60 


1,148 38 


71 00 


557 81 


392 27 


727 86 


766 64 



166,154 04 

29,456 38 

1,230 08 

5,631 77 

1,101 05 

5 00 



$7,195 77 

10,221 04 

4,267 58 

158,456 36 

3,386 33 

648 30 

1,047 62 

4,239 68 

704 93 



103,578 32 



,167 61 $145,517 71 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



21 



General Character of Expenditures. 



For the Year ending 
December 31, 1914, 



Amounts brought forward, 



Con. 



Reservoirs, aqueducts, pipe lines, buildings and grounds 

Brooms, brushes and janitor's supplies, . 

Castings, ironwork and metals 

Cement and lime, 

Drafting and photo supplies, 

Fertilizer and planting material, 

Freight and express, 

Fuel, . . . . . 

Gypsy moth supplies 

Hardware, 

Hay and grain, 

Lighting, 

Lumber, 

Machinery, 

Paints and oils, 

Pipe and fittings, 

Postage, 

Printing, stationery and office supplies, 

Rubber and oiled goods, , 

Stable expenses, 

Sand, gravel and stone, . . . . • . 

Traveling expenses, 

Telephones, 

Teaming, 

Tools and appliances, 

Vehicles, harnesses and fittings, . . . . ■ . . . .- 

Miscellaneous expenses, 

Contracts: — 
C. W. Dolloff & Co., for repaving 24-inch water-pipe trench in Chelsea, 
Contract 38M, 



Payments in lieu of taxes, 

Total expenditures for maintenance and operation, 



$190,167 61 $145,517 71 



126 34 

863 52 

564 23 

108 10. 

1,260 77 

418 28 

2,317 42 

1,478 49 

1,067 09 

1,558 72 

241 64 

1,283 46 

943 37 

1,017 87 

3,961 59 

103 35 

810 37 

261 69 

718 46 

1,211 84 

2,586 48 

965 89 

1,625 21 

1,857 97 

493 68 

3,980 72 



1,319 68 



223,313 84 
44,247 40 

$413,078 95 



(b) Receipts. 

The total amount of receipts from the operations of the Board 
and from sales of property for the year beginning January 1, 1914, 
and ending December 31, 1914, was $68,889.61 and the total amount 
from the time of the organization of the Metropolitan Water Board, 
July 19, 189."), to December 31, 1914, has been $1,010,621.30. The 
general character of these receipts is as follows: — 



22 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



Geneeal Character of Receipts. 



For the Year ending 
December 31, 1914. 



Applicable to the loan fund: — 

Land and buildings, 

Construction tools, supplies and reimbursements, 

Applicable to payment of interest, sinking fund requirements and expenses 
of maintenance and operation: — 
Proceeds from operations of the Board : — 

Rents, 

Land products, 

Electric energy, 

Maintenance labor, tools, supplies and reimbursements, 

Interest and unclassified receipts, 

Applicable to the sinking fund: — 
Water supplied to cities and towns, water companies and others, 



Amount credited from beginning of work to January 1, 1914, 
Total receipts to January 1, 1915, 



$4,608 22 
4,141 04 



$1,834 00 


9,140 29 


39,892 11 


3,711 86 


135 59 



S.749 26 



54,713 85 

5,426 50 

$68,889 61 
941,731 69 

$1,010,621 30 



The foregoing receipts have been credited to the various objects 
or works, as follows: — 



Sources of Receipts. 



For the Year ending 
December 31, 1914. 



Supplying water outside of Water District, 

Construction and acquisition of works: — 
Administration, 
Wachusett Dam, 
Wachusett Reservoir, 
Wachusett Aqueduct, 
Distribution system, 
Purchase of existing water works, 

Maintenance and operation of works 
Administration, 
General supervision, 
Wachusett Aqueduct, 
Wachusett Reservoir, 
Electric power plant, 
Sudbury system, . 
Distribution system, 
Clinton sewerage system 



Amount credited from beginning of work to January 1, 1914, 
Total receipts to January 1, 1915, .... 



$25 23 

125 34 

129 64 

1 00 

3,999 16 

4,493 22 



$124 49 

57 81 

274 28 

8,319 06 

39,921 61 

2,997 92 

2,728 30 

266 05 



$5,426 50 



8,773 59 



54,689 52 

$68,889 61 

941,731 69 

$1,010,621 30 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



23 



(c) Assets. 

The following is an abstract of the assets of the Water Works, a 
complete schedule of which is kept on file in the office of the Board: — • 

Office furniture, fixtures and supplies; engineering and scientific instruments 
and supplies; police supplies; horses, vehicles, field machinery, etc.; ma- 
chinery, tools and other appliances and supplies; completed works, real 
estate and buildings connected therewith. 



(d) Liabilities. 

The sums due on monthly pay rolls amount to $552.39 and 
there are bills for current expenses which have not yet been received. 

Amounts on Monthly Estimates, not due until Completion of Contracts or until 

Claims are settled. 



Name. 



Work. 



Amount. 



Camoia & Williams, 
Joseph Hanreddy, 
Coleman Bros., 
John J. Evans, 
Charles R. Gow Co., 
John E. Palmer, . 

Walsh's Holyoke Steam Boiler Works 



Contract 308, Section 33 of northern high-service 
pipe lines, Distribution System. 

Contract 314, Section 7 of the Weston Aqueduct 
Supply Mains. 

Contract 354, water pipe tunnel under Chelsea 
Creek between East Boston and Chelsea, Mass. 

Contract 359, Section 43 of the southern high- 
service pipe lines, Distribution System. 

Contract 360, Section 42 of the southern extra high- 
service pipe lines, Distribution System. 

Contract 361, constructing foundation for reservoir 
on Bellevue Hill in West Roxbury District in 
Boston. 

Contract 357, for building steel tank or reservoir 
on Bellevue Hill in West Roxbury District in 
Boston. 



$200 00 
10 00 
8,251 40 
1,465 53 
1,034 74 
957 34 

1,600 00 



Claims have been made by the following parties for land taken 
and other damages, and suits are now pending in court for the 
determination of many of them : — ■ 

Patrick Bradley, Henry F. Keyes, James E. Welch, Byron D. 
Allen, J. Frank Wood et al., Edward F. Merriam, Sanford C. Kendall, 
estate of William H. Vickery, James H. and Hannah S. Wood, 
Francis W. M. Goodale, John Ward et al., heirs of George K. Ward. 



VI. METROPOLITAN SEWERAGE WORKS. 

The North Metropolitan Sewerage District embraces the cities of 
Cambridge, Chelsea, Everett, Maiden, Medford, Melrose, Somer- 
ville and Woburn, and the towns of Arlington, Belmont, Revere, 
Stoneham, Wakefield, Winchester, and Winthrop and parts of the 
city of Boston and the town of Lexington, — comprising in all 9 



24 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

cities and 8 towns, with an area of 90.50 square miles. The district 
has an estimated population, based upon the United States Census 
of. 1910, as of December 31, 1914, of 582,930. Of the total popula- 
tion it is estimated that 89.9 per cent., or 524,330 people, contribute 
sewage to the North Metropolitan System. 

The South Metropolitan Sewerage District includes the cities of 
Newton, Quincy and Waltham, and- the towns of Brookline, Milton 
and Watertown, and parts of the city of Boston and the town of 
Dedham, — ■ a total of 4 cities and 4 towns. This district has an 
area of 100.87 square miles, with an estimated population as of 
December 31, 1914, of 405,240. According to the estimates made 
67.9 per cent, of this population, or 275,310, contribute sewage to 
the South Metropolitan System. 

(1) North Metropolitan Sewerage System — ■ Construction. 

The amount expended for construction on account of the North 
Metropolitan System during the past year was $127,765.52. 

The construction of the New Mystic sewer, authorized by the 
Legislature of 1912, has been completed. 

The construction of the new screen-house at the East Boston 
pumping station, which replaces the only recently completed screen- 
house which was destroyed by an explosion on June 1, 1914, has 
been completed with the exception of a few details which do not 
interfere with the successful operation of the station, and arrange- 
ments are now being made which the Board believes will make a 
recurrence of the unfortunate accident on June 1 improbable in the 
future. 

A branch Metropolitan sewer to receive sewage from the south- 
west part of the town of Revere has been constructed in accordance 
with the provisions of chapter 259 of the Acts of 1914. This act 
provides that the cost of construction of this branch sewer shall 
be assessed upon the town of Revere. 

The Board acquired by taking easements in 0.4375 of an acre of 
land in Revere and Chelsea for the construction of the branch 
sewer for the town of Revere. 

The Board has not yet begun the construction of the extension 
of the Deer Island outfall for which provision was made in chapter 
344 of the Acts of 1914, but hopes to be able to make the necessary 
arrangements with the United States Government and the Directors 
of the Port of Boston to begin the work during the present year. 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



25 



(2) North Metropolitan Sewerage System — ■ Maintenance. 

The cost of the maintenance and operation of the North Metropol- 
itan System during the past year was $183,718.19. 

Sewers and Pumping Stations. 

The Metropolitan sewers in the North Metropolitan System now 
extend a distance of 63.66 miles, and the local sewers which are 
connected with the Metropolitan sewers have a further length of 
728.73 miles, involving 78,417 connections. 

The sewage of the North Metropolitan District flows at first by 
gravity, but before being finally disposed of is lifted at different 
points by pumping and is finally discharged into the harbor from 
an outfall off Deer Island. 

The daily average amount of sewage discharged into the harbor 
was 58,700,000 gallons, a daily average for each person contributing 
sewage of 112 gallons. The increase in the total amount of sewage 
discharged was 2,100,000 gallons per day more than the discharge 
of the preceding year. The maximum rate of discharge in any one 
day was 149,700,000 gallons. 

The pumping stations operated for the North Metropolitan Sewer- 
age System are as follows : — ■ 




Contract 

Capacity per 

Day 

(Gallons). 



Lift (Feet). 



Deer Island station (Boston harbor), 
East Boston station, . 



Charlestown station, . 

Alewife Brook station (Somerville), 



235,000,000 
235,000,000 

104,000,000 

22,000,000 



19 

19 

11 

8 

13 



There were purchased for the operation of the pumping stations 
6,867.312 tons of bituminous coal, the average prices of which, at 
the different stations, varied from $4.15 to $4.97 per gross ton 
delivered in the bins. 

The cost of operating the stations was $107,828.21. The average 
cost per million gallons of sewage lifted per foot at the several 
stations, was $0,146, a decrease of about 0.7 per cent, from the cost 
last year. 



26 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

(3) South Metropolitan Sewerage System — Construction. 

The amount expended for construction on account of the South 
Metropolitan System during the past year was $33,049.12. 

Under the provisions of chapter 343 of the Acts of 1914 it is 
provided that the town of Wellesley may be added to the South 
Metropolitan Sewerage District, dependent upon the acceptance of 
the act by the town. No action has yet been taken by the 
town. 

At the time of the construction of the High-level sewer two only 
of the 60-inch cast-iron outfall pipes, of the proposed five lines, 
were constructed. While these are sufficient for any ordinary dis- 
charge of sewage they have been so far overtaxed by the storm 
flows that it became apparent that an additional outfall capacity 
must be provided at this point. Accordingly a contract was made 
for the laying of an additional line of 60-inch cast-iron pipe to ex- 
tend about 1,200 feet into tide water to a point where the channel 
has a depth of 20 feet at low water. Work was begun upon this 
contract during the past season, but on account of the exposed 
situation at which the work was being done it was impossible to 
complete it, but it is expected that the work will be completed 
during the early months of the present year. 

(4) South Metropolitan Sewerage System — Maintenance,. 
The entire cost of maintenance of the South Metropolitan System 

during the past year was $106,628.07. 

Sewers and Pumping Stations. 

The Metropolitan sewers in the South Metropolitan System, 
which comprise the old Charles River valley sewer and Neponset 
River valley sewer, as well as the new High-level sewer and ex- 
tensions, have a total length of 43.48 miles, and with these are 
connected local sewers having a length of 610.03 miles, involving 
39,764 connections. 

The pumping stations operated for the South Metropolitan Sewer- 
age System are as follows : — • 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



27 



Number 
of 

Engines. 



Contract 

Capacity per 

Day 

(Gallons). 



Lift (Feet). 



Ward Street station (Roxbury District), 

Quincy station, . 

Quincy sewerage lifting station, 



100,000,000 

18,000,000 

3,000,000 



45 
28 
20 



The sewage of two small districts in Dorchester and Milton, 
included in the Neponset River valley system, which are too low 
for sewage to be delivered into the High-level sewer by gravity, is, 
under an arrangement with the city of Boston, disposed of through 
the Boston Main Drainage Works at Moon Island. By this arrange- 
ment the Board is relieved from the expense of providing extra 
pumping facilities. 

A large part of the sewage of the District is lifted into the High- 
level sewer at the Ward Street pumping station in Roxbury. Most 
of the sewage of the city of Quincy is pumped into the High-level 
sewer at Greenleaf Street near the Quincy pumping station. The 
entire sewage is screened at the Nut Island screen-house for the 
purpose of intercepting solid matter, and is thence discharged at 
the bottom of the harbor from the two outfalls about a mile off 
from the island. 

The daily average amount of sewage thus discharged was 52,600,- 
000 gallons, and the largest rate of discharge in a single day was 
during a heavy storm, when the amount reached 165,000,000 gallons. 
The decrease in the daily average from last year was 420,000 gallons. 
The daily average discharge of sewage for each individual contribut- 
ing sewage in the district was 191 gallons. 

There were 2,734.831 gross tons of bituminous coal purchased at 
the two pumping stations and screen-house, the average prices of 
which varied from $4.37 to $4.93 per gross ton delivered in the 
bins. 

The total amount expended for the operation of the stations was 
$63,284.36. 



VII. SEWERAGE WORKS — FINANCIAL STATEMENT. 

The financial abstract of the receipts, expenditures, disbursements, 
assets and liabilities of the Metropolitan Water and Sewerage Board 
for the fiscal year of the Commonwealth ending with November 



28 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

30, 1914 was, as stated in connection with the Water Works, pre- 
sented to the General Court in January, in accordance with the 
requirements of chapter 235 of the Acts of the year 1906, and a 
copy of this financial abstract is in part printed as Appendix No. 5. 
The following statement of its financial doings, in relation to the 
Metropolitan Sewerage Works, for the calendar year 1914, is here- 
with presented, in accordance with the provisions of the act of 1906, 
as a part of the annual report of the Board. 

(1) Metropolitan Sewerage Loans, Receipts and Payments. 
The loans authorized for the construction of the Metropolitan 
Sewerage Works, the receipts which are added to the proceeds of 
these loans, the expenditures for construction, and the balances 
available on January 1, 1915, have been as follows: — 

North Metropolitan System. 

Loans authorized under various acts prior to 1914 for the con- 
struction of the North Metropolitan System and the various 

extensions, $7,013,865 73 

Loans authorized under Acts of 1914: — 

Chapter 259, Revere Extension (Section 57 A), . . . 5,500 00 

Chapter 344, Deer Island Outfall Extension, .... 125,000 00 
Receipts from sales of real estate and from miscellaneous sources 
which are placed to the credit of the North Metropolitan 
System : — 

For the year ending December 31, 1914, . . $184 20 

For the period prior to January 1, 1914, . . 85,179 32 

■ 85,363 52 



$7,229,729 25 



Amount approved for payment by the Board l out of the Metro- 
politan Sewerage Loan Fund, North System : — 

For the year ending December 31, 1914, ., . $127,765 52 
For the period prior to January 1, 1914, . . 6,963,563 58 



7,091,329 10 

Balance, North Metropolitan System, January 1, 1915, . $138,400 15 

1 The word "Board" refers to the Metropolitan Sewerage Commission and the Metropolitan Water 
and Sewerage Board. 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 29 

South Metropolitan System. 

Loans authorized under the various acts, applied to the con- 
struction of the Charles River valley sewer, Neponset valley 
sewer, High-level sewer and extension, constituting the South 

Metropolitan System, $8,867,046 27 

Receipts from pumping, sales of real estate and from miscella- 
neous sources, which are placed to the credit of the South Met- 
ropolitan System: — ■ 
For the year ending December 31, 1914, . . $10 66 

For the period prior to January 1, 1914, . , 14,081 35 

14,092 01 



$,881,138 28 



Amount approved by the Board for payment out of the Met- 
ropolitan Sewerage Loan Fund, South System : — 

On account of the Charles River valley sewer, $800,046 27 
On account of the Neponset valley sewer, . 911,531 46 
On account of the High-level sewer and ex- 
tension : — 
For the year ending Decem- 
ber 31, 1914, .... $33,049 12 
For the period prior to Jan- 
uary 1, 1914, .... 7,111,009 43 

7,144,058 55 



8,855,636 28 

Balance, South Metropolitan System, January 1, 1915, . $25,502 00 

(2) Total Sewerage Debt, December 31, 1914. 

North Metropolitan System. 
Bonds issued by the Treasurer of the Commonwealth : — 

Sinking fund bonds (3 and 3£ per cent.), . . . . .$6,563,000 00 
Serial bonds (3£ and 4 per cent.), 440,000 00 

Total bond issue (North System) to December 31, 1914, . $7,003,000 00 
Serial bonds paid prior to January 1, 1914, . . $3,000 00 
Serial bonds paid in 1914, 13,000 00 

16,000 00 



Total bond issue (North System) outstanding December 
31, 1914, . ; $6,987,000 00 

Gross Sewerage Debt (North System), $6,987,000 00 

Sinking fund (North System) December 31, 1914, .... 1,922,492 30 

Net Sewerage Debt (North System) December 31, 1914, . . $5,064,507 70 
A decrease for the year of $178,782.83. 



30 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



South Metropolitan System. 
Bonds issued by the Treasurer of the Commonwealth: 
Sinking fund bonds (3 and 3| per cent.), . 
Serial bonds, 



5,877,912 00 



Total bond issue (South System), to December 31, 1914, . $8,877,912 00 



Gross Sewerage Debt (South System), .... 
Sinking fund (South System) December 31, 1914, . 

Net Sewerage Debt (South System) December 31, 1914, 
A decrease for the year of $96,391.71. 



. $8,877,912 00 
. 1,089,020 14 

. $7,788,891 86 



(3) North and South Metropolitan Loan and Sinking Funds, 

December 31, 1914. 



Year. 




Loans. 


Bonds issued 
(Sinking Fund). 


Bonds 

issued 
(Serial 
Bonds). 


Sinking 
Fund. 




North 
System. 


South 
System. 


North 
System. 


South 
System. 


North 
System. 


North and 
South 

Systems. 


1889, . 

1890, . 

1891, . 

1892, . 

1893, . 

1894, . 

1895, . 

1896, . 

1897, . 

1898, . 

1899, . 

1900, . 

1901, . 

1902, . 

1903, . 

1904, . 

1905, . 

1906, . 

1907, . 

1908, . 

1909, . 

1910, . 

1911, . 

1912, . 

1913, . 

1914, . 






$5,000,000 00 

500,000 00 

300,000 00 

30,000 00 

85,000 00 

215,000 00 

265,000 00 

500,000 00 

55,000 00 

413,000 00 

56,000 00 

6,000 00 

378,000 00 

130,500 00 


$500,000 00 

300,000 00 

35,000 00 

4,625,000 00 

10,912 001 

40,000 00 

1,000,000 00 
392,000 00 

1,175,000 00 


$2,200,000 

368,000 

1,053,000 

579,000 

500,000 

300,000 

30,000 

80,000 

220,000 

265,000 

500,000 

55,000 

300,000 
113,000 


$800,000 

300,000 

200,000 

300,000 

35,000 

1,025,000 
10,912 

2,040,000 
864,000 

1,736,000 
392,000 

175,000 
300,000 
700,000 


$62,000 
378,000 


$361,416 59 

454,520 57 

545,668 26 

636,084 04 

754,690 41 

878,557 12 

1,008,724 95 

1,146,998 68 

1,306,850 30 

1,492,418 98 

1,673,784 40 

1,931,741 89 

2,184,674 98 

2,458,541 20 

2,749,337 90 

3,011,512 44 




$7,933,500 00 2 
789,134 27 


$8,077,912 00 
789,134 27 


"* 


— 


; 










$7,144,365 73 


$8,867,046 27 


$6,563,000 


$8,877,912 


$440,000 





1 The sum of $10,912 was appropriated to reimburse the town of Watertown for the expense of con- 
structing the Watertown siphon. 

2 Of this amount $789,134.27 was expended for the construction of the Charle3 River valley sewer, 
which is now included in the South Metropolitan System. 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 31 

(4) Annual Appropriations, Receipts and Expenditures. 

The annual appropriations for the maintenance of the Metropoli- 
tan Sewerage Works, the receipts of the Board which are added to 
the appropriations for maintenance, and the expenditures for main- 
tenance for the year ending December 31, 1914, were as follows: — ■ 

North Metropolitan System. 
Appropriations as follows : — 

Chapter 220, Acts of 1914, . . ... . . . . $173,000 00 

Chapter 645, Acts of 1914, 

Chapter 734, Acts of 1914, 

Chapter 775, Acts of 1914, 

Chapter 796, Acts of 1914, ....... 

Receipts from pumping and from other sources, 

Amount approved by the Board for payment, 

Balance, January 1, 1915, . . . '. . . . $26,513 20 

South Metropolitan System. 

Appropriations as follows : — 

Chapter 221, Acts of 1914, $112,570 00 

Chapter 734, Acts of 1914, 1,500 00 

Receipts from pumping and from other sources, . * . . . 172 46 

$114,242 46 
Amount approved by the Board for payment, .... 106,628 07 



175 00 

1,500 00 

35,000 00 

200 00 

356 39 


$210,231 39 
183,718 19 



Balance, January 1, 1915, $7,614 39 

(5) Sewer Assessments, 1914. 
The following sewer assessments were made by the Treasurer of 
the Commonwealth upon the various municipalities : — ■ 



North Metropolitan Sewerage System 

Sinking fund requirements, . 

Serial bonds, 

Interest, 

Maintenance : — 

Appropriated by Legislature, .... $209,875 00 
Less balance on hand, 200 01 



$95,094 00 

10,000 00 

214,302 22 



209,674 99 



Total North Metropolitan sewerage assessment, . . $529,071 21 



32 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



South Metropolitan Sewerage System. 

Sinking fund requirements, 

Interest, 

Maintenance : — 

Appropriated by Legislature, .... $114,07000 
Less balance on hand, . . . - . ., . 8.111 65 



$56,506 00 
303,386 86 



105,958 35 



Total South Metropolitan sewerage assessment, 



$465,851 21 



In accordance with the provisions of chapter 369, Acts of 1906, 
the proportion to be paid by each city and town to meet the interest 
and sinking fund requirements for each year is based upon their 
respective taxable valuations, and to meet the cost of maintenance 
and operation upon their respective populations. 

The divisions of the assessments for 1914 were as follows: — 



North Metropolitan Sewerage System. 



Cities and Towns. 



Arlington, 
Belmont, 
Boston, . 
Cambridge, 
Chelsea, . 
Everett, . 
Lexington, 
Maiden, . 
Medford, . 



Assessment. 



$14,611 90 

8,227 20 

89,150 10 

114,341 14 

29,704 27 

31,656 73 

4,819 43 

43,619 59 

26,035 94 



Cities and Towns. 



Melrose, . 
Revere, . 
Somerville, 
Stoneham, 
Wakefield, 
Winchester, 
Winthrop, 
Woburn, . 
Total, 



Assessment. 



$17,437 18 
18,890 77 
72,437 60 
5,960 69 
11,118 54 
13,793 19 
13,841 23 
13,425 71 



,071 21 



South Metropolitan Sewerage System. 



Cities and Towns. 


Assessment. 


Cities and Towns. 


Assessment. 


Boston, 

Brookline, 

Dedham, . . . . 


$215,221 80 
90,022 00 
10,700 14 
21,515 56 
59,153 23 


Quincy, 

' Total, . . 


$29,125 39 
25,622 38 
14,490 71 


Milton, 

Newton, ..... 


$465,851 21 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



33 



(6) Expenditures for the Different Works. 
The following is a summary of the expenditures made in the vari- 
ous operations for the different works : — 



Construction and Acquisition op Works. 



For the Year ending 
December 31, 1914. 



North Metropolitan System. 
North System, main line and branches, 
North System, enlargement: — 

Administration, 

East Boston pumping station, extensions and additions, 

New Mystic sewer, 

Relocation part of Section 30, Cambridge, . 

Section 48A, Somerville and Medford, 

Section 57A, Revere Extension, 

Deer Island Outfall Extension, 



Amount charged from beginning of work to January 1, 1914, 
Total for North Metropolitan System to January 1, 1915, 
South Metropolitan System. 



High-level sewer, 

High-level sewer extension: - 
Administration, 
Section 85, Brighton, 
Relief Outfall, Section 43, 



Amount charged from beginning of work to January 1, 1914, 
Total for South Metropolitan System to January 1, 1915, 
Total for construction, both systems, . . . . 



$17 84 



$5,172 11 
273 30 
117,452 99 
408 13 
286 62 
3,724 28 
430 25 



127,747 68 
6,963,563 58 

$7,091,329 10 



$529 17 



$710 87 

28 86 

31,780 22 



32,519 95 

$33,049 12 
8,822,587 16 

$8,855,636 28 

$15,946,965 38 



Maintenance and Operation. 



For the Year ending 
December 31, 1914. 



North Metropolitan System, 
South Metropolitan System, 

Total for maintenance, both systems, 



$183,718 19 
106,628 07 



$290,346 26 



34 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



(7) Detailed Financial Statement. 
The Board herewith presents, in accordance with the Metropolitan 
Sewerage acts, an abstract of the expenditures and disbursements, 
receipts, assets and liabilities for the year ending December 31, 
1914: — 

(a) Expenditures and Disbursements. 



General Character of Expenditures. 



For the Year ending 
December 31, 1914. 



Construction op Works and Acquisition by Purchase or Taking. 

North Metropolitan System. 
Original system, main line and branches: — 
Land takings, purchase and recording,. 



North System Enlargement. 
Administration: — 

Commissioners, 

Secretary, 

Clerks and stenographers, 

Stationery, printing and office supplies, 

Telephone, lighting, heating, water and care of building, 

Repairs of building, 

Rent and taxes, main office 



Engineering: — 

Chief engineer, 

Engineering assistants, 

Inspectors, 

Traveling expenses, . . . . . . . . 

Stationery, printing and office supplies, .... 

Engineering and drafting instruments and tools, 

Engineering and drafting supplies, 

Telephone, lighting, heating, water and care of building, . 

Repairs of building, . . 

Rent and taxes, 

Miscellaneous expenses, 



Advertising, . 

Labor and teaming, . 

Tools, machinery and appliances, 

Brick, cement, lumber and other field supplies and expenses, 

Contracts: — 
William J. Barry, Contract 102 for building relocation of part of Section 30, 

Cambridge, 

Ross & Barbaro, Contract 103, for constructing Section 70 (New Mystic 

sewer) in Winchester, 

G. M. Bryne Co., Contract 104, for constructing Section 68 (New Mystic 

sewer) in Winchester, . 

Amounts carried forward, . . . 



$17 84 



$2,333 33 




375 00 




1,662 16 




350 41 




234 57 • 




1 03 




215 61 






5,172 11 




$965 29 




5,477 33 




2,786 95 




312 15 




50 76 




1 00 




12 56 




703 75 




3 07 




646 88 




435 10 






11,394 84 




$72 73 




822 87 




1 60 




2,775 93 






3,673 13 




$408 13 




9,636 55 




10,663 49 





1,708 17 



),257 92 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



35 



General Character op Expenditures. 



For the Year ending 
December 31, 1913. 



Amounts brought forward, . . . . . . . . . 

North System Enlargement — Con. 
Contracts — Con. 
Antony Cefalo, Contract 105, for constructing Section 48A in Somerville and 

Medford, 

G. M. Bryne Co., Contract 112, for constructing Section 57A of the Revere 

Extension in Chelsea and Revere, 

Henry Spinach Contracting Co., Contract 110, for constructing part of 

Section 69 (New Mystic sewer) in Winchester, 

Henry Spinach Contracting Co., Contract 111, for constructing part of 

Section 69 (New Mystic sewer) in Winchester 

Real estate: — 
Legal, conveyancing and expert, ......... 

Settlements, .............. 



Total for North Metropolitan System, 



South Metropolitan System. 

High-level Sewer. 
Engineering: — 
Engineers, inspectors, rodmen, laborers and others, 
Land takings, purchase and recording, . 

High-level Sewer Extension. 
Administration: — 

Secretary, 

Clerks and stenographers, 

Stationery, printing and office supplies, . 

Telephone, lighting, heating, water and care of building, . 

Rent and taxes, main office 

Miscellaneous expenses, 

Engineering: — 

Chief engineer, 

Engineering assistants, 

Inspectors, 

Traveling expenses, 

Stationery, printing and office supplies 

Telephone, lighting, heating, water and care of building, . 
Rent and taxes, main office, 

Advertising, 

Labor and teaming, 

Tools, machinery and appliances 

Brick, cement, lumber and other field supplies and expenses, 



Amount carried forward, 



$20,708 17 $20,257 92 



246 62 




3,005 45 




32,175 21 




46,018 97 






102,154 42 




$256 93 




5,096 25 






5,353 18 




$127,765 52 



$524 17 
5 00 



17 



$375 00 




226 67 




39 08 




39 11 




28 74 




2 27 






710 87 


$520 84 


1,476 58 




168 00 




51 10 




84 38 




112 68 




86 25 






2,499 83 




$71 13 




950 67 




835 00 




338 49 






2,195 29 





$5,93.') If. 



36 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



General Character of Expenditures. 



For the Year ending 
December 31, 1914. 



Amount brought forward, 



South Metropolitan System — Con. 

High-level Sewer Extension — Con. 
Contracts: — 
Camden Iron Works, Contract 113, for f urnishing cast-iron pipes and special 

castings, 

W. H. Ellis & Son Co., Contract 120, for constructing part of Section 43, 
Relief Outfall line of the High-level sewer in Boston Harbor, 



Total for South Metropolitan System, 



Maintenance and Operation op Works. 
North Metropolitan System. 



Administration :— 

Commissioners, 

Secretary and assistants, . . 

Rent, 

Heating, lighting and care of building, 
Repairs of building, 

Postage, 

Printing, stationery and office supplies, 

Telephones, 

Traveling expenses, . 

Miscellaneous expenses, .... 



General s ipervision : — 
Chief engineer and assistants, 

Rent, 

Heating, lighting and care of building, 
Repairs of building, . . . . 

Printing, stationery and office supplies, 
Telephones, ...... 

Traveling expenses, . . . . 

Miscellaneous expenses, . 

Deer Island pumping station: — 
Labor, 
Fuel, 

Oil and waste, 
Water, 
Packing, . 

Repairs and renewals, 
Telephones, 
General supplies, . 
Miscellaneous supplies and expenses, 



Amount carried forward, 



$17,799 90 
9,314 06 



$1,125 00 

3,550 16 

230 00 

198 68 

9 93 

61 20 

547 01 

36 04 

3 44 

43 14 



3,172 29 

690 00 

596 20 

29 83 

132 27 

108 16 

51 77 

7 00 



$18,944 81 

9,485 47 

66 91 

1,536 00 

188 29 

1,157 57 

17 10 

514 62 

683 23 



$5,935 16 



27,113 96 



!,049 12 



$5,804 60 



7,787 52 



32,594 00 



$46,186 12 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



37 



General Character of Expenditures. 



For the Year ending 
December 31, 1914. 



Amount brought forward, 



North Metropolitan System — Con. 
East Boston pumping station: — 
Labor, ......... 

Fuel, . 

Oil and waste, 

Water, 

Packing, 

Repairs and renewals, ...... 

Telephones, 

General supplies, ....... 

Miscellaneous supplies and expenses, 



Charlestown pumping station: — 
Labor, 
Fuel, 

Oil and waste, 
Water, 
Packing, . 

Repairs and renewals, 
Telephones, 
General supplies, . 
Miscellaneous supplies and expenses, 

Alewife Brook pumping station: — 
Labor, 
Fuel, 

Oil and waste, 
Water, 
Packing, . 

Repairs and renewals, 
Telephones, 
General supplies, . 
Miscellaneous supplies and expenses, 

Sewer lines, buildings and grounds: — 
Engineering assistants, . 

Labor, 

Automobiles, .... 
Brick, cement and lime, 
Castings, ironwork and metals, 
Freight, express and teaming, 
Fuel and lighting, . 
Jobbing and repairing, . 
Lumber, ..... 
Machinery, tools and appliances, 
Paint and oils, 
Rubber and oiled goods, 

Amounts carried forward, 



$22,808 87 

11,549 Gl 

543 17 

2,347 20 

70 00 

1,317 41 

9 4S 

542 98 

729 24 



$17,252 53 

4,434 15 

224 19 

764 40 

64 92 

571 20 

51 46 

417 31 

311 98 



58,605 95 

1,843 59 

224 52 

209 16 

30 31 

106 47 

40 88 

64 92 

98 31 



3,186 12 



39,917 96 



24,092 14 



11,224 11 



$3,710 04 
30,611 32 

184 73 

718 80 

683 33 

46 

29 00 

105 25 

920 07 

336 26 

346 26 

342 67 

$37,988 19 $121,420 33 



38 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



General Character of Expenditures. 



For the Year ending 
December 31, 1914. 



Amounts brought forward, . .... 

North Metropolitan System — Con. 
Sewer linea, buildings and grounds — Con. 
Sand, gravel and stone, . . . . 

Telephones, 

Traveling expenses, ...... 

General supplies, 

Miscellaneous expenses, ...... 



Horses, vehicles and stable account, 

Restoration East Boston screen-house (chapter 775, Acts of 1914): — 

Engineering, . . . . 

Labor, 

Tools, machinery and appliances, . 

Brick, cement and other supplies and expenses, 

Contracts: — 
S. H. Pomeroy Co., Inc., Contract 118, for doors, windows and monitors, 
J. Caddigan Co., Contract 121, for building new screen-house at East 

Boston pumping station, . 

E. VanNoorden & Co., Contract 119, for repairing and furnishing sky- 
lights at East Boston pumping station and locker building, . 

Payments under Industrial Accident Law and Special Benefit Appropriations, 

Total for North Metropolitan System, 



South Metropolitan System 
Administration: — 
Commissioners, .... 

Secretary and assistants, 

Rent, ...... 

Heating, lighting and care of building, 
Repairs of building, 

Postage, 

Printing, stationery and office supplies 

Telephones, 

Traveling expenses, 
Miscellaneous expenses, . 

General supervision: — 
Chief engineer and assistants, 
Rent, ....... 

Heating, lighting and care of buildings, 
Repairs of building, . 
Postage, . . . . 

Printing, stationery and office supplies, 



Amounts carried forward, 



$37,988 19 $121,420 33 



153 96 

20 95 

313 11 

793 42 

447 86 



$808 43 

5,039 25 

367 81 

1,502 75 



13,675 00 

4,250 00 

695 00 



12,333 34 

2,067 34 

215 62 

203 83 

4 41 

51 00 

448 53 

30 97 

18 00 

17 03 



},838 53 

646 88 

611 58 

13 24 

16 00 

209 92 



1,336 15 



39,717 49 
4,186 46 



7,718 24 



8,620 00 
2,055 67 



,718 19 



$5,390 07 



$5,390 07 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



39 



General Character op Expenditures. 



For the Year ending 
December 31, 1914. 



Amounts brought forward, 

South Metropolitan System — Con. 
General supervision — Con. 

Telephones, 

Traveling expenses, ...... 

Miscellaneous expenses, ...... 



Ward Street pumping station: — 
Labor, 
Fuel, 

Oil and waste, 
Water, 
Packing, . 

Repairs and renewals, 
Telephones, 
General supplies, . 
Miscellaneous supplies and expenses, 



Quincy pumping station: — 
Labor, 

Fuel, . . . 
Oil and waste, 
Water, 
Packing, . 

Repairs and renewals, 
Telephones, 
General supplies, . 
Miscellaneous supplies and expenses 



Nut Island screen-house: — 
Labor, 
Fuel, 

Oil and waste, 
Water, 
Packing, . 

Repairs and renewals, 
Telephones, 
General supplies, . 
Miscellaneous supplies and expenses, 



Sewer lines, buildings and grounds* 
Engineering assistants, . 
Labor, ..... 

Automobiles 

Brick, cement and lime, 
Castings, ironwork and metals, 
Fuel and lighting, . 
Jobbing and repairing, . 

Amounts carried forward, 



$4,336 15 



92 93 

25 00 

6 50 



$23,499 82 

10,522 87 

230 47 

1,528 80 

268 43 

2,496 83 

49 13 

1,250 52 

268 99 



$8,178 92 

2,040 65 

64 27 

212 23 

29 74 

249 75 

35 28 

343 42 

37 75 



18,260 93 

2,496 12 

131 08 

318 95 

19 93 

44 20 

46 18 

493 83 

165 27 



$4,050 46 

17,311 16 

204 34 

246 18 

139 86 

71 25 

17 25 



5,390 07 



4,460 58 



40,115 86 



11,192 01 



11,976 49 



$22,040 50 $73,135 01 



40 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



General Character of Expenditures. 



For the Year ending 
December 31, 1914. 



Amounts brought forward, 



South Metropolitan System — ■ Con. 
Sewer lines, buildings and grounds — Con. 
Lumber, ..... 
Machinery, tools and appliances, 
Paints and oils, 
Rubber and oiled goods, 
Sand, gravel and stone, . 
Telephones, 
Traveling expenses, 
General supplies, . 
Miscellaneous expenses, . 

City of Boston, for pumping and interest, 
Horses, vehicles and stable account, 

Total for South Metropolitan System, 



$22,040 50 $73,135 01 



297 36 

528 96 

137 43 

123 28 

164 25 
33 40 

546 11 

251 71 

150 61 

24,273 61 

6,423 73 
2,795 72 



$106,628 07 



(b) Receipts. 

The receipts from the sales of property, from rents and from other 
sources, have been credited as follows: — 



Account. 



For the 
Year ending 
December 31, 
1914. . 



Construction: — 
North Metropolitan System, 
South Metropolitan System, 

Maintenance: — 

North Metropolitan System, 
South Metropolitan System, 



$184 20 
10 66 

356 39 
172 48 



Amount credited from beginning of work to January 1, 1914, 
Total receipts to January 1, 1915, .... 



$723 71 
120,161 30 



$120,885 01 



(c) Assets. 

The following is an abstract of the assets of the Sewerage Works, 
a complete schedule of which is kept on file in the office of the 
Board: — 

Office furniture, fixtures and supplies; engineering and scientific instruments 
and supplies; horses, vehicles, field machinery, etc.; machinery, tools and 
other appliances and supplies; completed works, real estate connected 
therewith. 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



41 



(d) Liabilities. 

There are bills for current expenses which have not yet been 
received. 

Amounts on Monthly Estimates, not due until Completion of Contracts or until 

Claims are settled. 



Name. 


Work. 


Amount. 


High-level Sewer: — 
National Contracting Co., 
E. W. Everson & Co., 

High-level Sewer Extension : — 
Timothy J. O'Connell, 
W. H. Ellis & Son Co., 

North Metropolitan Construction: — 
G. M. Byrne Co., .... 
Henry Spinach Contracting Co., 

Henry Spinach Contracting Co., 

North Metropolitan Maintenance: — ■ 
J. Caddigan Co., .... 


Section 73, Contract abandoned, 

Section 82, in part, Contract 57, . . 
Section 43, in part, Relief Outfall line, Contract 
120, 

Section 57A, Revere Extension, Contract 112, 
Section 69, in part (New Mystic sewer), Con- 
tract 110, 

Section 69, in part (New Mystic sewer), Con- 
New screen-house at East Boston pumping sta- 
tion, Contract 121, 


$5,516 17i 
1,000 00 

60 00 
1,643 66 

158 18 
5,677 97 
8,120 98 

750 00 



1 Damages claimed by the Commonwealth on account of the abandonment of the contract exceed 
this amount. 

Claims have been made by the following parties for land taken 
and other damages, and suits are now pending in the courts for the 
determination of many of them : — ■ 

Anna L. Dunican, Carrie S. Urquhart, N. Jefferson Urquhart, 
Edwin N. Urquhart, Richard Jones, James Doherty, Michael Niland, 
William H. Gibbons, Francis Normile, Boston & Maine Railroad, 
Elizabeth Clark, Edward F. Mills, Hermon W. Pratt. 



VIII. RECOMMENDATIONS FOR LEGISLATION. 

In the abstract of the annual report for the year 1914 the Board 
made the following statement and recommendations: — 

On the first day of June, 1914, an explosion took place in the screen-house of 
the East Boston sewerage pumping station which completely destroyed that 
portion of the station and caused the death of six men and the serious injury 
of two others. 

A careful examination of all the conditions surrounding this accident satisfied 
this Board that the presence of gasolene in the sewers was immediately responsible 
for the explosion, and it was also evident that the sewers in close connection witli 
the pumping station on the east side of Chelsea Creek in East Boston contained 



42 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

the largest quantity of this dangerous element. All the usual precautions had 
been taken in the presence of this ever present danger, and this Board cannot 
look forward to any adequate protection against its recurrence until some 
additional legislation gives to the Board the power to regulate the conditions 
under which waste matters are discharged into such local sewers as ultimately 
discharge into the Metropolitan sewer. 

The reconstruction of the screen-house was immediately undertaken and is 
now approaching completion. Every effort has been made to arrange the details 
of operation in it so that the recurrence of such explosions may be rendered less 
probable. 

It may be remarked in this connection that accidents of this sort have occurred 
in several American cities, in some instances attended with much greater de- 
struction of property but in no case with so large a loss of human life. 

In order to give the Board sufficient control over the nature of the sewage 
received by the Metropolitan sewers, it is respectfully suggested that a slight 
change be made in the language of section 9 of chapter 439 of the Acts of the 
year 1889 and section 8 of chapter 424 of the Acts of the year 1899, so that 
these sections may read : Any city or town within whose limits any main sewer 
shall have been constructed under the provisions of this act shall connect its 
local sewers with such main sewer and use the same, subject to the direction, 
control and regulation of said board, and any person, firm or corporation may, 
subject to the direction, control and regulation from time to time of said board, 
and subject to such terms, conditions and regulations as each city or town may 
prescribe, connect private drains with said main sewer. 

When the explosion took place in the screen-house of the East Boston pumping 
station the damage to the structures underlying the pumping station was 
assumed by the engineers in charge of the works to be much larger than it was 
found to be when it was possible to make a proper examination of their con- 
dition after the removal of the ruined structure. In consequence, the appro- 
priation of $35,000 for this work was larger than we have found to be necessary 
for the reconstruction of the building, and we have a balance on hand of $13,000 
now chargeable to the maintenance account of the North Metropolitan Sewerage 
District. Certain changes have been made in other portions of the sewerage 
system of the North Metropolitan District which involve an expense greater 
than the amounts already appropriated, but this amount would be no greater 
than the $13,000, being the unexpended balance of the $35,000 appropriated 
for the repairs at East Boston. We therefore recommend that this amount be 
transferred from the maintenance account of the North Metropolitan District 
to the construction account of the North Metropolitan District. 

When the work was planned for the extension of the South Metropolitan 
Sewer by an additional outlet at Nut Island, the Board's plan at that time 
contemplated simply an extension to low-water mark. The State Board of 
Health, under whose general control the extensions of the sewerage systems 
have been made into the tidal waters of Boston Harbor, insisted upon a more 
distant outlet, and an additional appropriation to meet the expense occasioned 
by this change in the Nut Island outlet will have to be made. The Board esti- 
mates the expense of such change at the sum of $5,000. 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 43 

The detailed reports of the Chief Engineer of the Water Works 
and of the Engineer of the Sewerage W 7 orks, with various tables 
and statistics, are herewith presented. 

Respectfully submitted, 

henry p. walcott, 
edward a. Mclaughlin, 
thomas e. dwyer, 

Metropolitan Water and Sewerage Board. 
Boston, February 19, 1915. 



44 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 



REPORT OF CHIEF ENGINEER OF WATER WORKS. 



To the Metropolitan Water and Sewerage Board. 

Gentlemen: — The following is a report of the work done under 
the direction of the Chief Engineer of the Metropolitan Water 
Works in connection with the construction, maintenance and opera- 
tion of the works controlled by the Metropolitan Water and Sewerage 
Board and used for supplying water to the Metropolitan Water 
District. 

Organization. 

The Chief Engineer has had the following assistants : — 

William E. Foss, Assistant to Chief Engineer. 

Elliot R. B. Allardice, .... Superintendent of Wachusett De- 
partment. 

Charles E. Haberstroh, . . . Superintendent of Sudbury Depart- 

ment. 

Samuel E. Killam, ..... Superintendent of Pipe Lines and 

Reservoirs, Distribution Depart- 
ment. 

Arthur E. O'Neil, Superintendent of Pumping Stations, 

Distribution Department. 

Alfred 0. Doane, Division Engineer, specially in charge 

of engineering work at pumping 
stations. 

Clifford Foss, Assistant Engineer. 

Benjamin F. Hancox, .... Assistant in charge of Drafting De- 
partment. 

James W. Killam, ..... Assistant Engineer, in charge of tests 

of coal and oil. 

William E. Whittaker, . . . Office assistant. 

Charles E. Livermore, .... Biologist. 

William W. Locke, Sanitary Inspector. 

These, together with other assistant engineers, instrumentmen, 
office assistants, stenographers, clerks and messengers, have consti- 
tuted a force averaging 43 for the year. 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



45 



The number of men exclusive of the engineering force above 
mentioned who have been employed in operating the pumping 
stations, in maintaining the reservoirs, aqueducts and pipe lines, and 
in doing minor construction work, has been as follows : — 



Beginning 
of Year. 



End of Year. 



Average. 



Wachusett Department, 

Sudbury Department, . 

Distribution Department, pipe lines and reservoirs, 

Distribution Department, pumping stations, 



40 
49 
80 
56 



225 



42 
55 
82 
57 



236 



51 

57 
83 
57 



248 



CONSTRUCTION. 
Water Pipe Tunnel under Chelsea Creek. 

The Legislature of 1913 appropriated $75,000 for the construction 
of a tunnel under Chelsea Creek between Chelsea and East Boston 
in which to place a 42-inch cast-iron water main for use in supplying 
water to the East Boston district. After this is done the two 24- 
inch pipe lines now used, which are laid a few feet below the bed of 
the creek, are to be removed in order that they may not interfere 
with the deepening of the channel by the United States Government. 
Preliminary borings and plans for the tunnel work were prepared in 
1913. The plan received the approval of the Secretary of War on 
June 17, 1914. A contract for the construction of the tunnel and 
its approaches and for laying the pipes was made with Coleman 
Brothers of Chelsea on April 27, and the work will be completed 
early in 1915. The work embraces the construction, under pneu- 
matic pressure, of a brick-lined tunnel 8.5 feet in exterior diameter, 
640 feet long, in which is laid a 42-inch diameter cast-iron pipe with 
a space between the exterior of the pipe and the interior of the 
tunnel and shafts, filled with concrete masonry. 

The axis of the horizontal portion of the tunnel is 43 feet below 
mean low water, and the vertical shafts, which extend 15 feet above 
Boston City Base, are 524 feet from centre to centre. The upper 
portion of each shaft is encased in sheet steel J an inch in thickness 
for a distance of 27 feet, extending into the mud bottom of the 
channel. The Chelsea shaft is located 175 feet from Marginal 
Street. A bulkhead about 100 feet long has been built across the 



46 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

end of the dock just outside of this shaft, and the property of the 
Board between the bulkhead and Marginal Street filled to elevation 
16 along the centre of the lot, sloping to elevation 12 along the sides. 

The contractor began work May 5, placed the steel casing sections 
of the shafts in position on June 23, and began work under com- 
pressed air at the Chelsea shaft on June 26. The construction of the 
tunnel and shafts was carried on continuously with a force of 45 
men, working in three 8-hour shifts, until November 18, when the 
tunnel was completed, the air pressure was removed and the work of 
laying the 42-inch pipe begun. Pipe laying and the placing of con- 
crete between the pipe and sides of the tunnel continued during 
December, and was finished on December 31. 

The work remaining to be done consists of making connections 
with existing mains in Chelsea and East Boston, removing the exist- 
ing pipes in the channel and completing minor details. The amount 
expended on account of the work to December 31, 1914, was $55,- 
229.66. 

Additional 24-inch Main in Milton and Quincy. 

The Legislature of 1914 authorized the laying of a 24-inch pipe 
from the Lower Mills in Dorchester, through Adams Street in Milton 
and Quincy to the junction of Adams and Beale streets, a distance 
of 13,000 feet. The pipes have been furnished by the Warren 
Foundry & Machine Company of Phillipsburg, N. J., at $20.50 per 
ton, and the valves by the Coffin Valve Company of Boston. A 
contract for laying the pipes was made on August 4 with John J. 
Evans of Lawrence, who began work on August 12, and at the end 
of the year had laid 9,850 feet of pipe, extending through Adams 
Street from Beale Street, in Quincy, to Hutchinson Street in Milton, 
the amount of work done being equivalent to 77 per cent, of the 
total. The greater portion of the new line was placed in service on 
November 8. 

This pipe line is being laid to reinforce the existing single 24-inch 
main in case of extraordinary draft or in case of accident. 

New High-service Reservoir and Force Main. 
The reservoir or standpipe on Bellevue Hill in West Roxbury, 
which has been used in connection with the pumping station at 
Hyde Park in supplying water to the higher lands in West Roxbury, 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 47 

Hyde Park and Milton, has a storage capacity of but 135,000 gallons. 
For the purpose of providing more adequate storage, the construction 
of a larger reservoir, with a capacity of 2,500,000 gallons, and the 
completion of a 20-inch pipe line between the pumping station and 
the reservoir, was authorized under chapter 601 of the acts of 1914. 
The pipes for the force main were purchased in June from the 
Warren Foundry & Machine Company, and a contract for laying 
them was made with the Charles R. Gow Company on August 7. 
Work w T as begun August 13, completed November 5, and included 
the laying of 4,966 feet of 20-inch pipe and 391 feet of 16, 12 and 
6-inch pipe for drains and connections. The value of the work 
done under this contract was $6,898.29. 

A contract for making the necessary excavation for and placing 
the concrete in the foundation for the reservoir was made with John 
E. Palmer of Boston on August 4. The concrete base on which 
the steel tank rests is 117 feet 6 inches in diameter, 2 feet 8 inches 
thick for a width of 7 feet at the circumference, 3 feet thick under 
six columns which will support the roof, and 12 inches thick under the 
remainder of the tank. The earth below the concrete is a clayey, 
gravelly hard pan. Work under this contract, which amounted to 
$6,382.28, was completed on October 7. 

A contract for the steel tank for the reservoir was made with 
Walsh's Holyoke Steam Boiler Works, of Holyoke, on August 7 for 
$19,397. The work of erecting the tank was begun on October 10 
and was practically finished at the end of the year, although the 
tank has not yet been filled with water for test. The tank is 100 
feet in diameter, with bottom composed of steel plates f of an inch 
in thickness, 20 feet long and 8 feet wide. The sides of the tank 
are 44 feet 3 inches high, composed of seven courses of alternating 
inner and outer plates varying in thickness from f to f of an inch. 
The junction of the bottom and sides of the tank is made with a 
6-inch x 3J-inch x J-inch angle on the inside, and the top edge of 
the tank is stiffened with a 3-inch x f-inch Z bar on the inside. 
The circumferential joints are double riveted and the vertical joints 
are butted and secured together with inside and outside straps. 
The tank is fitted with an overflow weir 5 feet long, set at elevation 
375 above Boston City Base and 1 foot 3 inches below the top of the 
tank. The steel plates for the tank were furnished by the Lukens 
Iron & Steel Company under . specifications which require a tensile 



48 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

strength of between 57,000 and 62,000 pounds per square inch, and 
chemical requirements in accordance with the specifications of the 
American Society for Testing Materials. All rivet holes in plates 
more than f of an inch thick were punched at least T6 of an inch 
smaller than the finished diameter, and reamed after the plates were 
erected and bolted in place. The bottom of the tank and one course 
of the side plates were erected upon blocking and then lowered into 
final position by means of screw jacks placed around the outside 
edge and through five holes cut in the bottom plates. After this 
was done the space under the bottom of the tank was filled with 
cement grout mixed in the proportion of 1 part Portland cement, 1 
part fine sand and 2 J parts of water by volume. The grout was 
mixed in steel tanks, stirred with compressed air and poured through 
66 1-inch diameter holes in the tank bottom, which were afterward 
plugged. This part of the work cost $1,053.67, and in doing it 222 
barrels of cement and 33 cubic yards of sand were used. 

The completed reservoir will include a granite masonry tower 
surrounding and enclosing the tank. This portion of the work is 
to be done during the coming year. 

The amount expended on account of the reservoir and force main 
to December 31 was $46,320.64. 

60-inch Supply Main from the Weston Aqueduct. 
Under authority granted in 1909, the Board in the years 1909 and 
1910 constructed 20,255 feet of this main, extending from a point 
on Commonwealth Avenue near Valentine Street, in Newton, to 
Cleveland Circle near Chestnut Hill Reservoir, and the completion 
of the line to the Charles River, a further distance of 14,474 feet, 
was at that time deferred. As it appeared to be an opportune time 
for the completion of the work, contracts for furnishing the pipes 
and special castings required were made on November 25 and 28 
with the United States Cast Iron Pipe & Foundry Company, of 
Philadelphia, for $19.60 per ton for the pipes and $49 per ton for 
the special castings. These contracts will amount to about $143,000. 
About 240 tons of the pipes had been delivered at the close of the 
year. Contracts for laying the pipes will be made early in the com- 
ing season. 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 49 

Sale of Power at the Sudbury Dam. 

Chapter 601 of the Acts of 1914 authorized the expenditure of 
$80,000 in constructing a hydro-electric plant at the Sudbury Dam, 
in Southborough, to be used in developing electric energy and thus 
conserving the power in the water used, previous to its use in the 
Metropolitan District. 

Before installing the necessary machinery it was deemed expedient 
to make a contract for the sale of the energy. Bids were received 
on September 2, and a contract has been made with the Edison 
Electric Illuminating Company of Boston, which provides that for 
a term of Hve years that Company will take and pay $6.25 per 
thousand kilowatt hours for all energy delivered to its lines at a 
point near the Sudbury Dam. Plans and specifications for the con- 
struction and installation of the necessary machinery are now 
practically finished and proposals will soon be received for doing the 
work. 

Payment by City of Worcester for Taking of Water from 

Wachusett Watershed. 

Your engineer, together with Mr. F. A. McClure, City Engineer 
of the City of Worcester, acting under authority given by chapter 
456 of the Acts of the year 1897 and chapter 351 of the year 1902, 
have determined that the city of Worcester shall pay to the Com- 
monwealth of Massachusetts the sum of $164,000 on account of its 
taking on August 1, 1911, of the waters of Asnebumskit Brook and 
Kendall Reservoir, which together form ttfi"9 of the watershed of 
the South Branch of the Nashua River, the rights in which had 
been previously acquired by this Board in behalf of the Common- 
wealth. It was further determined that subsequent to August 1, 
1911, the city of Worcester should pay annually the same proportion 
of the cost of constructing, maintaining and operating the Clinton 
sewage disposal works, and should be paid the same proportion of 
any amounts which may be received at any time from the sale of 
said works. It was also further determined that until such time as 
an additional source of water supply embracing more than 25 square 
miles is obtained for the Metropolitan District, the Metropolitan 
Water and Sewerage Board shall pay to the city of Worcester $2 for 
each million gallons of water discharged into the watershed of the 



50 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



Wachusett Reservoir from the watersheds of Asnebumskit Brook 
and the Kendall Reservoir between June 15 and December 15 of 
any year, or for all water so discharged during any portion of any 
year in which the water in the Wachusett Reservoir does not rise 
to elevation 395 above Boston City Base before June 15. 

MAINTENANCE. 
Rainfall and Yield of Watersheds. 

The rainfall in the eastern portion of Massachusetts during the 
past year has been about 7 inches below the average of the previous 
40 years. The rainfall was above the average during the first six 
months of the year, but below the average during the latter portion 
of the year. The past year was the seventh successive year when 
the rainfall and yield were below the average. 

Storage Reservoirs. 

The following table shows the total capacity of the several stor- 
age reservoirs and the elevation of and quantity of water stored in 
each at the beginning and end of the year : — 





Capacity 
(Gallons). 


Jan. 1, 1914. 


Jan. 1, 1915. * 


Storage Reservoirs. 


Eleva- 
tion 1 

of 
Water 
Surface. 


Amount 

stored 
(Gallons). 


Eleva- 
tion 1 

of 
Water 

Surface . 


Amount 

stored 
(Gallons). 


Cochituate watershed: — 












Lake Cochituate, including Dudley 
Pond. 
Sudbury watershed: — 


2,328,300,000 
* 


143.51 


2,043,900,000 


142.62 


1,825,000,000 


Sudbury Reservoir, 


7,253,500,000 


258.75 


6,731,400,000 


257.81 


6,343,900,000 


Framingham Reservoir No. 1, 


287,500,000 


167.80 


220,400,000 


167.66 


214,400,000 


Framingham Reservoir No. 2, 


529,900,000 


177.33 


538,900,000 


175.98 


480,900,000 


Framingham Reservoir No. 3, 


1,180,000,000 


183.00 


900,500,000 


183.03 


902,900,000 


Ashland Reservoir, 


1,416,400,000 


225.13 


1,412,000,000 


224.34 


1,368,500,000 


Hopkinton Reservoir, . 


. 1,520,900,000 


304.81 


1,508,900,000 


304.05 


1,461,500,000 


Whitehall Reservoir, 


1,256,900,000 


337.60 


1,196,300,000 


337.66 


1,208,000,000 


Farm Pond, ..... 


167,500,000 


158.46 


125,400,000 


158.66 


136,000,000 


Wachusett watershed: — 












Wachusett Reservoir, 


64,968,000,000- 


387.48 


55,146,300,000 


381.89 


48,438,100,000 


Totals 


80,908,900,000 


- 


69,824,000,000 


- 


62,379,200,000 



Elevation in feet above Boston City Base. 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 51 

The diagram on the following page shows the quantity of water 
stored in the Wachusett Reservoir, also in all the storage reservoirs 
combined at different periods during the year. All of the reservoirs, 
with the exception of the Wachusett Reservoir, have been substan- 
tially full throughout the year. 

Wachusett Reservoir. — Eighty-six per cent, of the water used in 
the Metropolitan District was drawn from this reservoir. It was 
7.52 feet below high water on January 1, rose rapidly during March, 
and reached its greatest elevation for the year on April 1, when it 
was 395.43. Water was wasted from the reservoir into the river 
below the dam from March 29 to June 2, the total quantity wasted 
being 11,152,700,000 gallons. The reservoir remained full until 
June 13, and after that time fell at the rate of approximately 2 
feet per month until the end of the year, when it was 13 feet below 
high water, and lower than it had been since December, 1911. 

In compliance with the requirements of chapter 488 of the Acts 
of the year 1895, 1,043,700,000 gallons of water were discharged 
into the Nashua River below the dam, at the rate of not less than 
12,000,000 gallons per week, for the use of the -Lancaster Mills. 

Soil has been removed from strips of land along both the north- 
erly and southerly shores of the reservoir where the action of the 
waves had caused the banks to retreat beyond the limits of previ- 
ous stripping. This work was carried on for an aggregate distance 
of 7,530 feet, in widths varying from 10 to 50 feet, the area stripped 
being 2.9 acres. 

The area of the bottom of the reservoir which is exposed when the 
water is lowered 12 feet below high water is about 550 acres. During 
the latter portion of each year a large part of this area is exposed, and 
during the past seven years portions of this area have gradually 
become covered with a light vegetable growth which had an un- 
sightly appearance. This growth has been removed from 266 
acres of this area during the past year by harrowing the ground, 
raking up and burning or otherwise removing the debris. Drift- 
wood or other debris brought into the reservoir by the spring 
freshets has also been removed. 

All of the work above described was done at a cost of $3,515.32, 
and was nearly all done between August 17 and November 7. 

Fills, composed of soil faced with gravel, were constructed when 
the reservoir was built near the former locations of the Clarendon 



52 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



DIAGRAM SHOWING 

QUANTITY OF WATER STORED IN THE WACHU5ETT RESERVOIR 
AND IN ALL THE STORAGE RESERVOIRS COMBINED 

DURING 1914 

JAN. FEB. MAR. APR. MAY JUN. JUL. AUG. SEP. OCT. NOV. DEC. 

82, ,000 



80,000 




52,000 



50,000 



48,000 



78,000 



76.000 



74,000 



72,000 



70,000 



68,000 


en 

c 




o 


66,000 


(D 




o 


64.000 






c 


62,000 


o 


60,000 


i 


58.000 





JAN. FEB MAR. APR. MAY JUN. JUL AUG SEP OCT. NOV. DEC. 



56.000 



54.000 



52.000 



50,000 



48.000 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 53 

and Sawyer's Mills on the northerly shore of the reservoir. As the 
exposed gravel facing of these fills has been removed by wave 
action they have been protected during the past year, near high- 
water line, with a paving of field stones 12 inches to 15 inches in 
thickness. The fill near Sawyer's Mills was protected in this man- 
ner for a length of 2,055 feet, and the Clarendon Mills fill for a dis- 
tance of 615 feet. The total amount done at both places was 2,434 
square yards at a cost of $786.71, or 32 cents per square yard. 

Additional riprap protection was placed for 1,750 feet on the 
easterly shore of the reservoir south of the dam and for a length 
of 260 feet just west of the southerly end of the South Dike, be- 
tween November 5 and December 5, at a cost of $837.45. 

The brush and weeds have been mowed, raked up and burned 
from the face and riprap berm of the North and South dikes, from 
the sides of brooks leading into the reservoir, and from all highways 
facing the property of the Board. This work extended over 24 
miles. The standing and rowen grass on 404 acres of the marginal 
lands was sold for $3,165. 

The two houses remaining in Boylston on the northerly side of the 
reservoir, which have been occupied by employees of the Board, 
have been sold, upon condition that they be removed from the town. 
At the Tucker house, near Boylston Centre, an artesian well 84 
feet deep has been installed at a cost of $241.29, for the purpose of 
securing a non-failing supply of water. The houses on Wilson 
Street, near the Wachusett Dam, have been reshingled, repaired 
and externally painted. 

Wachusett Bam. — The dam, with the adjacent structures and 
grounds, is in good condition. The sidewalk curbing, extending for 
445 feet along Boylston Street, has been reset. The granite steps 
and granolithic landings on the slopes leading up the hillsides have 
been rejointed where necessary. A gravel foot-path 1,600 feet long 
has been built along the southerly side of the waste channel. Four- 
teen hundred white pine seedlings have been set out in the vicinity 
of the garage, along the banks of the waste channel, and on the 
shore of the reservoir west of the dam. 

An electrically operated appliance for opening and closing the 8 
sluice gates which control the discharge from the reservoir has been 
installed at a cost of $262.51. The apparatus consists of a 5 horse- 
power Westinghouse motor, attached to the traveling crane in the 



54 . METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

gate chamber in such a manner that the motor can be used inter- 
changeably to operate any of the gates. 

The piping and valves which control the operation of the 48- 
inch gates on the pipes leading to the pool below the dam have 
been brought above the main floor of the power station so as to be 
more conveniently accessible in case of emergency. This work cost 
$266.67. 

Sudbury Reservoir. — During the early portion of the year the 
water in this reservoir was kept near the elevation of the stone 
crest of the dam, but after the middle of April flash-boards were 
placed on the crest and the water raised to high-water mark. The 
flash-boards were removed on November 28 and on January 1, 
1915, the reservoir was 1.19 feet below the stone crest of the over- 
flow. 

The location of the entrance from the Framingham-Marlborough 
road to the dam has been changed for a distance of 305 feet from 
the street, so as to afford convenient entrance for automobiles 
from either direction. The reconstruction of the driveway and 
shrubbery beds necessitated by this change has improved the ap- 
pearance of the entrance. 

Minor repairs to houses owned by the Board at Fayville and 
Marlborough have been made. The shores of the reservoir and the 
grounds at the dam have received the necessary attention and are 
in good condition. 

Framingham Reservoirs Nos. 1 and 2. — No water was drawn dur- 
ing the year from these reservoirs for the use of the Metropolitan 
District, and they remained substantially full throughout the year. 
On November 11 and 12 water was drawn from both of these reser- 
voirs for the purpose of filling Farm Pond. A wire fence has been 
built for a length of 265 feet along the property line of the Board 
on the southerly side of Fountain street. 

Framingham Reservoir N.o. 3. — About 64 per cent, of the supply 
furnished to the Metropolitan District passed through this reservoir. 
Its surface was kept about 3J feet below high water during January 
and February, after which it was allowed to rise to high-water 
mark in April and May, so that small quantities of water were 
wasted into Framingham Reservoir No. 1 during 15 days in April 
and 8 days in May. During the remainder of the year the reser- 
voir was kept from 2 to 2J feet below high-water mark. 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 55 

Several parcels of land aggregating 20.94 acres have been pur- 
chased for the purpose of widening the property of the Board along 
the shores of this reservoir, thus affording better protection from 
pollution for the water. 

A wire fence 489 feet long was built between land thus acquired 
and land of Andrew O. Stensson on the west side of the Framing- 
ham-Marlborough road. Six points have been marked on the bound- 
ary lines of the Water Works lands at this reservoir. 

Miscellaneous Work in Cedar Swamp. — Considerable work has 
been done in connection with the determination and marking of the 
boundary lines of the Metropolitan Water Works lands in Cedar 
Swamp and along the Sudbury River to Framingham Reservoir No. 
2, and 235 points on these boundary lines have been permanently 
marked. The trees and brush have been cut and removed along 
the property lines in Cedar Swamp for a width of 5 feet and a 
distance of 28,374 feet. Three hundred and forty-five feet of wire 
fence have been built and 300 feet of stone wall repaired between 
land of the Board and Harry F. Rogers. 

Ashland, Hopkinton and Whitehall Reservoirs. — No water was 
drawn from any of these reservoirs for the supply of the Metropoli- 
tan District. Both the Ashland and Hopkinton reservoirs were 
lowered about 2 feet below the stone crests of the Wastewavs in 
March, in order to provide storage in case of freshets. They refilled 
before April 1 and during the remainder of the year all three of the 
reservoirs remained substantially full. 

The grounds at the several dams have received the usual atten- 
tion and are in good condition. 

Four points on the boundary lines of the Water Works lands at 
the head of Hopkinton Reservoir have been permanently marked, 
and 29 at the Ashland Reservoir. A wire fence was built on the 
north side of the property line below the Ashland Dam, extending 
920 feet westerly from Chestnut Street. The supply of water to the 
attendant's house at this reservoir has been improved by laying a 
lj-inch diameter galvanized iron pipe 360 feet long between the 
house and the reservoir. The end of the pipe was carried 22 feet 
below high water in the reservoir. 

Between December 19 and 22 the town of Hopkinton pumped 
about 180,000 gallons of water from Whitehall Fond to replenish 
the supply in the local standpipe of the town. 



56 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

Lanes 5 feet in width were cut along the property lines between 
the land of the Board and adjoining owners at the Hopkinton 
Reservoir for a distance of 5,880 feet, and at Whitehall Reservoir 
for a distance of 13,218 feet. 

During the year five summer cottages were taken down near the 
Whitehall Reservoir and none built, leaving 56 now located near 
the shores. The number of boats, of all kinds used on Whitehall 
Reservoir is now 113, or 16 less than one year ago. 

Farm Pond. — The town of Framingham drew 252,900,000 gal- 
lons of water from the filtering gallery which is maintained along- 
side the pond, and 41,400,000 gallons from the Sudbury Aqueduct 
directly to its pumps. The pond was replenished by a flow amount- 
ing to 109,600,000 gallons, drawn from Framingham Reservoirs 
Nos. 1 and 2 on November 11 and 12. 

Permission has been given the town of Framingham to use about 
2.3 acres of land, extending about 1,300 feet along the westerly 
shore of the pond as a playground in connection with adjacent 
land owned by the town. 

Lake Cochituate. — No water for the use of the Metropolitan 
District was drawn from the lake. The property of the Board 
surrounding the lake has received the usual care, the debris has 
been removed from the shores; the channels and sand catcher on 
the surface drainage system from Cochituate Village have been 
cleaned and repaired, and the lake and grounds are now in good 
condition. 

Sources from which Water for the Supply of the Metro- 
politan District has been taken. 
A daily average of 92,420,000 gallons of water was drawn from 
the Wachusett Reservoir into the Sudbury Reservoir. Water for 
use in the Metropolitan District was drawn as follows : — 

Daily Average 
Gallons. 

From the Sudbury Reservoir through the Weston Aqueduct, . 37,643,000 
From Framingham Reservoir No. 3 through the Sudbury Aque- 
duct, ' 67,564,000 

From the drainage area of Spot Pond, -. 213,000 

Total, ' 105,420,000 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 57 

Aqueducts. 

The Wachusett Aqueduct carried water during the whole or a 
portion of 291 days. The total quantity conveyed was 33,800,200,000 
gallons, of which amount 66,749,000 gallons, equivalent to 183,000 
gallons per day, was taken for the Westborough State Hospital, 
and the remainder delivered into the Sudbury Reservoir. 

During the month of September the bottom and side slopes of 
the open channel, extending up-stream 2,900 feet from the upper 
dam, were thoroughly cleaned by the removal of water grass, weeds 
and muck, which had accumulated during the 16 years since the 
aqueduct was placed in service. This work cost $329.21. At the 
same time the masonry of the upper dam, Stone's bridge and the 
retaining walls of the terminal chamber were repointed. 

Electrically welded wire fencing, erected in 1897, was replaced by 
a No. 65 Wheelock wire fence for a distance of 1,125 feet along the 
north side of the open channel just above the upper dam, at a 
cost of $201.37, and 7,882 feet of board fencing on both sides of 
the aqueduct between Derby Road and Linden Street, in Berlin, 
was replaced with the same pattern of wire fence, at a cost of 
$970.48. An area of 11 \ acres in Marlborough and Northborough, 
lying on the south side of the open channel and about J of a mile 
below the terminal chamber, has been cleared of oak, birch, apple 
and chestnut trees which were badly infested with moths. This 
work cost $834.97, which was reduced by $196 received for wood 
sold. About If acres of land west of the terminal chamber has been 
filled and graded at a cost of $329.80, and the appearance of the 
property improved. 

The aqueduct embankment in Berlin has been regraded, fertilized 
with super-phosphate and muriate of potash, planted with witch 
grass and seeded for a distance of 860 linear feet, covering f of an 
acre, at a cost of $211.62. 

Eight hundred white pine seedlings were set out on the south side 
of the open channel for a distance of 1,500 feet. 

At the Assabet Bridge where the aqueduct crosses the Assabet 
River, a few small leaks have developed through the masonry, 
which would indicate that the lead lining at this place is perforated. 
A careful examination of the interior of the aqueduct has disclosed 
fine cracks through the brickwork, but it has not yet been deter- 



58 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

mined whether these cracks extend through the lead lining. The 
amount of water lost by leakage is inconsiderable, but the freezing 
of the moisture in the seams of the masonry would in time disin- 
tegrate the structure and repairs will be necessary in the near 
future. 

The Sudbury Aqueduct was used every day in the year. On 
November 11 and 12 it was used for carrying 109,600,000 gallons of 
water from Framingham Reservoirs Nos. 1 and 2 to Farm Pond. 
The remainder of the time it was in constant use conveying a daily 
average of 67,564,000 gallons to Chestnut Hill Reservoir. 

Fences, having two 2-inch x 6-inch spruce rails, have been built 
for an aggregate length of 887 feet, and minor repairs have been 
made to several of the structures connected with the aqueduct. 

A fire occurred in the east siphon chamber of this aqueduct on 
August 23, which destroyed 27 stop-planks and slightly injured the 
interior of the building. It is supposed to have been caused by 
boys and to have been of careless or incendiary origin. 

Manhole covers, iron doors and other portions of structures along 
the aqueduct have been painted. 

Along the Cochituate Aqueduct the culverts and other structures 
connected with the aqueduct have been kept in repair and the 
aqueduct has been maintained in readiness for use, but no water 
was drawn through it during the year. 

The Weston Aqueduct was in continuous use and carried a daily 
average of 37,643,000 gallons from the Sudbury Reservoir to the 
Metropolitan District. About 238,000 square feet of the embank- 
ments of this aqueduct was dressed with loam and chemical fer- 
tilizer, and 4,442 feet of cable wire fencing which had been destroyed 
by iron rust was replaced with No. 65 Wheelock wire fencing. The 
masonry has been repointed where necessary at gaging chamber 
No. 1, at the culverts at Angelico Brook, Baiting Brook, west of 
Millwood Street and near the east portal of tunnel No. 2. The 
exterior of the house occupied by one of the Board's employees at 
Nobscot, the woodwork at siphon chamber No. 4 and gaging cham- 
bers Nos. 1 and 2 and the manhole covers and iron fence of the 
bridge over the Sudbury River have been painted. 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



59 



Pumping Stations. 

Sixty-five per cent, of the water supplied to the Metropolitan 
District has been pumped at the two stations at Chestnut Hill 
Reservoir, and the remainder has been delivered by gravity. The 
total quantity pumped at the five stations was 28,731,160,000 gal- 
lons, which was 0.2 per cent, more than in 1913. The cost of oper- 
ating the stations was $104,806.20, equivalent to $3,648 per million 
gallons pumped. The cost per million gallons shows an increase of 
$0,224, due entirely to an increase in the cost of repairs. 

Coal for use at the several stations has been delivered into the 
bins as follows: — 





Gross Tons. 


.3 

d 
o 
H 

m 

CQ 

O 
u 



u 

<£l r-l 

*^ GQ 

^.3 
o 


By whom furnished. 


i 

id 

j3 -P 
to M 

o a 
o 


53 s 

-P o3 
2 -p 
pjtO 

O 


d 

.2 

'-+3 
c3 

-p 
CO 

Ti 

a 
o 
Ph 

o 

a 
co 


d 

.2 

+3 

co 
o 

+3 

bfl 

.3 

< 


d 

.2 
v> 

c3 

-p 
CO 

u 
03 

Ph 
o 
t3 
>> 

w 


Gorman-Leonard Coal Company, bituminous, . 


946.88 


- 


- 


- 


- 


4.10 


Gorman-Leonard Coal Company, bituminous, . 


- 


4,471.33 


- 


- 


- 


4.00 


C. W. Claflin & Co., buckwheat anthracite, 


79.55 


- 


- 


- 


- 


3.16 


C. W. Claflin & Co., buckwheat anthracite, 


- 


596.84 


- 


- 


- 


2.90 


Gorman-Leonard Coal Company, buckwheat an- 
thracite. 
Locke Coal Company, bituminous, . . 


— 


36.12 


325.14 


- 


- 


2.84 
5.13 


Bader Coal Company, bituminous, 


- 


- 


488.78 


- 


- 


5.08 


Locke Coal Company, screenings, 


- 


- 


164.09 


- 


- 


2.50 


Bader Coal Company, bituminous, 


- 


- 


- 


189.42 


- 


4.46 


Bader Coal Company, bituminous, 


- 


- 


- 


268.42 


- 


4.21 


Gorman-Leonard Coal Company, bituminous, . 


- 


- 


- 


- 


182.90 


4.11 


Gorman-Leonard Coal Company, bituminous, . 


- 


- 


'- 


- 


47.06 


4.17 


Total gross tons, bituminous, 


946.88 


4,471.33 


813.92 


457.84 


229.96 


- 


Total gross tons, anthracite, .... 


79.55-' 


632. 96 2 


- 


- 


- 


- 


Total gross tons, anthracite screenings, . 


- 


- 


164.09 


- 


- 


- 


Average price per gross ton, bituminous, 


4.10 


4.00 


5.10 


4.31 


4.12 


- 


Average price per gross ton, anthracite, 


3.16 2 


2.90 s 




- 


- 


- 


Average price per gross ton, anthracite screenings, 


- 


- 


2.50 


- 


- 


- 



1 Includes cost of unloading coal from cars and all expenses incidental to storage of the coal. 

2 Buckwheat. 



60 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



Tests of the coal used during the year have given the following 
results : — 





Kind of Coal. 


Number 

of Samples 

tested. 


British 

Thermal 

Units. 


Percent- 
age of 
Volatile 
Matter. 


Percent- 
age 
of Ash. 


Percent- 
age of 
Moisture. 


Percent- 
age 
of Fixed 
Carbon. 


Beaver Run, 

New River, .... 

Georges Creek, 

Sterling, .... 

Cardiff, .... 

Unclassified, 


59 
10 
4 
3 
1 
2 


14,462 
14,788 
14,363 
14,640 
14,885 
14,036 


17.12 
- 17.40 
18.27 
20.78 
18.96 
26.13 


8.60 
6.36 
8.83 
7.70 
5.79 
9.76 


3.34 
2.59 
2.04 
2.27 
3.23 
2.07 


74.28 
76.24 
72.90 
71.52 
75.25 
64.11 



All bituminous coal giving less than 14,700 British thermal units or 
more than 8 per cent, of ash has been purchased subject to a reduc- 
tion in price. 

Chestnut Hill Pumping Stations. 

At these stations a daily average of 33,690,000 gallons of water 
was raised 122.34 feet for the supply of the southern high-service 
district, and a daily average of 36,240,000 gallons was raised 40.18 
feet for the supply of the low-service and the northern high-service 
districts. These figures show an increase of 1,391,000 gallons per 
day in the quantity pumped for the southern high-service and a 
decrease of 1,411,000 gallons per day in the quantity pumped for 
the low-service and northern high-service districts. Statistics rela- 
tive to the operation of the several engines at these stations are as 
follows: — 



Pumping Station No. 1. 



Engines 

Nos. 
1 and 2. 



Engine 
No. 3. 



Engine 
No. 4. 



Daily pumping capacity (gallons), 
Total quantity pumped (million gallons), 
Daily average quantity pumped (gallons), 
Coal used in pumping (pounds), . 
Gallons pumped per pound of coal, 
Average lift (feet), ..... 

Cost of pumping: — 
Labor, . . . . 

Fuel, 

Repairs, . 

Oil, waste and packing, 

Small supplies, 



Totals, 



Cost per million gallons pumped, 

Cost per million gallons raised 1 foot high, 



16,000,0001 


20,000,000 


367.03 


14.92 


1,006,000 


41,000 


1,071,135 


15,455 


342.66 


965.38 


133.12 


117.43 


$2,585 13 


$88 91 


2,028 41 


29 40 


2,511 98 


118 70 


25 19 


87 


78 00 


4 75 


$7,228 71. 


$242 63 


$19.6951 


$16.2621 


.1479 


.1385 



30,000,000 

1,128 61 

3,092,000 

790,635 

1,427.47 

119.62 



$4,164 93 

1,474 26 

4,041 03 

40 58 

128 88 



),849 68 

$8.7273 
.0730 



Pumping 

Station 

No. 2. 



Engine 
No. 12. 



40,000,000 
10,786.30 

29,551,000 

7,198,460 

1,498.42 

122.26 



$12,579 65 

12,457 57 

1,199 86 

293 79 

163 28 



6,694 15 

$2.4748 
.0202 



Totals. 



106,000,000 

12,296.86 

33,690,000 

9,075,685 

1,354.92 

122.34 



$19,418 62 

15,989 64 

7,871 57 

360 43 

374 91 



$44,015 17 

$3.5794 
.0293 



8,000,000 each. 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



61 



Daily pumping capacity each engine (gallons), 
Total quantity pumped (gallons), . 
Daily average quantity pumped (gallons), 
Total coal used (pounds) , . 
Gallons pumped per pound of coal, . 
Average lift (feet), . .. ' . 



Cost of pumping : — 
Labor, .... 
Fuel, . . ' . 
Repairs, 

Oil, waste and packing, 
Small supplies, 



Total, . 

Cost per million gallons pumped, 

Cost per million gallons raised 1 foot high, 



Chestnut Hill 

Pumping Station 

No. 2. — Engines 

Nos. 5, 6 and 7. 

35,000,000 

13,227,750,000 

36,240,000 

4,579,640 

2,888.38 
40.18 



$18,328 57 

7,874 00 

3,212 01 

333 53 

237 89 

$29,986 00 

$2.2669 
.0564 



The cost of pumping at these stations was larger than during the 
previous year, due, in both cases, to the cost of repairs made upon 
the plant. 

At Station No. 1 the Green fuel economizer which has been in 
continuous use for 20 years has been replaced by one of larger 
size, built by the B. F. Sturtevant Company at an expense, includ- 
ing installation, of $2,437.85. Concrete piers and steel beams have 
been placed under the 90-inch Belpaire boiler and under the new 
economizer, at a cost of $1,833. This work was done for the pur- 
pose of preventing further settlement of these structures. In con- 
nection with the strengthening of the boiler and economizer foun- 
dation 1,830 square feet of the boiler-room floor was relaid with 
Barrington paving brick set on edge in Portland cement mortar on 
a concrete foundation 4 inches in thickness. The brick smoke flues 
which pass under the boiler-room floor were repaired and the floor 
drains repaired and relaid. The cost of work upon the floor, flues 
and drains was $2,044.66. A 24-inch Pelton water motor was 
installed at a cost of $546.25, for use in operating the machinery in 
the repair shop connected with the station. Power for operating 
the machinery used in making repairs is thus economically obtained 
as the water used in operating the motor is returned to the supply 
and not wasted. Repairs were made upon the copper portion of 
the station roof by W. J. Maguire at a cost of $210. 



62 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



At Station No. 2 a 20-inch pipe line, connecting the pipe leading 
from the Weston Aqueduct with the supply wells of the station and 
provided with a valve and Venturi meter for controlling and meas- 
uring the flow of water, has been installed for use in controlling the 
pressure upon the Boston low-service pipe system and also for 
measuring the water delivered from the Weston Reservoir into the 
Chestnut Hill Reservoir. This work, which cost $1,811.07, was 
completed and placed in service on July 1 and has since that time 
worked satisfactorily. 

The Howe scales which are used for weighing ashes from the 
boiler furnaces have been in the past located in a tunnel under the 
boilers, where the working parts of the scale have rapidly deterio- 
rated, due to the presence of moisture and sulphurous gases. The 
scales have been repaired and reset in a new location on the line of 
the track leading from the station to the ash dump, at a cost of 
$176.62. 

Sjiot Pond Pumping Station. 

The record shows an increase of 3.38 per cent, in the quantity of 
water pumped and 10.21 per cent, in the cost of pumping. 

The following are statistics relating to operations at this station, 
where water is pumped to the Fells and Bear Hill reservoirs for the 
supply of the northern high-service district: 



Total quantity pumped (gallons), 

Daily average quantity pumped (gallons), 

Total coal used (pounds), . 

Gallons pumped per pound of coal, 

Average lift (feet), 

Engine No. 8 operated (hours), 

Engine No. 9 operated (hours), 

Quantity pumped by Engine No. 8 (gallons), 

Quantity pumped by Engine No. 9 (gallons), 



Cost of pumping : — 
Labor, . . . -. 
Fuel, . 
Repairs, . . .' . 
Oil, waste and packing, 
Small supplies, 



Total for station, 



Cost per million gallons pumped, 

Cost per million gallons raised 1 foot high, 



2,688,880,000 

7,367,000 

2,412,976 

1,114.34 

131.84 

213 

3,134 

91,780,000 

2,597,100,000 

$9,351 67 

4,970 96 

603 42 

268 97 

199 09 

$15,394 11 

$5.7251 
.0434 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



63 



Arlington Pumping Station. 
At this station there was an increase of 5.82 per cent, in the 
quantity pumped and of 3.4 per cent, in the cost of operation. 
The statistics relative to the operation of the station for the year 
1914 are as follows: — 



Total quantity pumped (gallons), 

Daily average quantity pumped (gallons), 

Total coal used (pounds), . 

Gallons pumped per pound of coal, 

Average lift (feet), 

Engine No. 10 operated (hours), 

Engine No. 11 operated (hours), 

Quantity pumped by Engine No. 10 (gallons), 

Quantity pumped by Engine No. 11 (gallons), 



Cost of pumping : — 
Labor, . 

Fuel, ,..-.'. 
Repairs, . 

Oil, waste and packing, 
Small supplies, 



Total for station, ..... 

Cost per million gallons pumped, 

Cost per million gallons raised 1 foot high, 



262,000,000 

718,000 

1,049,753 

249.58 

281.83 

5,350 

734 

241,890,000 

20,110,000 



$5,505 64 

2,090 59 

341 86 

102 23 

119 26 

$8,159 58 

$31.1434 
.1105 



Hyde Park Pumping Station. 

There was a decrease of 37,220,000 gallons, equivalent to 12.71 
per cent., in the quantity pumped from this station, and a decrease 
of $870.59, equivalent to 10.72 per cent., in the cost of operation. 
It is expected that the cost of operating this station will be further 
reduced during the coming year by the completion and use of the 
steel reservoir on Bellevue Hill, with its increased storage capacity. 

The statistics relative to the operation of this station for the year 
1914 are as follows: — 



Total quantity pumped (gallons) , 
Daily average quantity pumped (gallons), 
Total coal used (pounds), . 
Gallons pumped per pound of coal, . 
Average lift (feet), 



255,670,000 

700,000 

508,426 

502.87 

120.6.3 



64 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



Engine No. 13 operated (hours), 

Engine No. 14 operated (hours), 

Quantity pumped by Engine No. 13 (gallons), 

Quantity pumped by Engine No. 14 (gallons), 



Cost of pumping : — 
Labor, . 
Fuel, .;•... 
Repairs, . . . • . 
Oil, waste and packing, 
Small supplies, 



Total for station, 



Cost per million gallons pumped, 

Cost per million gallons raised 1 foot high, 



1,604 

5,310 

56,460,000 

199,210,000 



$5,602 85 
952 67 
361 00 
164 92 
169 90 

$7,251 34 

$28.3621 
.2351 



During the year the old machinery which had been used at the 
West Roxbury Pumping Station and supplanted by the construction 
of the Hyde Park Station, consisting of 2 54-inch diameter boilers, 
1 60-inch diameter boiler, 2 1,000,000-gallon capacity Worthington 
compound direct-acting steam pumps, 1 1,750,000-gallon capacity 
Knowles pump and a Worthington type of condenser were sold to 
Louis E. Miller of East Boston for the sum of $604.08. 



Consumption of Water. 

The daily average quantity of water consumed in the 18 munic- 
ipalities supplied from the Metropolitan Works during the year 
1914, as measured by Venturi meters, was 107,036,100 gallons, 
equivalent to 94 gallons per capita in the district supplied. This 
quantity was 3,188,400 gallons per day more than during the pre- 
vious year, but exactly the same per inhabitant. Figures showing 
in detail the consumption in the several municipalities at different 
periods throughout the year indicate that the saving which has 
been effected during the past year by the introduction of meters 
has been offset by the increase in the use of water during the ex- 
treme cold and dry weather. 

The daily average consumption of water in each of the cities 
and towns supplied from the Metropolitan Works during the years 
1913 and 1914, as shown by meters, was as follows: — 



diagram showing 

Average Rate of Consumption of Water 

in the Metropolitan District in 1914 

DURING THE ENTIRE DAY 

AND 

BETWEEN THE HOURS OF I AND 4 AT NIGHT 



uu 



H 
Z 
< 



< 

00 



^ Z x: t CL 

H -J ,_ g 5 O O o 

Z>>uJHHH-5^¥ 



q; UJ tt! \D 



ISO 



140 



130 



^120 
O 



Q. 



o a: u 

OX:ixJo2,uJ>^uJ^^: 
co o co oo C? a: lu ^ _i < uo 



co al 

O O 

a: u_ 

Ld LJ 



2 

< 

U 

z 
o 
H 



z 

UJ 

o 

_J 
< 



z 
o 

H 



^ Z 2 co 2 2 




Dec. 31. 1913 
Dec. 31, 1914 



59.1 



57.7 



^ 'rAveraqe Rate per Capita for Entire District 



41.4 



47.4 



Percentage of Services Metered 1913-914 



98.4 



96.6 



61.3 



65.2 



85.0 



90.4 



500 



64.2 



39.7 



45.2 



100.0 



79.3 



85.1 



100.0 



100.0 



1000 



866 



93.6 



99.3 



99.0 



150 



140 



130 



120 >. 

(0 

110 



Daily Average Rate of Consumption 1914 V///A 

» Night between I A.M. and 4 A.M. 1914. 
Daily Average Rate of Consumption in 1913 shown in Red. 



Average Rate of Consumption 
in 

Metropolitan Water District 
— and — 
RAINFALL and AVERAGE TEMPERATURE of AIR at CHESTNUT HILL RESERVOIR 

, FOR 

EACH WEEK DURING 1914 
CONSUMPTION AHD NIGHT RATE 

Jan Feb. Mar Apr. May June July Aug. Sept. Oct. Nov. Dec. 

3 10 17 24 31 7 14 21 28 7 14 21 28 4 II 18 25 2 9 16 23 30 6 13 20 27 4 II 18 25 I 8 15 22 23 5 12 19 26 3 10 17 24 31 7 14 21 28 5 12 19 26 






























RAINFALL 








N 






INCHES 
































CO 
O 

o 


o 


O 


O 


?3 


o 


~ 


o 


o 




o 


en 


__ 


o 




o 


2 


— jd 


o 
o 


o 
o 


CD 
O 


O 

o 


O 


o 


<*> 


5 


s 

o 


o 


o 


o 
o 


o 


s 


o 


o 




o 
o 
o 


o 

o 
o 


o 

o 

o 


o 
o 


5 


o 


o 


o 


sis 


o 
o 
o 


o 


en 
o 


rJ 


IT) 



AVERAGE WEEKLY TEMPERATURE 

Jan Feb. Mar. Apr. May June July Aug. Sept. Oct. Nov. Dec. 

3 10 17 24 31 7 14 21 28 7 14 21 28 4 II 18 25 2 9 16 23 30 6 13 20 27 4 II 18 25 I 8 15 22 29 5 12 19 26 3 10 17 24 31 7 14 21 28 5 12 19 26 




Averages for 1913 shown in Red. 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



65 











Estimated 

Popula- 
tion, 1914. 


Daily Average Consumption. 




1913. 


1914. 


Increase 

in 
Gallons. 




Gallons. 


Gallons 

per 
Capita. 


Gallons. 


Gallons 

per 
Capita. 


Boston, . . . . . 


747,830 


79,390,600 


108 


81,877,800 


109 


2,487,200 


Somerville, 








84,530 


5,958,000 


72 


6,199,800 


73 


241,800 


Maiden, . 








48,950 


2,225,700 


46 


2,237,900 


46 


12,200 


Chelsea, . 








36,910 


2,879,800 


80 


2,904,400 


79 


24,600 


Everett, . 








38,500 


2,435,800 


65 


2,688,100 


70 


252,300 


Quincy, . 








36,410 


2,699,100 


76 


2,609,200 


72 


89,900 » 


Medford, . 








26,430 


1,233,700 


48 


1,258,900 


48 


25,200 


Melrose, . 








16,920 


1,136,600 


68 


932,500 


55 


204,100 » 


Revere, 








21,460 


1,385,100 


67 


1,551,000 


72 


165,900 


Watertown, 








14,430 


868,500 


62 


984,800 


68 


116,300 


Arlington, 








12,970 


786,300 


63 


860,500 


66 


74,200 


Milton, 








8,630 


332,300 


39 


346,700 


40 


14,400 


Winthrop, 








11,820 


689,700 


60 


722,800 


61 


33,100 


Stoneham , 








8,070 


414,400 


53 


378,800 


47 


35,600 * 


Belmont, . 








6,560 


463,600 


73 


497,500 


76 


33,900 


Lexington, 








5,550 


359,300 


67 


373,800 


67 


14,500 


Nahant, . 








1,440 


169,100 


123 


171,600 


119 


2,500 


Swampscott, 








6,770 


420,100 


63 


440,000 


65 


19,900 


District, 


1,134,180 


103,847,700 


94 


107,036,100 


94 


3,188,400 



1 Decrease. 



The consumption in the several districts was as follows: 





Gallons 

per Day, 

1914. 


Increase 
(Gallons 
per Day). 


Percent- 
age of 
Increase. 


Southern low-service district, embracing the low-service district of 
Boston, with the exception of Charlestown and East Boston, 

Northern low-service district, embracing the low-service districts 
of Somerville, Chelsea, Maiden, Medford, Everett, Arlington, 
Charlestown and East Boston, ....... 

Southern high-service district, embracing Quincy and Watertown, 
the high-service districts of Boston, and portions of Belmont 
and Milton, . 

Northern high-service district, embracing Melrose, Revere, Win- 
throp, Swampscott, Nahant and Stoneham, and the high-service 
districts of Somerville, Chelsea, Maiden, Medford, Everett and 
East Boston, .......... 

Southern extra high-service district, embracing the higher portions 
of Hyde Park, Milton and West Roxbury, 

Northern extra high-service district, embracing Lexington and the 
higher portions of Arlington and Belmont, 


45,353,100 
20,492,500 
32,185,200 

7,536,200 
745,400 
723,700 


267,900 

425,300 

2,306,200 

174,700 
31,200 ! 
45,500 


0.59 
2.12 

7.72 

2.37 

4.02» 

6.71 


Totals 


107,036,100 


3,188,400 


3.07 



1 Decrease. 



66 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

Fifteen of the eighteen municipalities show an increase in the 
total, use of water, but in only ten was there an increase in the 
quantity used per capita. 

The diagram facing this page shows graphically what has been 
accomplished in the Metropolitan District during the past seven 
years in reducing the waste of water, and at the same time indicates 
that while much has been accomplished the work is still unfinished. 

The conditions governing the use of water in the Metropolitan 
District are such that it seems probable that the total daily use of 
water in the District, which is now as low as it was thirteen years 
ago, notwithstanding an increase of about 300,000 in the number of 
people supplied, will not be further reduced; but the completion of 
the application of meters to all services, together with measures 
which should be taken to reduce the leakage from the street mains 
and services, will result in a reduction of the per capita consump- 
tion for several years. 

Metering of Service Pipes. 

The placing of meters on all new services and on 5 per cent, of 
those unmetered on December 31, 1907, in conformity with chapter 
52 of the Acts of the year 1907, has been continued during the 
year, and the following table shows the results accomplished in the 
several municipalities: — 




Aqq J3d eq-ideQ jad suo||bq 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



67 



'jg laquiaoaQ paia^aui 
saotAiag jo '^U83 .raj 



■£161 '18 
laquiaoaQ asQ in sja^aj^ 



•*I6I 'IS -raq 
-tuaaaQ 9sq ux saoiAjag 



paddmba saoiAjag Aiajvj 



t'H6I 
'pajprjsui saaiAiag Ava^j 



O0ffl40-1*OMHNHOONOONOOM 
OOJOOSONTtlcOOlMKItOTjHoomTtiN-^ 
«5'^tDNtOO'*H(OlOlONN'*COO!MN 

Dodt^TjTci'oo io *# oTc-fcNTr-Toq r-Ti-7 r-T 



(NIM^^OOONiJlHWOOHHOMlOOO 
OlOtCOOKO^OlrHlOlONOOlOPJi-lCON 



lOr-IQOOOUSNOOCDO^DOfflNffllNOOtDOO 
COC00505000J!DOJNlOMQON-*Ol001'(5 
CM CM •>* CO INHrt i—i 



NOOOOlOMNlOMONtOi-IOOlNOlOOO 
OSCOlMfflOOOJlOCOOOlONOOOO'^OiON'O 
■>* CM rH CO CO r- I CM r-l t-1 i— I 



S> 
K 
H 
X 

Q 

o 

o 

H 






OOONCOlONN | t- | Oi | | Oi | -H-l rJH I 



i-l CO r-l 



NOO I (MU50® | <* | rt | | N | ION | 
CM 00 CO rH Oi lO CO lO OJrH 

O ■* r-l (M O rH CM CM 



NOMN10O00K3O | N | (O «5 | tOOOM 

00 I-- OS 00 OO t— r— OI «5 OOiHrH 

■* »C OINtDH H r-l rH 
CO~ r-T rH~ 



iH rH 00 O N C3 «5 N O I CO I COCO I CO CO 00 
00 O t^t^CMlO H CO O OO lONN 
■* »0 t^ CM Ttl lO rH N rH 



co >— i cm co ic co i~^ 10 -# I co I ioic I o o cm 

OOCOlOlOCOOlCOOO »o I>- CM l>.-H-<*l 
HO CO t-» CM OJHrt OS CM rH 



-r+ICMCOOOOOOOt^CMlO I 00 | COCO I no* 

00C0T«O5COlO'OCO00 O »— I rH rHCOCO 

t- rHCOCO00"<cM rH NH rH CM 



•max q^S saoiAjag 
pjO no ^as aq o; paimb 
-aa sja^aj\[ jo aaqiun^j 



? 
o 
H 

« 
o 

H 

»H 

o 



©H-fONCOfflOO | >o I OlO I CM CO >— I 
t—>— ir-l-rtiiocOlr^-t— ICO iO OCO COi- 1 CM 






2S<i)o 



p * o I, i ft 

b(> £ J7 

fl rH S-H 



s g'S.s g as g s a ass § as <s a 



PQW 



T3-H 

■3.3 



a -s 



p 


ft 


fl 


a 


0) 


o 
o 






-t-> 


>. 


-ti 


~ 


a 


a 


Bl 


a> 




fl 



g £ 



I s 



68 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



The requirements of the law relative to the metering of services 
have been complied with in all municipalities with the exception 
of Quincy, where more than the required number were set on old serv- 
ices but where there is still a deficiency in the number required on new 
services installed in previous years. In twelve of the municipalities 
water is now supplied through meters to substantially all of the takers. 

In Boston the records indicate that approximately one-half of 
the services are still unmetered, but it is probable that the total 
number of services recorded is excessive and that the number actu- 
ally in use is less than the number stated. 

During the year there was a net increase of 10,579 in the number of 
meters used in the several municipalities, and at the end of the year 
62.57 per cent, of the 171,884 services were provided with meters. 

Water Supplied Outside the Metropolitan District. 
During the year 1914, 517,284,200 gallons of water were supplied 
by the Metropolitan Works for use outside the Metropolitan Dis- 
trict, as follows : — 



Places supplied. 


Total 
Quantity 
(Gallons). 


Average 

Daily 
Quantity 
(Gallons). 


Leng£h of 
Time during 

which Water 

was 

supplied 

(Days). 


Amounts 

charged 

for Water 

supplied. 


Westborough State Hospital, .... 
Town of Framingham : — 

From Framingham Reservoir No. 3, . 

From Filter-gallery at Farm Pond, 
United States Government: — 

Peddock's Island, 

Town of Saugus, 

Town of Wakefield, 


66,749,000 

41,400,000 
252,900,000 

39,800,000 

5,002,200 

111,433,000 


183,000 

113,427 
692,877 

109,000 

13,700 

305,300 


356 

282 
365 

365 

365 

187 


$2,002 47 

} 1,478 61 

2,537 21 
250 00 

7,800 31 



Quality of Water. 

About 86 per cent, of the water used in the Metropolitan District 
during the year was drawn from the Wachusett Reservoir, and the 
remainder from the Sudbury Reservoir and Framingham Reservoir 
No. 3, through which the supply from the Wachusett Reservoir was 
also drawn. The water delivered to the water takers has been of sub- 
stantially the same quality as that furnished during the past few years. 

The average results of the examinations of water drawn from a 
tap in Boston for alternate years since 1898 are given in the following 
table, and tables giving further details of the chemical and biological 
examinations of the water will be found in Appendix No. 2. 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



69 





1898. 


1900. 


1902. 


1904. 


1906. 


1908. 


1910. 


1912. 


1914. 


State Board of Health 




















Examinations. 




















Color (platinum standard), 


0.40 


0.29 


0.3Q 


0.23 


0.24 


0.19 


0.14 


0.17, 


0.14 


Total residue, 




4.19 


3.80 


3.93 


3.93 


3.86 


3.50 


3.05 


3.86 


4.12 


Loss on ignition, 




1.60 


1.20 


1.56 


1.59 


1.39 


1.35 


1.24 


1.23 


1.19 


Free ammonia, 




0.0008 


0.0012 


0.0016 


0.0023 


0.0018 


0.0011 


0.0013 


0.0018 


0.0014 


Albuminoid |& ed> \ 




0.0152 


0.0157 


0.0139 


0.0139 


0.0159 


0.0115 


0.0118 


0.0154 


0.0138 




0.0136 


0.0138 


0.0119 


0.0121 


0.0134 


0.0092 


0.0102 


0.0119 


0.0116 


ammonia, lsuspendedr 




0.0016 


0.0019 


0.0020 


0.0018 


0.0025 


0.0024 


0.0016 


0.0034 


0.0022 


Chlorine, .... 




0.29 


0.25 


0.29 


0.34 


0.34 


0.33 


0.28 


0.36 


0.39 


Nitrogen as, nitrates, 




0.0097 


0.0076 


0.0092 


0.0110 


0.0054 


0.0092 


0.0030 


0.0062 


0.0076 


Nitrogen as nitrites, 




0.0001 


0.0001 


0.0001 


0.0001 


0.0001 


0.0001 


0.0000 


0.0000 


0.0000 


Oxygen consumed, . 




0.44 


0.38 


0.40 


0.37 


0.36 


0.26 


0.22 


0.29 


0.25 


Hardness, 




1.4 


1.3 


1.3 


1.5 


1.3 


1.2 


1.1 


1.7 


1.4 


Metropolitan Water and Sew- 




















erage Board Examinations. 




















Color (platinum standard), 


0.40 


0.34 


0.33 


0.32 


0.25 


0.22 


0.18 


0.17 


0.16 


Turbidity, 




- 


- 


2.3 


2.4 


2.2 


2.4 


2.1 


2.2 


2.0 


Total organisms, 




230 


468 


367 


303 


550 


695 


421 


967 


549 


Amorphous matter, 




131 


97 


34 


36 


42 


64 


72 


141 


88 


Bacteria, .... 




96 


181 


164 


176 


154 


148 


213 


259 


220 



Note. — Chemical analyses are in parts per 100,000, organisms and amorphous matter in standard 
units per cubic centimeter, and bacteria in number per cubic centimeter. The standard unit has an 
area of 400 square microns, and by its use the number of Diatomacese are decreased, and the number of 
Chlorophycese and Cyanophycese are very much increased, as compared with the number of organisms. 

In connection with this branch of the w r ork 2,050 microscopical 
and 1,674 bacterial examinations of the water from various points 
on the works have been made in the laboratory of the Board, and 
the results of 415 chemical examinations have been received from 
the State Department of Health. 

Objectionable microscopic organisms have been present in several 
of the reservoirs, but not in sufficient numbers to cause objection- 
able tastes and odors in reservoirs from which the supply was drawn. 
Lake Cochituate has contained a large growth of Aphanizomenon, 
wmich has given the water of that source a disagreeable taste and 
odor during the greater part of the year. 



Sanitary Inspection. 

The sanitary inspection of the several watersheds has been main- 
tained, and violators of the rules and regulations of the Board 
have been prosecuted. Nine persons were prosecuted and fined for 
violations of the regulations relative to fishing and bathing, and 
others have had their licenses revoked and have been cautioned 
against further violations of the rules. 

The results of the inspection of the watersheds is given in the 
following tables : — 



70 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 






-s5 



CO 

CO 
C3 



-t-o 

o 

co 

© 
CD 

CO 






8 

OQ 







•pasn si jo^jW 


CM CM 


OO 


I— 1 


»o 


OS 


■<* 


^ 


CM 


o 


CO 


t~- 


« 




►J 

Cm 

en 

3 


on qoiqAi uo sasiuiaij 


























1 


•o^a 'stua^ 


r- OO 


cs 


CM 


o 


tH 


CM 


CO 


O 


^ 


t^ 


■* 


CO 


o 


02 


-SIQ 'Bip^ S^AIJJ 


lO CO 




CO 


7—1 


'Ch 


OO 


O0 


CO 


o 

CM 


CO 

T— 1 


CO 


CO 


OS 


< 


A"q paijddns sasixnajj; 


























- 1 


•Ajddng isye^ otj 


1>- 1 


1 


1 


CO 
GO 




lO 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


i 


CM 


-qn^ SuiA'eq sasiuiaij 


























CM 


5 9 




1 1 


-CH 


1 


!>. 


lO 


lO 


CM 


^ 


iO 


co 


rH 


1 


CO 


!? w 


•^JO^O'BJST^BSUJ^ 










CM 
















lO 


0>H 

s ° 
































co o 


CO 


CO 


■* 


CM 


co 


"O 


,_, 


CO 


o 


t^ 


■* 


r^ 




•i^JO^O'BJSI^'Bg 


to ^t< 


OO 


CO 


C5 


O 
CM 


00 


O0 


CO 


o 

CM 




CO 


CO 


CO 


OH 














- 


















•spaq-ia^ij 


1 1H 


1 


1 


1 


i— 1 


1 


1 


1 


T-l 


rH 


o 

OS 


1 


OS 




o% pauxeo aSmireaQ 






























rH 1 


rt 


l— < 


^ 


CM 


_H 


"* 


1 


CO 


i— < 


id 


1 


o 




•8SBUIBJQ OjsJ 






























Tj< CO 


o 


CM 


o 


CO 


I>- 


t>. 


CM 


,_, 


Tj< 


*# 


^ 


,_, 


































•^ubot?^ sasiuiaij 




























•sa^s'BjVY 


1 1 


1 


1 


« 


CO 


»H 


1 


t-t 


1 


1 


I 


1 


CO 




§UTJTl^0'BjnU'BJ\[ 
































1 1 


1— ( 


1 


1 


CM 


^, 


1— t 


1 


CM 


cq 


i— i 


1 


o 


E-i 
O 

H 

Oh 

to 


H 

•< S 

ffl <! 

« 


•AJO^O'BJSI^'BSUJ^ 






























CO CM 


CM 


CO 


o 


o 


,_, 


C5 


»o 


OS 


CO 


CO 


CO 


y _ l 


05 

OS 


•A'jO'P'ejSI^'Bg 


CM CM 


»o 


CM 


00 


>o 


-*l 


■* 


CM 


OS 


t^ 


>o 


1—1 


CM 

CO 
































-c 

o 


































1 1 


•* 


1 


o 


«>. 


CM 


1 


1 


CM 


CM 


CM 


1 


lO 


&H 

O 


•A'lo^O'BjsrvesuQ 




























Jz; 
































o 




































■* OO 


OO 


ira 


Iffl 


lO 


CM 


t^ 


l-H 


00 


CM 


CO 


OS 


t>- 


o 

H 


•^JO^O'BJSr^'Bg 


CM rt 


CO 




CO 


CM 


■>* 


CO 


CM 


OS 


1^ 


t^ 




CO 
US 


fc 


H 






























OS 


































1 1 


1 


I 


1 


«5 


*— f 


I— 1 


1 


CM 


1 


1—1 


1 


o 


•©SBurejQ >jntg 'joaaiQ 




























o 






























•8SB 


1 1 


*H 


I 


1 


CO 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


^CH 




-urejQ Aauj q.08jipu]; 




























•a3i3 


1 1 


1 


1 


1 


CM 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


CM 




-UIT3JQ A'AIJJ ^08JTQ 




























•>I6I 


t- CM 


o. 


CM 




o 


■* 


-H 


T— ( 


>* 


1 


CO 


CO 


co 




Suunp Snp sioodssaQ 




























•H6I 


CM lO 


CO 


■* 


CO 


CO 


,_, 


rf 


"* 


OS 


Tt< 


o 


o 


O 




CO r-t 


CM 




o 


"•cH 


CO 


CO 




J>. 


lO 


!>• 


CM 


CO 




aaojaq Snp spodssaQ 








t— I 


l-H 
















t^ 




x-po^oads 


CO o 


t- 


CO 


T— 1 


t- 


1—1 


t^ 


CM 


i _ l 


co 


" 








CO Ttl 


oo 


CO 


o 


CM 


C5 


0O 


CO 




■* 


t^ 


CO 


CM 


-ui f 


sastraajj jo jaquinj\j 








CM 


CM 








CM 


1—1 


i— 1 




kO 


















^ 
















O 










o 
o 




o 

O 

PQ 




o 

PQ 




• 


• 






h- 1 


•* 4 




^4 


rM 


W 




CP 
CQ 
3 




+3 
0> 


CQ 
> 












H 

I— I 

Q 


° s 

o 2 
PQ PQ 

a T3 

0) 3 

fa S 


o 

O 
F-< 

PQ 
co 
0) 

-f» 
c3 

a 


o 
o 


o 

o 
u 

PQ 

a 

cS 

o 


^3 

a 

3 
in 

<3 


3 

cS 

a 
o 

o 

CQ 

3 


3 
O 


o 
o 
u 

PQ 

■+3 

3 

o 

(1 

H 


3 
o 

CQ 

cs3 


P3 

u 
o 

+3 

Vs 

02 


a 

3 
o 

C3 

r3 
CQ 

3 
cS 


9 

-3 
o 
3 
CB 

fa 


02 
■+3 

o 



a 

O 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



71 



T-H 
1—1 



73 
50 



s 

-to 

"?o 
© 
73 



rO 



o 

HO 

a, 

CO 



>t3 



53 

c<2 



0Q 



5 ps 

5° 

o s 

OS 



5 



•A".io;oi3jsi^esuf} 



•^JO^O'BJSI^'Bg 



I H*K5 HMUJffiMN 



Ci OS CO lO WCIOOO'* 
OXC5C5 NNONHO 
CO 05 C2 CO CM CO i— l r- 1 00 



CO-* 00 CO 
CICOOO 
HOHO 



•spaq-ja^TjI 



•aSBurejQ oj\j 



•^ubo^a sasiuiai^ 



•sa^sB^ 



Suun^o'Bjnu'Bj\[ 



I I T*W I I I I I I 



NNNtO CO r^ "# CI "# -* 



CO OS C^l O 



OffllOH CONNOOOM 



•^JOq.O'BJSTq.'BSUQ 



•A"jO^013JSl^13g 



I I NINIMrt 



OOONlO NtDrtlOTjlO 
rt^liHIM O CO !>■ O CO C\l 



Uh 




fc 


a 


to 





H 


^ 


o 


fi 


w 




M 


•«! 




M 


H 


Q 


£ 





•^jo^oejsi^esufi 



•AjO^O'BJST^'Bg 



I thN'* hmhoonio 



•ag'Bni'BJQ ^utg ^oaatQ 



•aSra 

-urejQ a"atjj; ^oajipuj 



•aSi3 
-urejQ a'aiij; ^09jiq 



•H6I 
Suunp Snp sjoodssaQ 



■mi 

ajopq Snp sioodssa^ 



•SUOpOeuUOQ J8AY8g 



I I In I I c-q | | | 



I I HH I I I C<I I CM 



I I I I I I I I I I 



Ir-HTJHCO Tjl CM T-l »-< ,— I i-l 



O CO CO lO 



IONHO O CO •* «3 C5 CM 

i# CO lO HOCONS5 

CM CXI CM .—l CM r-l 



OHtDN 
CO i— I t^rf 
i-H CM (M 



I I I I I OS 



I i-H CM CO 
>C O 
J>^ CM 



, panels 
-hi sasiuiajj jo jaquinjsj 



U 

i— i 

H 

CO 



OOCJO C2 lO •*»< lO CO i— I 
05 00 (M N rt 00 rt rt 
CO CM O CO CM ■<*< tH i— I OO 



■* Ttl 00 rt 
OS CO CD t~~ 

»-t O i— l >o 



. a 

c3 



o 



a> 



•3 2 

■fc« • 
V bD - 

r * CI . 

OS C s 



1 -S^^"a a '^'oT3 

S3 •*> Ji 3 "3 a* c3 ° 

sllll Mil 



*g 

SCO 

-*-» c3 

r* o 



-* c3 S > 

c3 be 3 03 
(3 Oi O o 
CQP-tOW 



72 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



There was a reduction of 57 in the total number of premises on 
the Wachusett watershed, due to the diversion of 9.35 square miles 
of the drainage area by the city of Worcester, and there has been a 
reduction in the number of unsatisfactory cases on each of the water- 
sheds, due to improvements made in the methods of disposing of the 
household and manufacturing wastes. 

Legal measures for the improvement of sanitary conditions in 
the valley of Gates Brook, near the West Boy 1st on- Worcester line, 
have been instituted through the office of the Attorney-General, 
but no definite results have been accomplished as yet. 

Surveys have been made and plans prepared for the purpose of 
improving the sanitary conditions on the Wachusett watershed. 

On the Sudbury and Cochituate watersheds the number of prem- 
ises where the drainage is removed by sewers outside the watershed 
has been increased by 173, and the number still existing on streets 
where sewers have been built also shows an increase, due to the 
fact that houses in the Lokerville district of Framingham, where 
sewers have been recently constructed, have not yet been connected 
with the sewers. The number of premises, both connected and un- 
connected, in the several places was, on December 31, 1914, as 
follows : — 





Premises connected 
with Sewers. 


Premises not connected 
with Sewers. 




1913. 


1914. 


1913. 


1914. , 


Marlborough, 

Westborough, ...... 

Framingham, ...... 

Natick, . - . 

Sherborn, ....... 


1,589 
529 

1,363 
734 

7 


1,603 
539 

1,491 

751 

11 


45 
12 
17 

25 


41 

7 
58 
21 


Totals, ....... 


4,222 


4,395 


99 127 



There were two cases of typhoid fever reported as occurring on 
the Wachusett watershed, five cases on the Sudbury watershed and 
two cases on the Cochituate watershed. In all cases necessary 
measures were taken to prevent contamination of the water supply. 



Swamp Ditches and Brooks. 

The ditches, 36.36 miles in length, which are maintained by the 
Board on the several watersheds for the purpose of improving the 
quality of the water, have received the usual care and attention. 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 73 

They have been cleaned and the weeds and brush alongside the 
ditches cut and burned for a width of about 20 feet. Repairs have 
been made to the Deerfoot and other ditches on the Sudbury 
watershed which have included 1,403 linear feet of new bottom 
boards, 1,899 feet of side rails and 2,635 square feet of repaying. 
The ditches in Big Crane Swamp were reshaped and repaved for a 
distance of 4,679 feet, and 2,925 feet of Clinton electrically welded 
wire fencing, which was erected in 1899 along the property line of 
the Board to keep cattle from the drainage ditches, has been re- 
placed with No. 65 Wheelock wire fencing, at a cost of $598.66. 

Protection of the Supply by Filtration. 

The several filter-beds which are maintained by the Board for the 
purpose of protecting the water collected in the streams before its 
admission into the storage reservoirs have been maintained as 
usual. The Marlborough Brook filter-beds, with an area of 14 
acres, received the water from an area of 2 square miles of the thickly 
settled portion of the city of Marlborough, and filtered all, with 
the exception of 39,500,000 gallons, which flowed directly into the 
Sudbury Reservoir between March 1 and 4, at a time when the beds 
did not have sufficient capacity, owing to their frozen condition, to 
filter the entire flow of the brook. Early in the spring the bed of 
the brook which enters these beds was cleaned, and in June and 
July the receiving basin and the filter-beds were cleaned. From 
the receiving basin 1,540 cubic yards of material were removed and 
disposed of as filling on the adjoining land of O. P. Walker, at a 
cost of 41 cents per cubic yard. 

The filter-beds on Farm Street received diluted sewage from the 
Marlborough main sewer on one day in March, five days in April 
and one day in May, and a flow of ground water from the sewer at 
times during March, April, May and July. 

At the Pegan Brook pumping station, where the surface drainage 
from an area of about 1 square mile in the thickly settled portion 
of the town of Natick is pumped upon filter-beds before entering 
Lake Cochituate, the pumps were operated during portions of 256 
days, and 309,005,000 gallons, equivalent to a daily average of 
846,589 gallons, were pumped to the filter-beds. Overflow from 
Pegan Brook to Lake Cochituate took place at different times be- 
tween March 1 and 5, and from the intercepting ditch to the lake 



74 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

on January 24, 25 and 31, also from March 1 to 7. At these times 
the yield of the brook watershed was larger than could be cared 
for by the filter-beds in their frozen condition. The amounts unfil- 
tered which ran directly to the lake were about 14,000,000 gallons 
from Pegan Brook and 37,000,000 gallons from the intercepting 
ditch. The cost of operating the pumping station, and cleaning 
and maintaining the filter-beds and settling reservoir was $4,945.36, 
equivalent to a cost of $16 per million gallons treated, which is 
higher than usual as it includes the cost of removing the sediment 
which had collected in Pegan Brook, the settling reservoir and the 
ditches leading thereto during the past several years. 

The four filter-beds, with a combined area of 2 acres, on which 
was received the flow from 525 acres in the village of Sterling, 
treated the entire flow from the brook. , 

The filter-beds on which the sewage from the Worcester County 
Training School is received and treated have been cared for and have 
operated satisfactorily throughout the year. 

The Gates Terrace filter-beds at Sterling Junction were operated 
from April 18 to November 7. 

Forestry. 

During the year 99,300 white pine seedlings, nearly all of which 
were 3 years old, were planted in the vicinity of the Sudbury Reser- 
voir and 28,000 seedlings and about 3,600 small pines at other 
reservoirs and along the Sudbury, Cochituate and Weston aque- 
ducts. Near the Wachusett Dam and along the open channel por- 
tion of the Wachusett Aqueduct 2,200 4-year-old white pine seed- 
lings were set out, but other planting in the Wachusett Depart- 
ment was deferred until another season on account of the dry 
weather. 

During the spring there were received from the State Forester 
353,400 white pine seedlings which were placed in transplant beds 
in nurseries near the Sudbury and Wachusett reservoirs. These have 
been cultivated and the several nurseries contained trees as follows 
at the end of the year: — 

Sudbury Department : — 

Sudbury nursery, 135,000 2-year-old white pine seedlings. 
Sudbury nursery, 22,500 3-year-old white pine seedlings. 



No. 57.1 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



75 



Wachusett Department : — 

Oakdale nursery, 149,000 4-year-old white pine seedlings. 
Oakdale nursery, 62,700 3-year-old white pine seedlings. 
Oakdale nursery, 28,300 4-year-old spruce seedlings. 
Oakdale nursery, 200 2-year-old red pine seedlings. 
Oakdale nursery, 200 3-year-old sequoia seedlings. 
North Dike nursery, 122,200 2-year-old white pine seedlings. 

Considerable work has been done in preparing land for the planting 
of pine trees by removing brush and undesirable trees. Thirty acres 
of land at Boylston, formerly owned by C. L. Lord, was thus prepared. 

The work of protecting the chestnut trees from destruction by 
the chestnut bark disease has been carried on in the Wachusett 
Department by cutting out 5,660 diseased trees on 1,655 acres of 
woodland, by clearing all trees from 24 acres where the disease was 
very prevalent, and by cutting all chestnut trees on an area of 8 
acres covered with 20-year-old oak, maple and chestnut. All of this 
work cost $3,760, and there was received $2,040 from the sale of 
telephone poles, railway ties, chair logs and cord wood. 

The following sums have been expended on the several parts of the 
works in protecting the trees from the ravages of destructive insects: — 

Spot Pond, 

Mystic Lake, Station and Reservoir, . 

Chestnut Hill Reservoir, 

Weston Reservoir and lower portion of Weston Aqueduct, 
Sudbury, Cochituate and Weston aqueducts, 

Sudbury Reservoir, 

Framingham Reservoirs Nos. 1, 2 and 3, Hopkinton Reservoir and 
Cedar Swamp, . . . . . 

Lake Cochituate, 

Wachusett Reservoir : — 

Painting gypsy moth eggs, . . 

Spraying gypsy moths, 

Pine tree weevil (1,313 acres), 

Tent caterpillars, 

$7,787 04 



$874 40 


39 


83 


492 94 


1,114 


23 


506 


22 


1,120 73 


273 


99 


637 


17 


1,199 


09 


651 


00 


437 


15 


440 


29 



In doing this work about 96,600 clusters of the eggs of the gypsy 
moth were painted with creosote, and 18,000 pounds of arsenate of 
lead were used in spraying the foliage of the trees to destroy the 
caterpillars. 



76 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



Distributing Reservoirs. 

The water collected and stored in the reservoirs on the several 
watersheds has been conveyed to and delivered from the following 
reservoirs and standpipes located in or near the Metropolitan Dis- 
trict : — 





Elevation at 


Capacity in 




High Water. 


Gallons. 


Spot Pond, Stoneham and Medford, . 


163.00 


1,791,700,000 


Chestnut Hill Reservoir, Brighton district of Boston, 








134.00 


300,000,000 


Weston Reservoir, Weston, . . . 








200.00 


200,000,000 


Fells Reservoir, Stoneham, .... 










271.00 


41,400,000 


Mystic Reservoir, Medford, .... 










157.00 


26,200,000 


Fisher Hill Reservoir, Brookline, . 










251.00 


15,500,000 


Waban Hill Reservoir, Newton, 










264.50 


13,500,000 


Forbes Hill Reservoir, Quincy, 










192.00 


5,100,000 


Bear Hill Reservoir, Stoneham, 










300.00 


2,450,000 


Arlington Standpipe, Arlington, 










442.00 


550,000 


Forbes Hill Standpipe, Quincy, 


" 








251.00 


330,000 


Total 










- 


2,396,730,000 



Spot Pond, Fells and Bear Hill Reservoirs. 

Spot Pond is the principal distributing reservoir of the Metropolitan 
Water Works, and a force averaging 10 men has been employed in 
caring for the reservoir and its surrounding grounds, which form a 
portion of the Middlesex Fells park reservation, including the Fells 
and Bear Hill reservoirs, which are located near by. Spot Pond 
has been in constant use, and with its connected structures and 
grounds is now in good condition. The cost of patrolling the prop- 
erty of the Board in the vicinity of the Spot Pond, Fells and Bear 
Hill reservoirs, and in preventing the pollution of the water supply 
by the public, which frequents the reservoirs in large numbers during 
pleasant weather, was $1,263. 

Considerable trouble has been experienced and labor expended in 
keeping the pond free from ducks and gulls, as we are not allowed 
by the State law to kill the birds and our efforts are directed toward 
driving them away by the use of a motor boat and blank cartridges, 
which prove but partially successful. During one week in October 
2,840 gulls and 1,515 ducks were reported as present on the pond. 

Chestnut Hill Reservoir. 

This reservoir has received the water delivered by the Sudbury 
Aqueduct, and from its Bradlee basin has been drawn the water 
pumped for the southern high and low service districts. The gate- 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 77 

houses, walks and grounds have been kept in repair and are in 
good order, with the exception of the fence on the northerly line of 
Beacon Street, which should be renewed during the present year. 
The inspection and patrol work at this reservoir cost $613.62. 

Weston Reservoir. 
This reservoir was used continuously throughout the year for 
storing and delivering the supply received from the Weston Aqueduct. 
In addition to the ordinary care of the structures and grounds, some 
work has been done by the maintenance force in constructing foot 
paths. Three culverts were built over the surface drainage ditch 
which skirts the north and west sides of the reservoir. One thou- 
sand and eighty pines and cedars were planted on the grounds, and 
a story and a half structure, 18 feet x 26 feet, has been erected 
near Ash Street for use as a stable and storehouse. This build- 
ing has sides of cement stucco on metal lath, a floor and partitions 
of cement concrete, and a roof covered with Reynolds asphaltum 
shingles. The building, which was erected by the regular employees 
of the Board, cost $888.45. 

Fisher Hill and Waban Hill Reservoirs. 

These reservoirs, which receive and from which is distributed the 
water pumped at Chestnut Hill for the supply of the southern high- 
service district, have been kept in repair by the force which also 
cares for Chestnut Hill Reservoir. The resurfacing of the path 
around the Waban Hill Reservoir with crushed stone obtained from 
the supply pipe line tunnel has been partially completed. Consid- 
erable labor has been expended in trimming the trees and shrub- 
bery on the grounds at Fisher Hill Reservoir, which was acquired 
from the city of Boston by this Board in 1913. 

Miscellaneous Structures. 

The Forbes Hill Reservoir and water tower are in good condition, 
as well as the Mystic Reservoir and the standpipe in Arlington. 
Mystic Lake has not been used as a source of water supply for the 
District since 1898, but the dam, aqueduct and other structures 
are cared for by this Board. The apron below the outlet dam at 
Mystic Lake has been repaired during the past year at an expense 
of $429.97. 



78 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

Pipe Lines. 

The length of mains owned and operated by the Board has been 
increased 2.95 miles during the year, as a result of laying new 
mains for a length of 3.32 miles in Boston, Cambridge, Chelsea, 
Milton and Quincy, and of discontinuing old mains for a length of 
0.37 of a mile in Boston, Cambridge and Chelsea. The length con- 
trolled and operated by the Board on December 31, 1914, was 
119.05 miles, and the length of mains 4 inches in diameter and larger 
connected with the works but owned and operated by the several 
cities and towns supplied with water was 1,694.90 miles. 

Relaying 24-inch Main on Broadway, Chelsea. 

The 24-inch water pipe in Broadway, Chelsea, was relaid for a 
distance of 1,379.4 feet in 1913. The surface of the trench in which 
the pipe was laid has been repaved during the past year by C. W. 
Dolloff & Company. The cost of the work, including labor and 
materials furnished by the Commonwealth, was $1,789.28. This 
added to the cost of work done in 1913 makes the total cost of 
relaying 1,379.4 feet of 24-inch pipe $9,174.02. 

Cleaning 24-inch Pipe Line. 

A section of the easterly 24-inch pipe line at Chelsea Creek, in East 
Boston, was cleaned in September for a length of 612 feet by, the 
National Pipe Cleaning Company, in order to demonstrate the effi- 
ciency of its methods. 

Anderson Bridge. 

The laying of pipes on the new Anderson Bridge over the Charles 
River to replace the submerged pipes with flexible joints, which 
had been injured by electrolytic action since they were laid in 
1897, was begun in 1913 and completed May 25. The pipe line 
as relaid is divided on each side of the river by a 48-inch x 36-inch 
Y branch, and crosses over the bridge by two lines of pipe each 
about 420 feet long, laid in the sidewalk. By reason of the shallow 
depth of filling over the masonry arches the size of the pipes cross- 
ing the bridge was reduced from 36 inches to 30 inches for a dis- 
tance of 227 feet. The amount expended for this work in 1913 was 
$4,951.49, and in 1914, $6,392.78, making a total of $11,344.27. 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 79 

Connection with Lynn. 
A connection 12 inches in diameter has been made between the 
16-inch Metropolitan main and a 12-inch main of the city of Lynn, 
at the corner of Broad and Washington streets in Lynn, for the 
use of the city of Lynn or this Board in case of emergency. 

Pipe Bridge over Boston & Albany Railroad. 

The plate girder bridge, built by the Boston Bridge Works for 
the city of Boston in 1894, and used for supporting the 36-inch 
pipe over the Boston & Albany Railroad at Chestnut Hill Avenue, 
Brookline, was found to be seriously deteriorated by the action of 
gases and blast from the locomotives passing below. Damaged 
portions of the bridge were renewed and the girders strengthened by 
the Boston Bridge W 7 orks at a cost of $531.09. 

Breaks and Leaks. 

About 10.15 a.m. on October 3 a 36-inch pipe in one of the two 
lines into which the 48-inch pipe line is divided where it passes 
under the Mystic River at Wellington Bridge, Somerville, was 
broken by the accidental dropping on it of an 18-inch square steel- 
pointed spud connected with a dredging machine belonging to the 
Eastern Dredging Company. As a result the water flowed from the 
openings at an average rate of about 75,000,000 gallons per day 
while the gates for controlling the flow of water were being closed, 
and the pressure over the northern low service district was low- 
ered from 25 to 35 pounds below normal for about 45 minutes. 
This line was repaired by removing the broken pipe which neces- 
sitated blasting with dynamite, inserting two new lengths of 36-inch 
pipe with the aid of a diver, and making the joints with lead wool. 
The approximate cost of the work, which was done by and at the 
expense of the Eastern Dredging Company under the supervision of 
this department, was S800. 

Other leaks which have been repaired by and at the expense of 
the department have numbered 63, and have entailed an expense of 
$3,257.54. 

The most expensive leaks were the replacing of a cracked 36- 
inch curve at the Chestnut Hill high-service station, which cost 
$468.47; repairing two 36-inch joint leaks under the Maiden River, 
$413.31; repairing two leaks in lead joints under the Mystic River, 



80 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

$700, and repairing two 48-inch joint leaks under the tracks of the 
Boston & Albany Railroad at the Longwood Station, which cost 
$610.50. 

The sum of $959.02 was spent for labor and materials used in 
restoring the estates damaged by the break in the 48-inch main on 
Clinton Road, Brookline, which occurred December 4, 1913. This 
sum was expended in reloaming and reseeding the damaged prop- 
erties, cleaning and whitewashing the basements of the houses and 
relaying the entrance walks. 

For the purpose of avoiding breaks in the 48-inch pipe line which 
passes through Clinton Road, the earth covering over the pipe has 
been reduced by the removal of about 1,500 cubic yards of earth 
along a distance of 550 feet, where the pipe passes through a loca- 
tion owned by the Board. This work cost $1,466.23. 

Metering of Water to Municipalities. 

There are now 76 Venturi meters used in connection with the 
Metropolitan Water Works. Nine of these are located on the 
Wachusett and Sudbury supply works, and the remainder are used 
in the Distribution Department in metering the water supplied to 
the several municipalities. There are also connected with the works 
three Hersey disc meters, one Hersey torrent and five Hersey de- 
tector meters. These are used to measure flows which are too small 
to be conveniently measured with a Venturi meter. 

Recording Pressure Gages. 
Twenty-two gages have been maintained for the purpose of con- 
tinuously indicating and recording the pressure in the Metropolitan 
mains at different points on the works. The average results of 
these observations are given in Table 44 in Appendix No 1 . 2, and in- 
dicate that in general the pressure throughout the system has been 
well maintained and at some points increased as compared with 
the records of previous years. 

Electrolysis. 
Electric potential and current measurements to determine the 
probable extent of electrolytic action upon the water mains were 
made during the year in the portion of the district north of the 
Charles River. 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 81 

The results of the measurements show an improvement over the 
former conditions by a reduction of about 50 per cent, in the cur- 
rent returning over the water mains to the street railway power 
station in Chelsea and by a noticeable reduction in the current 
returning over the water mains to the street railway power station 
in Lynn. 

The improved condition in Chelsea is probably due in part to the 
use of insulating joints in relaying the 24-inch water main in Broad- 
way in 1913 and in part to a rearrangement and increase in capacity 
of the street railway return feeders, made by the railway com- 
pany during the same year. 

The improved condition in Lynn is probably due to the installa- 
tion of insulating joints in the 16-inch water main at Fox Hill 
Bridge in 1913 and to the improvement in the street railway 
return feeders which has also been made by the railway com- 
pany. 

The operation of a new substation located on Center Street in 
Maiden since 1912 has probably had some effect in reducing the 
electric current flowing on the water mains leading to Chelsea. 
The operation of this substation has, however, produced a positive 
area of small extent in the water mains in the vicinity. 

The practice of making insulating joints at intervals of about 500 
feet in all new pipe lines laid has been continued during the year, 
and considerable benefit is probably derived from the work. 

Clinton Sewage Disposal Works. 
The Clinton sewage disposal works were operated daily through- 
out the year. The daily average quantity of sewage pumped to the 
filter-beds was 1,022,000 gallons, which is about an average for the 
past three years. During the months of April and May, when large 
quantities of water were flowing in the Nashua River, the quantities 
of sewage pumped were excessive, due, largely, to the leaky condi- 
tion of the sewer paralleling the Nashua River through German- 
town, where the water from the river enters the sewer at times of 
high water. The daily average quantity of sewage pumped during 
each month of the year was as follows: — 



82 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



January, 

February, 

March, 

April, 

May, 

June, 

July, 

August, 

September, 

October, 

November, 

December, 



Gallons. 

920,000 

1,044,000 

1,307,000 

1,888,000 

1,660,000 

911,000 

798,000 

773,000 

742,000 

711,000 

723,000 

792,000 



Pumping Station. 

The following are statistics relating to the operation of the pump- 
ing station : — 

Daily average quantity of sewage pumped (gallons), . 
Daily average quantity of energy consumed (kilowatt hours), 
Daily average quantity of coal consumed in burning sludge and 

heating building (pounds), .... 
Gallons pumped per kilowatt hour, . 
Daily average lift of sewage (feet), . 
Daily average efficiency of pumping unit (per cent.), 
Number of days pumping, .... 

Cost of pumping : — 

Labor, . . 

Energy (at $5.30 per thousand kilowatt hours), 
Fuel (coal for burning sludge and heating), . 
Repairs and supplies, . . . . . 

Total for station, 

Cost per million gallons pumped, 

Cost per million gallons raised 1 foot high, 

The woodwork of the station, both outside and inside, has been 
painted and minor repairs made to windows, doors and roof so 
that the building is now in good repair. 



1,022,000 


321 


274 


3,174 


49.3 


55.3 


365 


$1,296 34 


621' 58 


232 04 


221 46 


$2,371 42 


$6.36 


.13 



Filter-beds. 
Sewage was applied to the filter-beds in practically the same 
manner as during the preceding 6J years. Each of the 25 1-acre 
beds has received about 71,000 gallons of sewage in 30 minutes at 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



83 



intervals of 1.7 days, equivalent to about 41,000 gallons per acre 
per day. During the winter season the surface of the beds was 
plowed in furrows about 3J feet apart. The settling basins, into 
which the sewage is pumped previous to being applied upon the 
filter-beds, were in continuous use throughout the year. Seven hun- 
dred and twenty-five cubic yards of sludge were collected from 
these basins, of which quantity 500 yards have been spread on six 
acres of grass land near the filter-beds and one acre at the pumping 
station, and the remainder stored near the filtration area. Con- 
crete carriers were constructed upon filter-beds Nos. 28 and 29. The 
following tabulation shows the results of the analyses of the sewage 
and effluent for the past year as compared with those for previous 
years: — 

[Parts per 100,000.] 







Average 
of Four 
Years, 
1907-10. 


1911. 


1912. 


1913. 


1914. 


Whole 




Janu- 
ary to 
June. 


July to 
Decem- 
ber. 


Year, 
1914. 


Albuminoid ammonia, sewage, 


1.1444 


1.0683 


1.6017 


1.2025 


1.1317 


1.6233 


1.3775 


Albuminoid ammonia, effluent, 




.0605 


.0639 


.0724 


.0369 


.1121 


.0396 


.0758 


Per cent, removed, . 




94 


94 


95 


97 


90 


98 


94 


Oxygen consumed, sewage, 






9.279 


9.3292 


11.812 


9.317 


9.3500 


12.3000 


10.825 


Oxygen consumed, effluent, 






.6943 


.8713 


.5170 


.5037 


.7138 


.4434 


.5786 


Per cent, removed, . 






92 


91 


95.5 


95 


92 


96 


94.5 


Free ammonia, sewage, . 






4.5374 


5.7417 


4.2129 


4.3083 


3.8833 


4.4483 


4.1658 


Free ammonia, effluent, . 






.5591 


.7369 


.6709 


.1792 


.5620 


.1070 


.3345 


Per cent, removed, . 






88 


87 


84 


96 


86 


98 


92 


Nitrogen as nitrates, effluent, 




1.0564 


.9740 


.8638 


1 . 6542 


.6138 


1.4980 


1.0559 


Iron, effluent, .... 




.4018 


.5203 


.3779 


.0696 


.1298 


.0306 


.0802 



The cost of maintaining the filter-beds has been as follows, in- 
cluding the cost of constructing concrete carriers on two beds : — ■ 



Labor, . . • . 
Supplies and expenses, 



Cost per million gallons treated, 



$4,383 40 
194 51 

$4,577 91 
$12 28 



84 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



Hydro-electric Power Station. 

The hydro-electric power station at the Wachusett Dam was 
operated on 286 days during the year. The daily output has varied 
from the minimum amount which the Connecticut River Transmis- 
sion Company. is required to take under its contract to the full 
capacity of the plant. The following are the statistics relative to 
the operation of the station : — 

Quantity of energy sold to Connecticut River Transmission Com- 
pany (kilowatt hours), ........ 7,033,457 

Quantity of energy used at power station (kilowatt hours), . . 14,393 

Quantity of energy used at Sewerage Pumping Station (kilowatt 

hours), 117,280 

Total quantity of energy generated (kilowatt hours), . . 7,165,130 

Quantity of water used (gallons), 33,270,900,000 

Average effective head (feet), 90.9 

Kilowatt hours generated per million foot gallons, .... 2 . 369 

Efficiency of station (per cent.), 75.4 



Earnings : — 

Energy supplied Connecticut River Transmis- 
sion Company at $5.30 per thousand kilo- 
watt hours, 

Labor supplied Connecticut River Transmission 
Company, 

Energy supplied power and sewerage pumping 
stations, credited at $5.30 per thousand kilo- 
watt hours, 



Cost of operating station : — 
Labor, .... 
Fuel for heating building, 
Repairs and appliances, . 
Oil and waste, . 
Small supplies, 
Taxes, .... 



$37,277 32 



29 50 



697 87 



$5,311 65 

90 00 

157 83 

83 03 

239 45 

3,087 50 



$38,004 69 



8,969 46 



Net earnings, . . . . ' . 
Net earnings per thousand kilowatt hours generated, 



$29,035 23 
$4,052 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 85 

Engineering. 

In addition to the supervision of work already described the 
engineering force has had charge of miscellaneous work as follows : — 

In connection with the location of possible sources of pollution a 
survey has been made and plans prepared of about 75 per cent, of 
the premises on the Wachusett watershed. 

A survey of all property owned by the Board in Cedar Swamp 
and along the Sudbury River from Westborough to Framingham 
Reservoir No. 2 has been completed and plans of the same are 
now nearly finished. A survey has also been made of all land lines 
around Ashland Reservoir and in the swamp at the head of Hop- 
kinton Reservoir. 

In compliance with chapter 50 of the Resolves of 1914, a special 
report has been prepared and an estimate made of the cost of put- 
ting Spot Pond Brook in such condition that it will properly receive 
and carry off the water which may flow into it under ordinary cir- 
cumstances. 

Appended to this report are tables giving the amount of work 
done and other information relative to contracts, a series of tables 
relating to the maintenance of the Metropolitan Water Works, includ- 
ing the rainfall, yield of sources of supply, consumption of water in 
the different districts, the number of service pipes, meters and fire 
hydrants in the Metropolitan Water District, and a summary of sta- 
tistics for the year 1914. 

Respectfully submitted, 

DEXTER BRACKETT, 

Chief Engineer. 
Boston, January 1, 1915. 



86 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 



EEPOET OF ENGINEER OF SEWERAGE WORKS. 



To the Metropolitan Water and Sewerage Board. 

Gentlemen : — The following report of the operations of the Met- 
ropolitan Sewerage Works for the year ending December 31, 1914, 
is respectfully submitted : — 

Organization. 

The Engineer has charge of the design and construction of all new 
works, and of the maintenance and operation of all the works con- 
trolled by the Metropolitan Water and Sewerage Board for removing 
sewage from the twenty-four municipalities which comprise the Met- 
ropolitan Sewerage Districts. 

The Engineer has had the following assistants: — 

Henry T. Stiff, Division Engineer, in charge of office 

and drafting room, of construction 
of the new Mystic sewer, North 
Metropolitan System, and of the 
relief outfall, High-level sewer at 
Nut Island. 

Clarence A. Moore, .... Assistant Engineer, in charge of main- 
tenance studies and records. 

Arthur F. F. Haskell, .... Assistant Engineer, in charge of survey 

work and field work in connection 
with the new Mystic sewer con- 
struction and with the relief out- 
fall, High-level sewer at Nut 
Island. 

In addition to the above, the average number of engineering and 
other assistants employed during the year was 13, which includes 1 
instrumentman, 5 inspectors, 2 draftsmen, 3 rodmen and engineering 
assistants and 2 stenographers. 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



87 



METROPOLITAN SEWERAGE DISTRICTS. 
Areas and Populations. 

During the year no changes have been made in the extent of the 
sewerage districts as given in the last annual report. 

The populations of the districts, as given in the following table, 
are based on the census of 1910. 

Table showing Areas and Estimated Populations within the Metropolitan Sew- 
erage Districts, as of December 31, 1914- 





City or Town. 


Area (Square 
Miles). 


Estimated 
Population, 




Arlington, .......... 


5.20 


13,180 




Belmont, 




















4.66 


6,680 




Boston (portions c 


>f), 


















3.45 


110,490 • 





Cambridge, . 




















6.11 


111,500 


c3 


Chelsea, 




















2.24 


37,450 


•_3 


Everett, 




















3.34 


39,100 


O 


Lexington, 1 . 




















5.11 


4,520 


O O 
(H T 1 


Maiden, 




















5.07 


49,480 




Medford, 




















8.35 


26,810 




Melrose, 




















3.73 


17,060 


Revere, 




















5.86 


21,830 


-4-3 
r-l 


Somerville, . 




















3.96 


85,390 


O 


Stoneham , 




















5.50 


8,180 


Wakefield, . 




















7.65 


12,490 




Winchester, . 




















5.95 


10,380 




Winthrop, 




















1.61 


12,010 




Woburn, 




















12.71 


16,380 




oo ^n 


coo fton 




yu. ou 


Oo^,y»3U 


d 


'Boston (portions of), . 


24.96 


228,850 


o 


Brookline, 










6.81 


31,600 


So 


Dedham, l 














- 






9.40 


9,860 




Milton, 




















12.59 


8,720 


to 


Newton, 




















16.88 


44,040 


^s 


Quincy, 




















12.56 


36,860 


-d 


Waltham, 




















13.63 


30,690 


"5 


[Watertown, . 




















4.04 


14,620 


O 


inn °7 


10K. ''Mfi 


CO 


±UU. 0/ 


4UD,Z'1U 




Totals, . 




















191.37 


988,170 



1 Part of town. 



METROPOLITAN SEWERS. 
Sewers Purchased and Constructed and their Connections. 

During the year there have been built 1 .249 miles of Metropolitan 
sewer within the sewerage districts, so that there are now 107.135 
miles of Metropolitan sewers. Of this total, 9.642 miles of sewers, 
with the Quincy pumping station, have been purchased from cities 
and towns of the districts, the remaining 97.493 miles of sewers and 
other works having been constructed by the Metropolitan boards. 

The locations, lengths and sizes of these sewers are given in the 
following tables, together with other data referring to the public and 
special connections with the systems: — 



8S 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



North Metropolitan Sewerage System. 
Location, Length and Sizes of Sewers, with Public and Special Connections. 







TO 
JO 


■ i 

© S • 


Special Connections. 


















i 






.3d 


City or Town. 


Size of Sewers. 


j3 




Character or Location of 


o 

u +3 
d ® 

S a 






4= 




•o.S £ 


Connection. 






o 


43 ja 




^o 




• 


Hi 


PM 




fc 


Boston: — 












Deer Island, 


6' 3" to 9' 0", 


1.367 


4 

[ 


Shoe factory, .... 


1 


East Boston, 


9'0" to l'O", . . 


5.467 


25 


Middlebrook Wool-combing 

Co., 

Navy Yard, .... 


1 

8 


Charlestown, 


6' 7"X7'5"to 1' 0", . 


3.292 


14 i 


Almshouse, .... 

Private building, . 

Club house, .... 


1 
1 
1 


Winthrop, 


9'0", ." '. 


2 864 


13- 


Fire Department Station, 
Private building, . 
Bakery, .... 
Rendering works, . 


1 
1 
1 
1 


Chelsea, 


8'4"X9'2"to 1' 10"X2'4", 


5.230 


13. 


Metropolitan Water Works 
blow-off, .... 

Chelsea Water Works blow- 
off, 

Metropolitan Water Works 
blow-off 

Cameron Appliance Co., 

Shultz-Goodwin Co., 


1 

2 

1 
1 
1 


Everett, 


8'2"X8' 10"to4'8"X5' 1", 


2.925 


7- 


Andrews- Wasgatt Co., . 
National Metallic Bed Co., . 

Linoide Co. 

Factory, .... 
New England Structural Co., 
Metropolitan Water Works 


1 
1 
1 
1 
1 


Maiden, . 


4' 6"X4' 10" to l'O", . 


5.8441 


33- 


blow-off, .... 
Private buildings, . 
Private buildings, . 


1 
169 
113 


Melrose, . 


4' 6"X4' 10" to 10", . 


6.099 2 


36. 


Factory, .... 
Railroad station, . 
Park Department bath house, 
Harvard dormitories, 


1 
1 
1 

2 


Cambridge, . 


5'2"X5'9" to 1'3", . 


7.209 


40. 


Slaughterhouse, 

City Hospital, 

Street railway machine shop, 

Tannery, .... 


1 
' 3 

1 
1 










Slaughterhouses (3), 
Car-house, .... 
Somerville Water Works blow- 


1 
1 


Somerville, 


6'5"X7'2"to 10", . 


3.577 


11- 


off, 

Street railway power house, . 

Stable, _ 

Rendering works, . 
Railroad scale pit, . 


1 
1 
1 
1 

1 








' 


Armory building, . 


1 


Medford, 


4'8"X5' l"to 10", . 


5.713 


23. 

- 


Private buildings, . 

Stable, 

Police substation, . 
Tannery, .... 
Private buildings, . 


8 
1 
1 
4 
4 


Winchester, . 


4' 6" to 1' 3", . 


9.470 


19 = 

| 


Gelatine factory, . 

Stable, 


1 
1 




■ 




Railroad station, . 


1 




1 






Felt works, .... 


1 


Stoneham, 


1' 3" to 10", 


0.010 


4 


- 


- 


Woburn, 


1' 10"X2'4" to 1' 3", . 


0.933 


3 
f 


Glue factory, .... 
Private buildings, . 


1 
145 


Arlington, 


V 6" to 10", 


3.520 3 


381 


Railroad station, . 
Car-house, .... 
Post office, .... 


1 

3 
1 



1 Includes 1.84 miles of sewer purchased from the city of Maiden. 

2 Includes .736 of a mile of sewer purchased from the city of Melrose. 

3 Includes 2.631 miles of sewer purchased from the town of Arlington. 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD, 



89 



Location, Length and Sizes of Sewers with Public and Special Connections 

— Concluded. 







Size of Sewers. 


JO 

i 

a 

bfi 

a 
© 
t-1 


Public Connec- 
tions, Decem- 
ber 31, 1914. 


Special Connections. 


City or Town. 


Character or Location of 
Connection. 


.So 

o 

fcnVp 

& <- 

S a 

1° 


Belmont, 1 
Wakefield, 1 
Revere, . 


4'0"to3'0", . . . 


0.136 


3 
1 

2 


- 


- 




63. 656 2 


289 


503 



1 The Metropolitan sewer extends but a few feet into the towns of Belmont and Wakefield. 

2 Includes 2.787 miles of Mystic valley sewer in Medford, Winchester and Woburn, running parallel with 
the Metropolitan sewer. 



South Metropolitan Sewerage System. 
Location, Length and Sizes of Sewers, with Public and Special Connections. 







TO 

J5 


• i 

05 S • 

" Or* 


Special Connections. 






a ri 


City or Town. 


Size of Sewers. 


.2 


! CC 

s, D 
31, 1 


Character or Location of 




0> o3 






Of) 
PI 

O 


3 fl u 

JD.9 © 


Connection. 


B a 






3 +> J2 




PO 






H-l 


Ph 




'A 








( 


Tufts Medical School, . 


1 


Boston: — 
Back Bay, . 








Private house, 


1 


6' 6" to 3' 9", . 


1.500 1 


15 j 


Administration Building, 
Boston Park Department, . 


1 










Simmons College buildings, . 


1 










Art Museum, .... 


2 


Brighton, . 


5'9"X6'0"to 12", . 


6.010 2 


14 


Abattoir, .... 


3 








( 


Chocolate works, . 
Machine shop, 


2 
1 


Dorchester, 


3'X4' to 2' 6"X2' 7", . 


2.870 ? 


13j 


Paper mill, .... 
Private buildings, . 
Edison Electric Company Sta- 
tion 


1 
3 

1 


Hyde Park, 


10'7"Xll'7"to4'0"X4'l", 


4.527 


"{ 


Mattapan Paper Mills, . 
Private buildings, . 


1 

2 


Roxbury, . 


C 6"X7'to4'0", 


1.430 




- 


- 








, f 


Parental School, 


1 


West Roxbury, . 


9'3"X10'2"to 12", . 


7.600 


13 


Lutheran Evangelical Church, 


1 








Private buildings, . 


4 


Brookline, 


6' 6"X7'0" to 8", 


2.540 4 


12 


Private building, . 


1 


Dedham, 


4'X4' 1" to 3' 9"X3' 10", . 


2.350 


7 


- 


- 


Hull, . 


60" pipe, .... 


0.750 


- 


- 


- 


Milton, . 


ll'X12'to8", 


3.600 


21 


Private buildings, . 


2 


Newton, 


4'2"X4'9"tol'3", . 


2.911 


6 


Private houses, 


6 


Quincy, . 


11'3"X12' 6" to 24" pipe, . 


6.640 


,4{ 


Metropolitan Water Works 
blow-off, .... 


1 


Waltham , 


3'6"X4'0", 


0.001 


\ 


Factories, .... 


2 


Watertown, . 


4'2"X4'9" to 12", 


0.7505 


5 I 


Stanley Motor Carriage Co., . 
Knights of Pythias building, 


1 
1 




43.479 


138 


40 



1 Includes .355 of a mile of sewer purchased from the city of Boston. 

2 Includes .446 of a mile of, pipe and concrete sewers built for the use of the city of Boston; also .026 
of a mile of sewer purchased from the town of Watertown. 

3 Includes 1.24 miles of sewer purchased from "tho city of Boston. 

4 Includes .158 of a mile of pipe sewer built for tho use of tho town of Brookline. 
6 Includes .025 of a mile of sewer purchased from the town of Watertown. 



90 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



Information relating to areas, populations, local sewer connections 
and other data for the whole Metropolitan Sewerage District appears 



in the following table: 



North Metropolitan District. 



Area 

(Square 
Miles). 



90.50 



Estimated 

Total 
Population. 



582,930 



Miles of 
Local Sewer 
connected . 



728.73 



Estimated 

Population 

contributing 

Sewage. 



524,330 



Ratio of 

Contributing 

Population 

to Total 
Population 
(PerCent.). 



).9 



Connections made 
with Metro- 
politan Sewers. 



Public. 



289 



Special. 



503 



South Metropolitan District. 


100.87 


405,240 


610.03 


275,310 


67.9 


138 


40 


Entire Metropolitan District. 


191.37 


988,170 


1,338.76 


799,640 


80.9 


427 


543 



Of the estimated gross population of 988,170 on December 31, 
1914, 799,640, representing 80.9 per cent., were on that date con- 
tributing sewage to the Metropolitan sewers, through a total length 
of 1,338.76 miles of local sewers owned by the individual cities and 
towns of the district. 

These sewers are connected with the Metropolitan System by 427 
public and 543 special connections. During the current year there 
has been an increase of 31 miles of local sewers connected with the 
Metropolitan System, and 13 public and 11 special connections have 
been added. 

CONSTRUCTION. 

NORTH METROPOLITAN SEWERAGE SYSTEM. 

Section 69 — New Mystic Sewer. — North Metropolitan 

System. 

As noted in last year's report this section was divided into two 
contracts. The particulars of this section and contracts are as fol- 
lows: — 

Date of contract No. 110, January 2, 1914. 

Length of section covered by this contract, 2,300 feet. 

Name of contractor, Henry Spinach Contracting Co. 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 91 

Average depth of cut, 10 feet. 

Diameter of circular concrete sewer, 42 inches. 

Division Engineer in charge of construction, Henry T. Stiff. 

Assistant Engineer, A. F. F. Haskell. 

This contract covered that portion of Section 69 extending from 
the southerly side of Alt. Vernon Street, Winchester, through private 
land of David N. Skillings, then through land of the town of Win- 
chester, then in a private way to other land of said town, then through 
said town land and private lands of John S. Lynam and Antonio 
Piluso and extending a short distance in the location of the Boston & 
Maine Railroad to sewer Station 23 + 00 near Judkins Pond. 

Owing to severity of weather, work was not started on this con- 
tract until about March 1, 1914. No excavating machinery w T as 
used. Pile foundation was placed from Station 8 + 05 to Station 
14 + 20 and from Station 15 + 95 to Station 18 + 43. No large 
amount of ground water was found except at about Station 5 + 50, 
wmere an 8-inch centrifugal pump was used. Work under this con- 
tract was completed November 7, 1914. 

The remainder of the section was let as Contract No. Ill and 
extended from Station 23 + to Station 49 + 69. Some particulars 
of this portion and contract are as follows : — 

Date of contract No. Ill, January 2, 1914. 

Length of portion covered by this contract, 2,669 feet. 

Name of contractor, Henry Spinach Contracting Co. 

Average depth of cut, 20 feet. 

Diameter of circular concrete sewer, 36 inches. 

Division Engineer in charge of construction, Henry T. Stiff. 

Assistant Engineer, A. F. F. Haskell. 

This contract covered that portion of Section 69 which extends 
northward from a point in the location of the Boston & Maine Rail- 
road near Judkins Pond, through the location of said road on a 
centre line 10 feet from the easterly side of said railroad land for a 
distance of 2,350 feet, then turns to w r estw T ard and crosses under the 
tracks of said railroad, then under Abcrjona River, then across 
Section 45 of Metropolitan sewer built in 1893, to a point in land 
of said railroad which is the beginning of Section 70, new Mystic 
sewer, a total length of 2,669 feet. 

From Station 23 + 00 to Station 46 + 00 the sewer was built in 
fine sand which contained a small amount of water. Owing to the 



92 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

excessively dry season this section of sewer was constructed without 
difficulty. At Station 46 + 00 the material changed to sand and 
gravel, and a trench excavating machine was used. 

The crossing of the Aberjona River was effected by means of two 
lines of 20-inch cast-iron pipe surrounded by concrete laid on grade 
of sewer. A concrete head house was constructed at either end of 
the crossing with facilities for controlling the flow in the pipes. 
From Station 48 + 67 to Station 49 + 63 pile foundation was placed. 

At the crossing of Sec don 45 of the Metropolitan sewer constructed 
in 1893 a special controlling manhole was built so that sewage from 
Woburn and Stoneham can be turned through either the old Metro- 
politan sewer or the new Mystic sewer. 

By arrangement between the Railroad Company and the Con- 
tractor the surface over the sewer from about Station 27 to about 
Station 46 was left at a considerably lower elevation than it was 
formerly. Work under this contract was completed December 19, 
1914. 

Section 70. — New Mystic Sewek. — North Metropolitan 

System. 

This section was placed under contract in 1913 and a general 
statement regarding it is in the report of that year. About 300 
feet remained to be constructed on January 1, 1914. This work was 
finished May 4, 1914. 

Section 57A. — North Metropolitan System. 

Chapter 259 of the Acts of 1914 directed the Metropolitan Water 
and Sewerage Board to construct a branch Metropolitan sewer to 
receive sewage from the southwestern part of the town of Revere. 
This Act, which was passed at the request of Revere, provided that 
the cost of construction of this branch sewer should be assessed upon 
the town. 

The section of sewer built under this Act extends in Chelsea and 
Revere from Station 29 + 42 of Section 57, North Metropolitan Sew- 
erage System, northerly through lands of H. W. Pratt, Edward E. 
Mills and Elizabeth Clark to a point in Fenno Street in Revere near 
the Chelsea and Revere boundary and consists of a 15-inch Akron 
pipe surrounded by Portland concrete built in firm clay ground. 
Some particulars of this section and contract are as follows: — 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 93 

Date of contract, May 12, 1914. 

Length of section, 1,032 feet. 

Name of contractor, G. M. Bryne Co. 

Average depth of cut, 6 feet. 

Diameter of pipe sewer, 15 inches. 

Division Engineer in charge of construction, H. T. Stiff. 

Assistant Engineer, C. A. Moore. 

This contract was completed July 10, 1914. 

Deer Island Outfall Extension. 

Chapter 344 of the Acts of 1914 directed the Metropolitan Water 
and Sewerage Board to extend the existing Deer Island outfall. 
This Act was passed so late in the season that the necessary permits 
from the United States Government and the Directors of the Port of 
Boston could not be secured in time to warrant the placing of this 
work under contract this year. 

The nature and location of this work are such that it can be 
carried on only in a few months of the year. Studies have been 
made and plans prepared ready for placing the same under con- 
tract early in the coming year. 

SOUTH METROPOLITAN SEWERAGE SYSTEM. 

Section 43. — Relief Outfall. — Nut Island. 

At the time of constructing the High-level sewer only two 60-inch 
cast-iron outfall lines of the proposed five lines were constructed. 
These had been able satisfactorily to discharge the flow until the 
flood period of the winter of 1913 and 1914. During some of the 
storms the sewage rose to such an elevation in the sewer as to 
indicate the necessity of at once furnishing additional outfall ca- 
pacity. 

A study was made for an additional line of 60-inch cast-iron pipe 
to extend about 1,200 feet into tide water to a point where the 
channel has a depth of 20 feet at low water. Contracts were pre- 
pared of which the particulars are as follows: — 

Contract No. 118 for 60-inch cast-iron pipe: — 

Date of contract, July 15, 1914. 

Material, 60-inch cast-iron pipe and specials, 724 tons. 

Name of contractor, Camden Iron Works. 



94 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

Contract No. 120 for placing 60-inch outfall pipe in position: — 
Date of contract, August 29, 1914. 
Length of section covered by contract, 1,400 feet. 
Name of contractor, W. H. Ellis & Son Co. 
Division Engineer in charge, H. T. Stiff. 
Assistant Engineer, A. F. F. Haskell. 

This line is the most westerly of the five lines originally proposed. 
The contract provides for a pile foundation in that portion extending 
under the bed of the harbor and a concrete reinforcement around 
that part constructed on shore with special reinforcements at the 
outfall. 

At this time the outfall curve has been placed, about 800 feet of 
trench has been dredged and about 96 feet of pipe has been placed 
in the dredged trench. About 200 feet of pipe has also been laid 
from Nut Island screen-house to near low water line. To control 
the flow in this new outfall line a 60-inch Coffin Valve Company 
sluice gate operated by hydraulic force was purchased and placed in 
the station by day labor. 

24-Inch Brick Siphon Crossing. — Section 70. — High-Level 

Sewer. 

In extending its sewerage system, the city of Boston was obliged 
to cross Section 70 of the High-level sewer at Washington Street, 
West Roxbury. At this place the Metropolitan sewer is built through 
very find sand carrying much water. It was felt that construction 
under this main trunk sewer in such ground was difficult and some- 
what dangerous and arrangements were made whereby the Metro- 
politan Water and Sewerage Board agreed to assume the risk and 
do the construction on condition that the city of Boston should 
reimburse it for the cost. Contract and plans were made and bids 
for construction by compressed air process were solicited. Following 
are particulars of the contract as made : — 

Date of contract No. 122, November 21, 1914. 

Length of 24-inch brick siphon structure, 42 feet. 

Lump sum bid, $4,500. 

Name of contractor, Charles A. Haskin. 

Division Engineer in charge of construction, H. T. Stiff. 

Assistant Engineer, C. A. Moore. 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 95 

At the present time the contract is completed excepting a small 
amount of brickwork in one manhole and some backfilling. The 
work was done without any injury to the Metropolitan sewer. 

MAINTENANCE. 

Scope of Work and Force Employed. 

The maintenance of the Metropolitan Sewerage System includes 
the operation of 7 pumping stations, the Nut Island screen-house 
and 107.135 miles of Metropolitan sewers, receiving the discharge 
from 1,338.76 miles of town and city sewers at 427 points, together 
with the care and study of inverted siphons under streams and in 
the harbor. 

The permanent maintenance force includes 165 men, of whom 101 
are employed on the North System and 64 on the South System. 
These are subdivided as follows: engineers and other employees at 
the pumping stations, North Metropolitan System, 62; and on main- 
tenance, care of sewer lines, buildings and grounds, 39 men, includ- 
ing foremen; South Metropolitan System, 34 engineers and other 
employees within the pumping stations; and 30 men, including fore- 
men, on maintenance, care of sewer lines, buildings and grounds. 

The regular work of this department, in addition to the operation 
of the pumping stations, has consisted of routine work of cleaning 
and inspecting sewers and siphons, caring for tide gates, regulators 
and overflows, measuring flow in sewers, inspection of connections 
with the Metropolitan sewers, care of pumping stations and other 
buildings and grounds, and the maintenance of the ferry at Shirley 
Gut for transporting employees and supplies in connection with the 
operation of the Deer Island pumping station. 

In addition to these regular duties other work has been done by 
this department as follows: — 

Deer Island Pumping Station and Dwelling. 

The four-tenement dwelling house at Deer Island for use of 
employees in the station has been painted outside during the year. 

The wharf built in 1892 and the coal run built in 1895 are in poor 
condition and considerable repairs have been necessary during the 
year. 

All work was done by maintenance employees. 



96 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

East Boston Pumping Station. 

On June 1,. 1914, at about 10.20 a.m. a violent explosion occurred 
in the old screen-house chamber which entirely destroyed the screen 
building and caused the death of six men and severe injury to two 
others. At the time workmen were engaged in washing the sewer 
walls preparatory to making changes in the channels necessary to 
the introduction of new screening machinery. 

The sewage in the suction sewer had been pumped down several 
feet below normal elevation and the odor of gasolene was noticeable. 
Incandescent electric light was being used in the chamber. No other 
known source of possible ignition was present. No damage was done 
to the underground structures or passages. The windows, doors and 
skylights of the main pumping station building were damaged. No 
interruption of pumping service occurred and only slight damage to 
one engine (No. 1) was done. N^ 

Contracts for repairs occasioned by the explosion were made with 
the following parties: Contract No. 118 under date of July 24, 1914, 
with the S. H. Pomeroy Company, Incorporated, provided for re- 
pairs to windows and doors. This contract was completed December 
11, 1914. Contract No. 119 under date of July 25, 1914, with 
E. Van Noorden & Company, provided for repairs to skylights. 
This contract was completed August 21, 1914. Contract No. 121 
under date of October 1, 1914, with the J. Caddigan Company, pro- 
vided for the construction of a new screen building. 

The new screen building, 39' x 48', referred to above, consists of 
the superstructure only of a brick building trimmed with Deer 
Island granite with concrete roof similar in all respects to the main 
pumping station building. All foundations were placed by the main- 
tenance force. 

The new building is considerably larger than the former one, 
being carried out about ten feet nearer to the railroad location on 
the west. A system of forced ventilation has been installed to pro- 
tect the sewer channels and chambers from the accumulation of 
dangerous gases. 

At the present time the building is constructed to the elevation 
of the roof girders and the latter are in place ready to receive the 
concrete roof. 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 97 

Charlestown Pumping Station. 

Extensive repairs have been made on pumping engine No. 1. 
For several years this pump has been run only in times of emer- 
gency, as it was less economical in operation than the other pumps. 
Changes made in the elevation of the impeller wheel have increased 
the capacity from a maximum rate of 34,000,000 to a maximum rate 
of 42,000,000 gallons per 24 hours. This work was done by main- 
tenance mechanics. 

Malden River Siphon. 

The action of frost had badly damaged the riprap slopes at the 
head houses of the Maiden River siphon. During the year these 
have been relaid and repaired, the work being done by the main- 
tenance force. 

Nut Island Station. 

A reinforced concrete fence has been constructed from a point 
near the wharf on Nut Island along the eastern side of the roadway 
over the bar to the mainland, a distance of about 1,400 feet. This 
was done by the maintenance force. 

Drainage from Tanneries, Gelatine and Glue Works in Win- 
chester, WOBURN AND StONEHAM. 

Five men and a foreman have been employed during a part of the 
year in flushing and cleaning the Metropolitan sewer through the 
tannery districts of Winchester, Woburn and Stoneham. 

All the tanneries and glue works of the district now have settling 
tanks of substantial size. This method of treatment has very greatly 
reduced the amount of sludge material entering the Metropolitan 
sewers and has materially lessened the cost of maintenance of the 
sewers in this district. 

The following table gives details of settling tanks introduced to 
date, showing the operations of same with the amount of sludge col- 
lected and removed : — 



98 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc 



Table of Semi-fluid Sludge removed from Settling Basins at the Tanneries, Gela- 
tine and Glue Works in Winchester, Woburn and Stoneham. 









^5 


.i^"* 


T3 M O 








O) 




"3-@-9 








c3^ 


Oi o^" 1 


=o a & 






Inside 


O i-i 
0> c3 




*z~ 

zn 0)3 


Location of BasiiW 


Basin put in 
Operation. 


Measure- 
ment 
of Basin 




Quant 
ludge 
the ; 
iTards] 


ntity 
remov 
xv 19) 






(Feet). 


o += 

u bjO 

o> c 

3TS 


verage ( 
fluid S 
during 
(Cubic ^ 


otal Qua 
Sludge ] 
the Ye; 
Yards). 








5? 


< 


H 


Beggs & Cobb Company, Basin No. 1, 


Jan. 15, 1910 


47.0'X 23.0 


6 


136.00 


816.00 


Beggs & Cobb Company, Basin No. 2, 


May 9, 1910 


47.0 X 23.0 


9 


135.40 


1,218.60 


Beggs & Cobb Company, Basin No. 3, 


Oct. 19, 1911 


51.0 X 25.0 


4 


160.40 


641.60 


S. C.Parker & Son, 1 


Aug. 1, 1910 


48.3 X 23.0 


- 


- 


- 


American Hide and Leather Company, 


Nov. 15, 1910 


48.0 X 23.1 


4 


140.00 


560.00 


Factory D. 












C. H. Furbush & Co.,2 . . . . 


July 15, 1910 


49.0 X 23.2 


- 


- 


- 


B. F. Kimball & Co., 


Dec. 10, 1910 


47.2 X 23.0 


2V 2 


106.84 


267.10 


E. Cummings Leather Company, 


Nov. 1, 1910 


45.9 X 22.6 


3 


97.60 


292.80 


W. P. Fox & Sons, 


July 12, 1910 


47.8 X 22.6 


4H 


135.20 


608.40 


T. F. Boyle & Co., 


Sept. 15, 1910 


48.1 X 23.1 


- 


- 


- 


Bay State Leather Company, 3 . 


Jan. 9, 1911 


46.8 X 22.9 


4 


134.32 


537.28 


Van Tassel 1 Leather Company, 4 


Mayl, 1911 j 


10.2 X 14.5 
43.8 X 19.5 


10 
1 


3.00 

38.00 


30.00 
38.00 


American Glue Company, 


Oct. 1, 1910 


47.1 X 23.0 


4 


136.36 


545.44 


Winchester Manufacturing Company, 


1902 | 


35.5 X 24.7 
67.2 X 12.0 


} « 


58.74 


234.96 


Total, 


- 


- 


- 


- 


5,790.18 



1 Successors to American Hide and Leather Company. 

2 Successors to Cottle Leather Company. 

3 Successors to Champion Tanning Company. 

4 Successors to Stoneham Tanning Company. 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



99 





o 


CO 






-*o 


co 






PS 


<<*, 






r^o 


«s 






<>> 








© 


^ 






Dh 


CO 






'-pi 


O 






^ 








•40 


PS 






PS 

s 1 


as 






*~ 
















->o 




CO 




=0 


co 






^ 


© 


O 
•<o 






J^ 


to 




^ 


^ 


© 
i-~o 

a, 

O 




-22 


r-8 

© 
?S 




o 


8 


PS 

■*o 






o 


o 




<o. 


CO 


p^ 




^ 


K 


^^ 






,© 

-to 
© 

^-o 

s 


8 

CO 


fc-H 


oo 






<5 


i"-o 


Oh 


to 


H 




CO 


P35 




e 




rO 


s 


&h 


•<o 










P5 


^ 


T-s 




© 


s* 


o 


W 




© 
<4r 


SJ 


£ 

H 




© 


m 


'^ 


s 


s= 






rO 


CO 


Ya 


* *N 


*^> 


<T> 


<; 


S 


10 


O 


tH 


<ii 


s 


•<s> 


o 
Pi 


CO 


© 
© 


PS 

r-o 


o 


.eo 




© 


K 


as» 


Os 


H 


>< 




H 


to 


^ 


^H 




ps 


© 




Ps> 


"<o 
r-o> 


CO 

© 


H 


© 




PS 


O 




CO 

PS 
CO 


PS 




•<o 


53 


PS 




<» 




<» 




5i 


© 


?-* 






P-H 


^ 




^S 




<W 








■*o 




CO 


P^ 


PS 




s* 


sr 














^ 


>o 


•<o 




© 


53 


i — j 




&H 


• — 


£> 




~- 


*- 

Vj 


o 












C3 


o 


CO 
PS 




co 




<o 




oa 












T 1 






© 














O 


' ' 


PS) 




P?> 


CO 

PI 


'^5 



-^ ^ z: 

XS "T 1 '~ 



Ph 



o 

o 





< 


O 


0) 


c3 

o 














sd 


a 

c 

O 


bo 
CI 

l-t 






< 




bD 












S 


£ 


+3 




PI 


HH 







r, 




n 


u 

■2:2 




m 


e3 


+3 



33g£Sg 



«g.oo 



05 3 O 



TS c3 0"H ofl 



•+J cl— < S . 
c3 aj 03 — fH 

"■+3 i- 1 H P •+-> 
mpn PL, 

W 



13 8--S ar 



<33' 



>,§§ 



^ o 

+= h S3'" O--* 
a oj S _i m += 



•43 B S >^ 

ra SSfL, fe g S3 

h* -la 



« S3 



is A A S » 
£■« - 



O ' 



Ph 



COOO^OOOOOONrtlClNOOiOCHO' 



SlONNOOrHOOOOMCOOlMlOrHCOiaN'* CD 
Cv> I 



£-< 



«l 



w g g , -d 

^ § S ^ aj 

B h3 5; O o 

S«„ ® u 2 



O 



f"3 HOO'f'^NMNHtOiniOrtOOtOlOiHffl 

a i 

rHCqcqi:o>OCOHCDMOOlOC<|lOlO'*NlOlO 






rtHHHCOHO>OMMrtOOHHO 



ooooooooooooooooooo 

OH<#lOOOOfflU5005i-lOOOOOO»000>(Nm 
COO^^HTllONlOMXCOCOiHrHOTtllOOO 



o o ooo oooooooooo oo lo 

CONiOWO^N-^tDlOCOOt^tOniNffl o 

t-T^hco io ^c^Tth cq"oJ" co co c£so-<£c> to CO OO 

rtfflMCO-*iH^OOOIN i— I i— I 



TjUMroNO'fNtOOlOlfllQlOlfltO'O lO 



I WOOO'-iaiNCqrHNONOOMCON I oo 
WfflOOOlOTHCONMrHOrHQOtNroN o 

CnT-^'cO ■^CO'cO lO cd">0 lO r-TrH i— I CO 



cu <u o 
S3 S3 S3 



ts ^d ts 
d a) 0) 
S3 S3 S3 



sas BBS 

ooo ooo 

..ooo. .ooo 

■"d'Cid 'OtJ 'O 

S3 S3 S3 S3 S3 S3 

fc#> o3c3c3 ^^oScScS ^^^^^^^ 
(Bo'oajaJsJcToDoaJ'i'DOiDJJJ) 

-^J-«J~^J-^J-^J-^ , -^ J -^ J ■+ J -^+ J •+ J + ; '-^- ;, -'- > -t^-'- ;, 
c3o3c3g3c3c3o3g3c3c3c3c3o3c3g3cog3 

C3c3c3c3c3c3cjo3c3c3c3c3c3c3c3coc3 . 

aftaaaaftftaaoHaoHaafta ' 



f: 



o 



■P®= 



a - p*2 



S3 S S 



^Ji*:Sun^f MO* 



S3 V 

;5 o 



0; 4;^^^ S3 2"° S3 

*a 53 nn r -7^ sa fe « -^ 



ci,o g.a c^j-r; > 



43 



! « O cz 



-/-■-*; PQ: 



:hJPh 



S3 2 

2 <== 

-S3 H 



O 02 



O J.H 



fl 


o 


• -H 


O 


ri 




0) 




o 

-5 


o 




d 

d 


' 




O 


c3 





(-1 
O 


d 


t3 


B 


•S S3 

3 8 

S3 O 


d 


CJ 


a 






03 


o 

a 


W 


o 

CO 


co 

"cQ 


CD 

H-» 


Cfl 

o 






/J 
m 


TS 

S3 


5 

t-s 


3 


en 

3 

2 
o 


3! 


a 

d 
■/. 

>> 


O 
CO 


w 


vH 


^ 


O 


-1 


r^ 


13 


cu 




>-. 




93 


a 


S3 
J 


1 








ij 




w 


W 



100 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



CO 

H 
<J 

CO 

H 
O 

o 

Eh 



p 
o 

GO 



"53 


i 

e 

o 


CO 




ff 


-to 


o 


R 


•<s> 


co 


e 


co 




5~ 




Qs 



^3 g 



53 
0^ 



co 



6q 



GO 

© CQ 
CO 

co <=> 

CO 2? 

GQ © 



co 2 

r-~i c-it 
•<S> © 

£* 

"§ "8 

53 co 

©^ 

• «v "*o 

§ s§ 

to r^ 

so 4s 

Si <* 

SQ © 
.co ° 



co 

o 

•<s> 

■HO 

e 

o 
Oh 

53 

*vo 

o 



Oh ~ 



535 

•<s> 

-*o 
3 



o 

co 
o 

© 



5s 



co 

535 
53 


•so 

53 


CO 

O 


S3 


•<s> 


53 


CO 


r-O 

3 


Cq 


o> 


eo 


t3 


C* 


53 


fei 


•<S> 


*w 


53 


S- 


4-- 




CO 


^ 


CO 

53 



CO 

^3 

co 

e 

© 

5>H 
-*3 






535 
-+o 

r-© 



CO 
*<o 
-to 


© 


•c*i 


ci 


o 






^ 


535 


© 




S£ 


a 


CO 


o 


53 


f^ 


<4i 


co 


*~ 



-2 

co 
53 

CO 

53s 



53 

&H 



Oh ■■§ 



O "Z CO Is . 



as 

,gci* a 
o-S.2 d 2 

.2.-2-3 S-S^ 

W o P o o 
O^-^ Ph 



a a 



^3 ' bD . 

5 S a © 
S 2 " B| 



r ^P^ P^ 



.9 a > 2 & 

■pflSa* 



^i« CD • 

■oo >» 22 a 

^^g-og.2 
cc^ co £_-£ -t> 

•S a fe >j3 a 
In apL, b g a 



a a 



Q tH 



■;oOjg 



o 
U 



■ IE ,.-d 

JJ o g a£ 



!5 

O 

H 
p 

-c! 

co 

a 

u 



CO ■<# 00 *-l t- oq CO OS CO l>- t>. OS rH 

o. 



Ph 



a lOOSOO CNI CO 0O OCO CO O CO CM 



'rHCOCOCO-^CO'^CNl'tlCSi-HOOCM 



cr 



a"ONlOiCOO'*CS'*N OSlO 
J2 •— l H »o lO I— I ■* Tt< t~- lO OO •<*< i— I 



' i— ICOCOt^CMCNICSJO'— lO 



55* 

co 



ooooooooooooo 

OOOOOTt<CN|05-HCMCNICO-HlOCO 
CO CN CO O CO CO NNrt CO lO 00 OO 

oT cnT rH ■* TlT O CO CO l>T oT ■>* i-H CD 
(M CO CO -^ H CO tr- »-l ^cOco 



oooooooooo loo 

CCP305M00NOC0I010 COOO 
■^ CN CO CO t^ ■rft O0 00 OS l>- i-( CN 



t^COt-CO»Ot--00iOCO-* 



H<#i-.00>IMNIMHIO | CM O 

— lt--lOt^OCNl<M-<tf<COCO — •'""' 
t>^Tj^C0t^CO|---*t-,C^I>- 

r* CO"-* CO c4~C0"»0 CM" 



ION 

eo-* 



T3 TJt3 T3^a T3 

co co © co co CO 

a a a a_c i a 

232 • • •££ • • 3 • 

aas aa a 

o o o o o o 

OOO , , .OO . , o. 

^ *T^ T3 *"^ T^ ^ 

a a a a a a 

c3^c3 „c3c3 fc „ c5 fc 

cocococococococococo coco 

+J+J+J04J-P+J4J+J-P "^"t^ 

7j7^c3c3c3c3^o3c5c3 c5 ci 

(Jj03c3c^C^c3o3C3raC3| TO C3 

cocococococococococo coco 

cocococococococococo coco 



cs a 



•-a 



M 



C3 (H 



PQffl co 
"""^.S a* 

1:3 a^ ° 

m to o - 



o S ^ 
is -a - 



•r^ 



T3 

>> 



a 

>> O 
^2+s 



■W .«&: 



g a c« a a £> 

■H'-a (nS tn^? 03 tc-a 



T-( t- 



a 
< 

a 
o 

a 
& 
o 



a 

a 
o 
a 



CO +i f- 

-a .2 ^ 

•so a 

t, OJ 53 

jo g Ph 

IN 

««! 

a &-2 

CO f-< -S 

5 a a 



CO 



-c3 ^a 

o .-a 

o 'a g 

03 3 ~ 

03 ^a (-■ 

(U CO g 

03 r< O 

<» .a "^ 

a g § 

O M j=! 

£ a S 



o 



«5 



o tfl 

■+* a 
„ l " ^a 

I °3 

03 c3 a 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



101 



<5 

GQ 

En 

i— i 

O 

Ph 

o 

H 



O 



A Q 

£ « 



^5 



&q 



05 



co 



o 



CO 

^2 



I 



^2 



o 
•^ 

O 

r— -s 

e 

^H 



CO 


Cj} 


8 


CO 
5» 


© 




e 


&H 


1— -i 


-2 


s. 


C5s 




8 
•c-s 




S 


8 


•<s> 


*u 


S-. 


CO 


1~S 


<45 


8 -7 


S-. 


© ^J 


Uw 


w S 



T3 



Ho 






© 

VS CO 



« a 

^ .2 

a 3 

CO O 



co 



o ^© 






ftn 



bs 



tio of 
tribut- 
Area 
to 

imate 
rea. 


CO to 


o 


CD 


u^ 




CM 


03 (i bD ;£<! 


^ CO 

CO 

Ph 


CO 


CO 


M 








S fl-u pi 








<"5 O fl O 


-l-> 






.2:2^ co-^Js 


G 05 

CO • 

Qc» 


OS 


Oi 

o 


Vt3 *£ H f-t O r-( 


CO 


OO 


CO 

Pm 






>> CO 








r-t ■*> • 


cc 






00 S O 


CO 






o3 +a _q bfi 
co c3 nrt: o3 


n^c^ 


t^ 


r~ 


^lO 


oo 


CO 


Ar 

ultim 

ti 

contr 

Sew 


^d 


<=> 


rJl 


— CR 


o 


OS 


CO 






9, a 3 co 


GO 
CO 






Estimal 

Area 

now co 

tributi: 

Sewag 


r3 c^i 


^t< 


CO 


«c° 


csi 

CO 


CO 


CO 






T3 








mate 

esent 

otal 

pula- 

ion. 


o 

CO 


o 


o 


OS 


CN 


CO 


h3 JH H o -p 
tnPs P-| 


OO 


o 


OO 


iO 


■* 


OS 


H 








Lated 
ation 
con- 
ting 
age. 


O 


o 


o 


CO 


y—t 


"# 


CO 


CO 


co 


Estim 

Popul 

now 

tribu 

Sewi 


to 


IC 
CSI 


OS 








T3 O >>23 S 








co oa._o 3 O 
■I S S3 >^ c 


1^ 

CO 


Oi 
CO 


00 

CO 
















, 








t-i ■ CO ?? . 








Numbe 
of Con- 
nection 
ith Loc 

Sewers 


l^ 


"* 




oo 


CO 
OS 


00 

oo 


(>• 


CO 








H 


? 
















-d 


T3 


tS 




o 


CO 


CO 




e 


G 


G 


1 










IS 


^2 


^2 




s 


s 


a 




o 


O 


o 




O 


CO 


o 






T3 


T3 




O 


G 
cj 


G 
c3 




CO 

c3 

t* 

83 

a 

CO 

CO 


CO 


CO 




-u 


-»J 




rt 


03 




H 

s 


03 




a 


a 


1 


CO 
CO 


CO 
CO 




•"^ (Zl 








tn Sx '" . ^ 


CO 


CO 


CO 


^O^i| 


t>- 


o 


t^- 


o c 


oo 

CM 


o 

CO 


00 
CO 
CO 




g" 


c" 






a 


08 








-fcj 












r', 








H 


o 


o 




Eh 


a 


a 




Cfi 


o 


o 




CO 


9 




-i 








03 




p^t 


s 






^ 


^3 


o 
H 




O 


3 

o 

CO 





102 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



PUMPING STATIONS. 

Capacity and Results. 

It will be noticed that the pumping expense per million foot- 
gallons in four stations is slightly in excess of that of last year. 
This is due principally to an increase in rate of wages of firemen and 
oilers in the large stations and of engineers in the small stations. 
This increase extended over practically seven months of the year. 
At the Ward Street Station considerable expense has been incurred 
by reason of repairs to the valves in the pumps. In one station only, 
East Boston, is there a reduction in the cost per million foot-gallons 
of pumping as compared with last year. 

Average Daily Volume of Sewage lifted at Each of the Six Principal Metropolitan 
Pumping Stations and the Quincy Sewage Lifting Station during the Year, 
as compared with the Corresponding Volumes for the Previous Year. 





Average Daily 


PUMPAGE. 


PUMPING STATION. 


Jan. 1, 1913, to 
Dec. 31, 1913. 


Jan. 1, 1914, to 
Dec. 31, 1914. 


Increase during the 
Year. 


Deer Island, 


Gallons. 
56,600,000 


Gallons. 

58,700,000 


Gallons. 
2,100,000 


Per Cent. 
3.7 


East Boston, 


54,600,000 


56,700,000 


2,100,000 


3.8 


Charlestown, 


33,700,000 


32,600,000 


1,100,0001 


3.3i 


Alewife Brook, 


3,614,000 


3,506,000 


108,000 1 


3.0i 


Quincy, 


4,154,000 


3,993,000 


161,0001 


3.91 


Ward Street (actual gallons pumped), 


27,056,000 


26,718,000 


338,000 * 


l:2i 


Quincy sewage lifting station, 


68,700 


84,500 


' 15,800 


23.0 



1 Decrease. 



North Metropolitan System. 
Deer Island Pumping Station. 

At this station are four submerged centrifugal pumps with im- 
pellers or wheels 8.25 feet in diameter, driven by triple-expansion 
engines of the Reynolds-Corliss type. 

Contract capacity of 1 pump: 100,000,000 gallons, with 19-foot lift. 

Contract capacity of 3 pumps: 45,000,000 gallons each, with 19-foot lift. 

Average duty for the year: 54,400,000 foot-pounds. 

Average quantity raised each day: 58,700,000 gallons. 

Force employed: 4 engineers, 1 relief engineer, 4 firemen, 4 oilers, 3 screenmen, 

1 relief screenman and 1 laborer. 
Coal used: New River and Sterling, costing from $3.94 to $4.65 per gross ton. 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



103 



Table of Approximate Quantities, Lifts and Duties at the Deer Island Pumping 
Station of the North Metropolitan System. 



Months. 


Total 
Pumpage 
(Gallons). 


Average 
per Day 
(Gallons). 


Minimum 

Day 
(Gallons.) 


Maximum 

Day 
(Gallons). 


Average 

Lift 
(Feet). 


Average 

Duty fft.-lbs. 

per 100 lbs. 

Coal). 


1914 

January, . 




2,092,200,000 


67,500,000 


51,800,000 


112,000,000 


11.59 


55,900,000 


February, 








1,845,200,000 


65,900,000 


54,900,000 


89,700,000 


11.56 


57,600,000 


March, 








2,404,900,000 


77,600,000 


53,400,000 


149,700,000 


11.78 


56,100,000 


April, 








2,399,000,000 


80,000,000 


61,700,000 


132,000,000 


11.77 


55,100,000 


May, 








2,381,900,000 


76,800,000 


52,700,000 


113,500,000 


11.30 


60,800,003 


June, 








1,629,900,000 


54,300,000 


43,800,000 


65,300,000 


10.61 


61,600,000 


July, 








1,604,800,000 


51,800,000 


40,400,000 


85,200,000 


10.73 


56,100,000 


August, . 








1,382,600,000 


44,600,000 


33,600,000 


73,700,000 


10.58 


49,800,000 


September, 








1,364,600,000 


45,500,000 


34,800,000 


56,200,000 


10.58 


56,700,000 


October, . 








1,406,300,000 


45,400,000 


35,600,000 


82,200,000 


10.99 


45,700,000 


November, 








1,298,300,000 


43,300,000 


33,800,000 


90,000,000 


10.70 


47,600,000 


December, 








1,582,600,000 


51,100,000 


36,700,000 


84,200,000 


10.73 


49,600,000 


Total, 


21,392,300,000 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


Average, 








- 


58,700,000 


44,400,000 


94,500,000 


11.08 


54,400,000 



Average Cost per Million Foot-gallons for Pumping at the Deer Island Station. 

Volume (21,392.3 Million Gallons) X Lift (11.08 Feet) = 237,026.7 Million Foot-gallons. 



Items. 


Cost. 


Cost per 
Million Foot- 
gallons. 


Labor, .......... 




$15,814 90 


$0.06672 


Coal 








10,625 60 


.04483 


Oil, 








351 55 


.00148 


Waste, 








104 86 


.00044 


Water, 








1,470 00 


.00620 


Packing, 








189 18 


oooso 


Miscellaneous supplies and renewals, .... 








1,767 32 


.00746 


Totals 


530,323 41 


$0.12793 


Labor at screens, ........ 








- 


.01302 



East Boston Pumpinr/ Station. 

At this station are four submerged centrifugal pumps, with im- 
pellers or w r heels 8.25 feet in diameter, driven by triple-expansion 
engines of the Reynolds-Corliss type. 



104 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



Contract capacity of 1 pump: 100,000,000 gallons with 19-foot lift. 

Contract capacity of 3 pumps: 45,000,000 gallons each, with 19-foot lift. 

Average duty for the year: 64,800,000 foot-pounds. 

Average quantity raised each day: 56,700,000 gallons. 

Force employed: 4 engineers, 2 relief engineers, 3 firemen, 1 relief fireman, 4 

oilers, 3 screenmen, 1 relief screenman, 3 helpers and 1 laborer. 
Coal used: New River and Sterling, costing from $3.89 to $4.54 per gross ton. 



Table of Approximate Quantities, Lifts and Duties at the East Boston Pumping 
Station of the North Metropolitan System. 



Months. 


Total 
Pumpage 

(Gallons). 


Average 
per Day 

(Gallons). 


Minimum 
Day 

(Gallons). 


Maximum 
Day 

(Gallons). 


Average 

Lift 
(Feet). 


Average 

Duty (ft.-lbs. 

per 100 lbs. 

Coal). 


1914 

January, . 




2,030,200,000 


65,500,000 


49,800,000 


110,000,000 


16.53 


59,400,000 


February, 






1,789,200,000 


63,900,000 


52,900,000 


87,700,000 


16.07 


59,000,000 


March, 






2,342,900,000 


75,600,000 


51,400,000 


147,700,000 


15.63 


64,000,000 


April, 






2,339,000,000 


78,000,000 


59,700,000 


130,000,000 


15.38 


66,900,000 


May, 






2,319,900,000 


74,800,000 


50,700,000 


111,500,000 


15.42 


71,000,000 


June, 






1,569,900,000 


52,300,000 


41,800,000 


63,300,000 


13.27 


64,100,000 


July, 






1,542,800,000 


49,800,000 


38,400,000 


83,200,000 


17.36 


62,400,000 


August, . 






1,320,600,000 


42,600,000 


31,600,000 


71,700,000 


18.42 


63,500,000 


September, 






1,304,600,000 


43,500,000 


32,800,000 


54,200,000 


17.31 


73,300,000 


October, . 






1,344,300,000 


43,400,000 


33,600,000 


80,200,000 


16.87 


62,900,000 


November, 






1,238,300,000 


41,300,000 


31,800,000 


88,000,000 


15.26 


62,200,000 


December, 






1,520,600,000 


49,100,000 


34,700,000 


82,200,000 


15.28 


69,000,000 


Total, 


20,662,300,000 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


Average, 






- 


56,700,000 


42,400,000 


92,500,000 


16.07 


64,800,000 



Average Cost per Million Foot-gallons for Pumping at the East Boston Station. 

Volume (20,662.3 Million Gallons) X Lift (16.07 Feet) = 332,043.2 Million Foot-gallons. 



Items. 


Cost. 


Cost per 
Million Foot- 
gallons. 


Labor, 








$21,268 89 


$0.06406 


Coal, 












12,842 92 


.03868 


Oil, . 












425 98 


.00128 


Waste, 












133 90 


.00040 


Water, 










s 


1,980 00 


.00596 


Packing, . 












70 00 


.00021 


Miscellaneous 


supplies and renewals, 










2,183 42 


.00658 


Totals, 


$38,905 11 


$0.11717 


Labor at screens, .... 










- 


.00940 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



105 



Charlestown Pumping Station. 

At this station are three submerged centrifugal pumps, two of 
them having impellers or wheels 7.5 feet in diameter, the other 8.25 
feet in diameter. They are driven by triple-expansion engines of 
the Reynolds-Corliss type. 

Contract capacity of 1 pump: 60,000,000 gallons with 8-foot lift. 

Contract capacity of 2 pumps: 22,000,000 gallons each, with 11-foot lift. 

Average duty for the year: 43,600,000 foot-pounds. 

Average quantity raised each day: 32,600,000 gallons. 

Force employed: 4 engineers, 1 relief engineer, 4 firemen, 3 oilers, 3 screenmen 

and 1 relief screenman. 
Coal used: New River and Sterling, costing from $4.05 to $4.50 per gross ton. 



Table of Approximate Quantities, Lifts and Duties at the Charlestown Pumping 
Station of the North Metropolitan System. 



Months. 


Total 
Pumpage 
(Gallons). 


Average 
Per Day 
(Gallons). 


Minimum 
Day 

(Gallons). 


Maximum 
Day 

(Gallons). 


Average 

Lift 
(Feet). 


Average 

Duty (ft.-lbs. 

per 100 lbs. 

Coal). 


1914 

January, . 




1,020,500,000 


32,900,000 


22,700,000 


55,800,000 


8.10 


41,000,000 


February, 






976,800,000 


34,900,000 


25,900,000 


46,500,000 


8.25 


47,800,000 


March, 






1,260,500,000 


40,700,000 


27,300,000 


69,100,000 


8.49 


42,400,000 


April, 






1,303,400,000 


43,400,000 


32,700,000 


69,100,000 


8.41 


48,800,000 


May, 






1,268,900,000 


40,900,000 


29,600,000 


59,300,000 


8.40 


48,800,000 


June, 






1,140,600,000 


38,000,000 


28,000,000 


50,900,000 


8.07 


54,000,000 


July, 






937,500,000 


30,200,000 


22,500,000 


54,900,000 


7.91 


39,000,000 


August, . 






838,700,000 


27,100,000 


20,100,000 


43,700,000 


7.53 


36,400,000 


September, 






794,700,000 


26,500,000 


20,500,000 


32,700,000 


8.04 


42,200,000 


October, . 






804,100,000 


25,900,000 


19,400,000 


46,300,000 


7.84 


37,200,000 


November, 






709,700,000 


23,700,000 


16,800,000 


50,800,000 


7.79 


35,200,000 


December, 






841,000,000 


27,100,000 


18,900,000 


45,300,000 


11.38 


50,000,000 


Total, 


11,896,400,000 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


Average, 






- 


32,600,000 


23,700,000 


52,000,000 


8.35 


43,600,000 



106 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



Average Cost per Million Foot-gallons for Pumping at the Charlestown Station. 

Volume (11,896.4 Million Gallons) X Lift (8.35 Feet) = 99,334.9 Million Foot-gallons. 



Items. 




Cost per 
Million Foot- 
gallons. 



Labor, ...... 

Coal, 

Oil, . 

Waste, ...... 

Water, 

Packing, 

Miscellaneous supplies and renewals, 

Totals 

Labor at screens, .... 



$13,961 89 

5,086 98 

131 62 

92 57 

741 60 

64 92 

971 41 



$21,050 99 



. 14055 
.05121 
.00133 
.00093 
.00747 
.00065 
.00978 



.21192 
.03260 



Aleivife Brook Pumping Station. 

The plant at this station consists of two 9-inch Andrew r s com- 
mercial centrifugal pumps, direct connected by horizontal shafts to 
compound marine engines, together with a pump and engine added 
later. The latter consists of a specially designed engine of the 
vertical cross-compound type, having between the cylinders a cen- 
trifugal pump rotating on a horizontal axis. 

Contract capacity of the two original pumps: 4,500,000 gallons each, with 13- 
foot lift. 

Contract capacity of new pump: 13,000,000 gallons, with 13-foot lift. 

Average duty for the year: 17,100,000 foot-pounds. 

Average quantity raised each day: 3,506,000 gallons. 

Force employed: 3 engineers, 1 relief engineer, 3 screenmen and 1 relief screen- 
man. 

Coal used: New River, costing from $4.88 to $5.13 per gross ton. 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



107 



Table of Approximate Quantities, Lifts and Duties at the Alewife Brook Pump- 
ing Station of the North Metropolitan System. 



Months. 


Total 
Pumpage 
(Gallons). 


Average 
Per Day 
(Gallons). 


Minimum 

Day 
(Gallons). 


Maximum 

Day 
(Gallons). 


Average 

Lift 
(Feet). 


Average 

Duty (ft.-lbs. 

per 100 lbs. 

Coal). 


1914 

January, . 




117,021,000 


3,775,000 


3,079,000 


6,271,000 


12.92 


18,000,000 


February, 






122,646,000 


4,380,000 


3,766,000 


5,364,000 


12.75 


19,000,000 


March, 






173,784,000 


5,606,000 


4,318,000 


9,453,000 


12.86 


20,500,000 


April, 






197,224,000 


6,574,000 


5,106,000 


8,347,000 


12.90 


22,400,000 


May, 






176,717,000 


5,701,000 


3,478,000 


7,462,000 


12.85 


21,100,000 


June, 






87,183,000 


2*906,000 


2,288,000 


4,027,000 


12.81 


16,700,000 


July, 






76,790,000 


2,477,000 


2,036,000 


4,554,000 


12.95 


15,600,000 


August, . 






67,043,000 


2,163,000 


1,784,000 


3,862,000 


12.88 


13,800,000 


September, 






60,069,000 


2,002,000 


1,784,000 


2,288,000 


12.97 


14,000,000 


October, . 






63,089,000 


2,035,000 


1,826,000 


3,718,000 


12.95 


14,800,000 


November, 






61,891,000 


2,063,000 


1,742,000 


3,718,000 


12.93 


14,000,000 


December, 






74,115,000 


2,391,000 


1,952,000 


4,677,000 


12.95 


15,100,000 


Total, 


1,277,572,000 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


Average, 






- 


3,506,000 


2,763,000 


5,312,000 


12.89 


17,100,000 



Average Cost per Million Foot-gallons for Pumping at the Alewife Brook Station. 

Volume (1,277.572 Million Gallons) X Lift (12.89 Feet) = 16,467.9 Million Foot-gallons. 



Items. 


Cost. 


Cost per 
Million Foot- 
gallons. 


Labor, ............. 


$6,678 54 


$0.40555 


Coal, . . . . •. .■ . 












2,074 77 


.12599 


Oil, 












120 76 


.00733 


Waste, 












123 97 


.00753 


Water, ........ 












209 16 


.01271 


Packing, ........ 












30 31 


.00184 


Miscellaneous supplies and renewals, 












229 97 


.01396 


Totals, 


$9,467 48 


$0.57491 


Labor at screens, oiling and miscellaneous services, 










- 


.11370 



108 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



South Metropolitan System. 
Ward Street Pumping Station. 

At this station are two vertical, triple-expansion pumping engines, 
of the Allis-Chalmers type, operating reciprocating pumps, the 
plungers of which are 48 inches in diameter with a 60-inch stroke. 

Contract capacity of 2 pumps: 50,000,000 gallons each, with 45-foot lift. 

Average duty for the year: 79,800,000 foot-pounds. 

Average quantity raised each day: 26,718,000 gallons. 

Force employed: 4 engineers, 1 relief engineer, 4 firemen, 5 oilers, 4 assistant 

engineers, 1 machinist and 1 laborer. 
Coal used: New River and Sterling, costing from $4.66 to $5.15 per gross ton. 
Material intercepted at screens during the year, 1,213 cubic yards. 



Table of Approximate Quantities, Lifts and Duties at the Ward Street Pumping 
Station of the South Metropolitan System. 



Months. 


Total 
Pumpage 
(Gallons). 


Average 
per Day 

(Gallons). 


Minimum 
Day 

(Gallons). 


Maximum 
Day 

(Gallons). 


Average 

Lift 
(Feet). 


Average 

Duty (ft.-lbs. 

per 100 lbs. 

Coal). 


1914 

January, . 




866,904,000 


27,966,000 


23,570,000 


45,854,000 


41.55 


89,000,000 


February, 




811,156,000 


28,970,000 


23,575,000 


34,308,000 


42.45 


94,700,000 


% 
March, 




1,127,437,000 


36,366,000 


28,033,000 


59,358,000 


42.06 


92,700,000 


April, 




1,205,640,000 


40,188,000 


34,273,000 


56,430,000 


41.96 


92,300,000 


May, 




1,158,814,000 


37,381,000 


25,801,000 


50,798,000 


42.42 


88,300,000 


June, 




739,490,000 


24,650,000 


20,748,000 


28,848,000 


41.70 


77,800,000 


July, 




683,907,000 


22,062,000 


19,300,000 


33,703,000 


41.17 


76,700,000 


August, . 




652,307,000 


21,062,000 


17,513,000 


32,350,000 


40.90 


74,200,000 


September, 




613,448,000 


20,448,000 


18,078,000 


22,307,000 


40.77 


73,300,000 


October, . 




635,945,000 


20,514,000 


17,508,000 


31,703,000 


40.69 


68,900,000 


November, 




603,261,000 


20,109,000 


16,563,000 


31,933,000 


40.69 


66,500,000 


December, 




648,014,000 


20,905,000 


17,020,000 


30,781,000 


40.80 


63,500,000 


Total, 


9,746,323,000 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


Average, 




- 


26,718,000 


21,832,000 


38,198,000 


41.43 


79,800,000 



Records from plunger displacement. 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



109 



Average Cost per Million Foot-gallons for Pumping at the Ward Street Station. 

Volume (9,746.3 Million Gallons) X Lift (41.43 Feet) = 403,789.2 Million Foot-gallons. 



Items. 




Cost per 
Million Foot- 
gallons. 



Labor, ...... 

Coal, ........ 

Oil, 

Waste 

Water 

Packing, 

Miscellaneous supplies and renewals, 

Totals 

Labor at screens, .... 



§17,708 08 

9,199 38 

212 85 

39 09 

1,533 60 

257 41 

3,705 57 



52,655 98 



.04385 
.02278 
.00053 
.00009 
.00380 
.00064 
.00918 



.08087 
.00967 



Quincy Pumping Station. 

At this station are two compound condensing Deane pumping 
engines and one Lawrence centrifugal pump driven by a Sturtevant 
ccmipound condensing engine. 

Contract capacity of 3 pumps: Deane, 3,000,000 gallons; Deane, 5,000,000 
gallons; Lawrence centrifugal, 10,000,000 gallons. 

Average duty for the year: 28,410,000 foot-pounds. 

Average quantity raised each day: 3,993,000 gallons. 

Force employed: 3 engineers, 1 relief engineer, 3 screenmen and 1 relief screen- 
man. 

Coal used: Bituminous, costing from $4.64 to $5.04 per gross ton. 

Materials intercepted at screen during the year, 215.3 cubic yards. 



110 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



Table of Approximate Quantities, Lifts and Duties at the Quincy Pumping Station 

of the South Metropolitan System. 



Months. 


Total 
Pumpage 
(Gallons). 


Average 
per Day 
(Gallons). 


Minimum 

Day 
(Gallons). 


Maximum 

Day 
(Gallons). 


Average 
Lift 

(Feet.) 


Average 

Duty (ft.-lbs. 

per 100 lbs. 

Coal). 


1914 

January, . 




130,085,000 


4,196,000 


3,487,000 


4,766,000 


2,1.52 


30,400,000 


February, 






127,803,000 


4,564,000 


3,899,000 


5,558,000 


22.53 


27,500,000 


March, 






183,745,000 


5,927,000 


4,654,000 


10,546,000 


23.92 


29,100,000 


April, 






187,618,000 


6,254,000 


5,456,000 


8,204,000 


26.74 


30,200,000 


May, 






189,558,000 


6,115,000 


4,492,000 


7,442,000 


26.08 


30,300,000 


June, 






117,637,000 


3,921,000 


3,177,000 


4,760,000 


21.10 


30,500,000 


July, 






101,880,000 


3,286,000 


2,860,000 


3,795,000 


21.03 


30,500,000 


August, . 






91,572,000 


2,954,000 


2,612,000 


3,328,000 


21.35 


28,200,000 


September, 






80,950,000 


2,698,000 


2,328,000 


3,025,000 


21.15 


27,400,000 


October, . 






75,483,000 


2,435,000 


2,218,000 


2,731,000 


21.00 


24,800,000 


November, 






75,092,000 


2,503,000 


2,018,000 


2,977,000 


21.13 


25,400,000 


December, 






94,984,000 


3,064,000 


2,335,000 


3,702,000 


21.03 


26,600,000 


Total, 


1,456,407,000 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


Average, 






- 


3,993,000 


3,295,000 


5,070,000 


22.38 


28,410,000 



Average Cost per Million Foot-gallons for Pumping at the Quincy Station. 

Volume (1,456.4 Million Gallons) X Lift (22.38 Feet) = 32,594.2 Million Foot-gallons. 



Items. 


Cost. 


Cost per 

Million Fpot- 

gallons. 


Labor, 




$6,518 27 


$0.19998 


Coal, 




2,110 44 


.06476 


Oil, . 




28 18 


.00086 


Waste, 




36 09 


.00111 


Water, 





212 23 


.00651 


Packing, . 




29 74 


.00091 


Miscellaneous 


supplies and renewals, . . . 


527 54 


.01618 


Totals, 


$9,462 49 


$0.29031 


Labor at screens, oiling and miscellaneous services, .... 


- 


.04963 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. Ill 

Nut Island Screen-house. 

The plant at this house includes two sets of screens in duplicate 
actuated by small reversing engines of the Fitchburg type. Two 
vertical Deane boilers, 80 horse-power each, operate the engines, pro- 
vide heat and light for the house, burn materials intercepted at the 
screens, and furnish power for the Quincy sewage lifting station. 

Average daily quantity of sewage passing screens, 52,600,000 gallons. 
Total materials intercepted at screens, 1,155.35 cubic yards. 
Materials intercepted per million gallons of sewage discharged, 1.61 cubic feet. 
Force employed: 3 engineers, 1 relief engineer, 3 screenmen and 1 relief screen- 
man. 
Coal used: Sterling-Elm ora, costing from $4.14 to $4.75 per gross ton. 

Quincy Sewage Lifting Station. 

At this station are two 6-inch submerged Lawrence centrifugal 
pumps with vertical shafts actuated by two Sturtevant direct-current 
motors. 

The labor and electric energy for this station are supplied from 
the Nut Island screen-house and as used at present it does not mate- 
rially increase the amount of coal used at the latter station. The 
effluent is largely ground water. 

Average daily amount pumped, 84,500 gallons. 
Average lift, 16.16 feet. 



112 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



Coal delivered in the Bins of the Sewerage Works Pumping Stations during the Year. 



, 


Gross Tons, Bituminous Coal. 






m 

a 

'ft 

S 

3 

Ph 

a . 

rn O 

Q 


a 
'a 
S 

3 

PL| 

a 

o 

h- 3 A 
m G 
O O 

*>$ 

ejCO 


M 

s 
"ft 

a 

3 
Ph 

a 
* . 

to O 

- ^43 

o 


i 

ft 

a 

3 

2 rt 
8.2 

n-S 

<£co 
® 9 


M 

a 
'a 

a 

3 
Ph 
-ij 

o ■ 
£ a 
CO .2 

ScQ 


i 

o3 
GQ 
M 

a 
'S. 

a 

3 
Ph 
>> . 

.3.2 

3°hj 


i 

a 

a> 
u 
o 

m 

T3 

3 

M 8 

3 

HJ O 

3,3 




o 
H 

to 
ai 

O 

u 

a 

u 

o 

a 
a 
.2 

P- 


Gorman-Leonard Coal Company 


799 


- 


- 




- 


- 


- 


$3 94 


Metropolitan Coal Company, 


688 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


4 63 


Metropolitan Coal Company, 


678 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


4 64 


Gorman-Leonard Coal Company 


- 


425.90 


- 




- 


- 


- 


3 89 


Gorman-Leonard Coal Company 


- 


584.07 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


3 94 


Gorman-Leonard Coal Company 


- 


844.00 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


3 98 


Metropolitan Coal Company, 


- 


363.00 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


4 35 


Metropolitan Coal Company, 


- 


371.00 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


4 37 


Metropolitan Coal Company, 


- 


372.00 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


4 50 


Metropolitan Coal Company, 


- 


364.00 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


4 54 


Gorman-Leonard Coal Company 


- 


- 


167 


- 


- 


- 


- 


4 05 


Metropolitan Coal Company, 


- 


- 


246 


- 


- 


- 


- 


4 41 


Metropolitan Coal Company, 


- 


- 


300 


- 


- 


- 


- 


4 45 


Metropolitan Coal Company, 


- 


- 


295 


- 


- 


- 


- 


4 52 


Locke Coal Company, 


- 


- 


- 


44.660 


- 


- 


- 


4 86 


Locke Coal Company, 


- 


- 


- 


196.963 


- 


- 


- 


4 92 


Locke Coal Company, 


- 


- 


- 


41.380 


- 


- 


- 


5 02 


Locke Coal Company, 


- 


- 


- 


8.013 


- 


- 


- 


5 03 


Locke Coal Company. 


- 


- 


- 


79.326 


- 


- 


- 


5 13 


Gorman-Leonard Coal Company 


- 


- 


- 


- 


20.796 


- 


- 


3 25 


Gorman-Leonard Coal Company 


- 


- 


- 


- 


33.310 


- 


- 


4 66 


Gorman-Leonard Coal Company 


, 


- 


- 


- 


249.563 


- 


- 


4 80 


Gorman-Leonard Coal Company 


, 


- 


- 


- 


341.441 


- 


- 


4 83 


Metropolitan Coal Company, 


- 


- 


- 


- 


250.680 


- 


- 


4 93 


Metropolitan Coal Company, 


- 


- 


- 


- 


302.308 


- 


- 


4 98 


Metropolitan Coal Company, 


- 


- 


- 


- 


293.477 


- 


- 


5 00 


Metropolitan Coal Company, 




- 


- 


- 


92.710 


- 


- 


- 5 03 


Metropolitan Coal Company, 


- 


- 


- 


- 


107.602 


- 


- 


5 04 


Metropolitan Coal Company, 


- 


- 


- 


- 


268.602 


- 


- 


5 15 


Frost Coal Company, . 


. 


- 


- 


- 


- 


49.178 


- 


4 64 


Frost Coal Company, . 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


49.400 


- 


4 69 


Frost Coal Company, . 


. 


- 


- 


- 


- 


50.714 


- 


4 81 



Includes adjustments for quality. 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



113 



Coal delivered in the Bins of the Sewerage Works Pumping Stations during the 

Year — Concluded. 





Gross Tons, Bituminous Coal. 






bO 

a 
'a 

a 

Ph 

a . 

03 fl 
*o3 O 

U «3 

Q 


bO 

a 
'p. 

a 

Ph 

a 
o 

to C 
O O 

pq*43 
*>$ 

%% 


bO 

a 
'S. 

a 

Ph 
a 
& . 

S a 

m O 

o 


ft 

a 

Ph 
^ . 

2.2 

n-S 

©.S 

< 


a 

'a 

a 

Ph 

© 

© • 
^ G 

0Q.2 

£ ■+* 
03 02 


■ 

o3 
02 
fed 

a 
'S. 

a 

Ph 
>> . 

2 a 
S 2 

'?'£ 


i 

a 

a 

<x> 
u 
o 
W 

43 O 


a 

o 
H 

02 

ra 
O 

(4 

a 

© 
ft 

© 
o 

'(-I 

Ph 


Frost Coal Company, . 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


48.455 


- 


$4 82 


Frost Coal Company, . 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


15.736 


- 


4 88 


Frost Coal Company, . 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


33.370 


- 


4 89 


Frost Coal Company, . 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


61.770 


- 


4 92 


Frost Coal Company, ... 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


51.446 


- 


5 00 


Frost Coal Company, . 


- 




- 


- 


- 


59.250 


- 


5 04 


Gorman-Leonard Coal Company, 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


117.133 


4 14 


Gorman-Leonard Coal Company, 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


162.890 


4 35 


Metropolitan Coal Company, 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


75.000 


4 75 


Total gross tons, 


2,165 


3,323.97 


1,008 


370.342 


1,960.489 


419.319 


355.023 


- 


Average price per gross ton, . 


U 37 


$4 15 


$4 39 


$4 97 


$4 93 


$4 86 


$4 37 


- 



Includes adjustments for quality. 



Metropolitan Sewerage Outfalls. 

The Deer Island outfall has been in continuous operation since 
May, 1895. 

The 60-inch outfall pipes on the South Metropolitan System have 
been in operation since October, 1904. 

These outfalls are in good condition and free from deposit. Dur- 
ing the year the average flow through the North Metropolitan out- 
fall at Deer Island has been 58,700,000 gallons of sewage per 24 
hours, with a maximum rate of 149,700,000 gallons on March 2, 
1914. The amount of sewage discharged in the North Metropolitan 
District averaged 112 gallons per day for each person, taking the 
estimated population of the district contributing sewage. If the 
sewers in this district were restricted to the admission of sewage 
proper only and all local sewers were separate sewers, this per cap- 
ita amount would be considerably decreased. 

In the South Metropolitan district an average of 52,600,000 gal- 
lons of sewage has passed daily through the screens at the Nut Island 



114 METROPOLITAN WATER BOARD. [P. D. No. 57. 

screen-house, and has been discharged from the outfalls into the 
outer harbor. The maximum rate of discharge per day, which oc- 
curred during a heavy storm on March 1, 1914, was 165,000,000 
gallons. The discharge of sewage through these outfalls represents 
the amount of sewage contributed in the South Metropolitan System, 
which was at the rate of 191 gallons per day per person of the 
estimated number contributing sewage in the District. 

The daily discharge of sewage per capita is considerably larger in 
the South Metropolitan District than it is in the North Metropolitan 
District, because, owing to the large size of the High-level sewer, 
more storm water is admitted at periods of heavy rainfall. 

Material Intercepted at the Screens. 

The material intercepted at the screens at the North Metropolitan 
Sewerage stations, consisting of rags, paper and other floating ma- 
terials, has during the year amounted to 3,057.8 cubic yards. This 
is equivalent to 3.86 cubic feet for each million gallons of sewage 
pumped at Deer Island. 

The material intercepted at the screens at the South Metropolitan 
Sewerage stations has amounted to 2,583.94 cubic yards, equal to 
3.63 cubic feet per million gallons of sewage delivered at the outfall 
works at Nut Island. 

Studies of sewage flows in the Metropolitan sewers and siphons 
indicate that they are free from deposit. 

Respectfully submitted, 



Boston, January 1, 1915. 



FREDERICK D. SMITH, 

Engineer of Sewerage Works. 



APPENDIX. 



116 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



Appendix No. 1 . 



Contracts made and pending 

[Note. — The details of contracts made before 



1. 

Number 

of 
Contract. 



2. 

WORK. 



3522 



3532 



354 



3552 



356 ; 



357 



358 2 



359 



324 tons cast-iron water pipe; 
270 tons 42-inch, 54 tons 36- 
inch pipe; and 25 tons 
special castings. 

2 steel casings for shafts of 
water pipe tunnel under 
Chelsea Creek. 

Constructing water pipe tun- 
nel under Chelsea Creek, 
between East Boston and 
Chelsea. :. 



1 ,050 tons cast iron water pipe ; 
530 tons 24-inch, 480 tons 20- 
inch, 30 tons 12-inch, 10 tons 
8-inch pipe; and 25 tons 
special castings. 

1,050 tons 24-inch cast-iron 
water pipe, and 25 tons 
special castings. 

Steel tank or reservoir on 
Bellevue Hill. 



Water valves; 5 24-inch, 6 20- 
inch and 2 12-inch screw lift 
valves. 

Laying 24-inch water pipes in 
Boston, Milton and Quincy. 



Num- 
ber of 
Bids. 



15 



Amount of Bid. 



4. 

Next to 
Lowest. 



$9,141 80 

1,263 00 
62,695 00 



23,247 50 

22,985 00 

19,540 00 

3,130 00 

16,225 00 



5. 

Lowest. 



$8,470 60i 

1,262 00 1 
60,300 00 1 



23,195 00 » 



22,775 00 1 



19,397 00 1 



2,873 OQi 



15,208 2Qi 



Contractor. 



United States Cast 
Iron Pipe & Foundry 
Co., Philadelphia, 
Pa. 

Roberts Iron Works 
Co., Cambridge, 

Mass. 

Coleman Brothers, 
Chelsea, Mass. 



Warren Foundry & Ma- 
chine Co., Phillips- 
burg, N. J. 



Warren Foundry & Ma- 
chine Co., Phillips- 
burg, N. J. 

Walsh's H o 1 y o k e 
Steam Boiler Works, 
Holyoke, Mass. 

Coffin Valve Co., Bos- 
ton. 



John J. Evans, Law- 
rence, Mass. 



i Contract based upon this bid. 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



117 



Appendix No. 1 



DURING THE YEAR 1914 — ■ WATER WORKS. 

1914 have been given in previous reports.] 



Date of Con- 
tract. 



8. 

Date of 
Completion 
of Contract. 



Prices of Principal Items of Contracts 
made in 1914. 



10. 

Value of 

Work done 

Dec. 31, 

1914. 



Feb. 27, 1914 



Feb. 26, 1914 



Apr. 27, 1914 



June 23, 1914 



June 23, 1914 



Aug. 7, 1914 



July 15, 1914 



Aug. 4, 1914 



Oct. 3, 1914 



May 25, 1914 



Nov. 6, 1914 



Nov. 6, 1914 



Nov. 18, 1914 



For pipes, $21.90 per ton of 2,000 pounds; for special 
castings, $55 per ton of 2,000 pounds. 



For whole work, $1,262. 



For spruce piles driven and cut off, $0.30 per lin. ft.; 
for oak piles driven and cut off, $0.60 per lin. ft.; 
for long leaf yellow pine lumber in place for bulk- 
head, shaft and fender guards and pipe line founda- 
tions, $60 per M. feet B. M. ; for long leaf yellow pine 
lumber in place for walks and fences, $75 per M. 
feet B. M. ; for constructing tunnel, $78 per lin. ft. ; 
for laying 36-inch and 24-inch cast-iron water pipe, 
$1.50 per lin. ft. ; for removing existing 24-inch cast- 
iron water pipe, $1 per lin. ft.; for earth filling on 
land of Commonwealth, $0.40 per cu. yd.; for rock 
excavation, $10 per cu. yd. 



For pipes, 
castings, 



For pipes, 
castings, 



.90 per ton of 2,000 pounds; for special 
) per ton of 2,000 pounds. 



'.50 per ton of 2,000 pounds; for special 
) per ton of 2,000 pounds. 



For whole work, $19,397. 



For 24-inch screw lift valves, $265 each; for 20-inch 
screw lift valves, $223 each; for 12-inch screw lift 
valves, $105 each. 

For laying 24-inch cast-iron pipe, $1.05 per lin. ft.; 
for rock excavation above regular grade of bottom 
of trench, $4.90 per cu. yd.; for rock excavation 
below grade, $5.50 per cu. yd. ; for earth excavation 
below grade, $0.75 per cu. yd.; for chambers for 24- 
inch valves, $60 per chamber; for chambers for 16- 
inch and smaller valves, $55 per chamber; for con- 
crete masonry, $6 per cu. yd. 



$8,447 14 

1,262 00 
60,280 00 



23,481 34 

23,540 00 

17,460 00 

2,873 00 

12,780 00 



2 Contract completed. 



118 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



Contracts made and pending during 



10 



11 



12 



13 



14 



15 



16 



17 



18 



19 



Number 

of 
Contract. 



WORK. 



Num- 
ber of 
Bids. 



360 2 



361 2 



362 



363 



31-M 2 



32-M 2 



33-M 2 



34-M 2 



35-M 



36-M 



37-M 



Laying 20-inch water pipes in 
Boston. 



Constructing foundation for 
reservoir on Bellevue Hill. 



3,930 tons 60-inch cast-iron 
water pipe; 120 tons special 
castings. 

2,800 tons 60-inch cast-iron 
water pipe; 100 tons special 
castings. 



450 tons C. C. B. New River 
coal for Arlington pumping 
station. 

750 tons Georges Creek Cum- 
berland or New River coal for 
Spot Pond pumping station. 

5,000 tons Beaver Run coal for 
Chestnut Hill pumping sta- 
tions; 300 tons Beaver Run 
coal for Hyde Park pumping 
station, and 85 tons Beaver 
Run coal for Pegan pumping 
station. 



Fuel economizer and appurte- 
nances for Chestnut Hill 
pumping station No. 1. 

400 tons C. C. B. New River 
coal for Arlington pumping 
station. 

700 tons C. C. B. New River 
coal for Spot Pond pumping 
station. 

4,000 tons Beaver Run coal for 
Chestnut Hill pumping sta- 
tions, and 260 tons Sterling 
coal for Hyde Park pumping 
station. 



13 



21 



Chest- 
nut 
Hill 
sta- 
tions, 

3. 
Hyde 
Park 
sta- 
tion, 

4. 
Pegan 
sta- 
tion, 
3. 



Chest- 
nut 
Hill 
sta- 
tions, 

5. 
Hyde 
Park 
sta- 
tion, 
3. 



Amount of Bid. 



Next to 
Lowest. 



,007 00 > 



6,155 00 



87,547 50 



1.021 per 
ton. 



4.17 1 per 
ton. 



$4.24 1 per 
ton 



$1,644 00 



1.28 * per 
ton. 



$5.30 per 
ton. 



53.94 per 
ton. 



!4.33 per 
ton. 



5. 

Lowest. 



$4,820 22 



5,874 00 1 
82,908 00 1 



4.38 1 per 
ton. 



5.30 1 per 
ton. 



3.97 per 

ton. 



1.12 per 
ton. 



1.19 per 

ton. 



1,480 OQi 



$4.20 per 
ton. 



5.10 ! per 

ton. 



per 



ton. 



4.101 per 
ton. 



Contractor. 



Charles R. Gow Co., 
West Roxbury, Mass. 



John E. Palmer, Bos- 
ton. 



United States Cast 
Iron Pipe & Foundry 
Co., Philadelphia, 
Pa. 

United States Cast 
Iron Pipe & Foundry 
Co., Philadelphia, 
Pa. 

Bader Coal Co., Bos- 
ton. 



Locke Coal Co., Mai- 
den. 



Gorman-Leonard Coal 
Co., Worcester. 



B. F. Sturtevant Co. 
Boston. 



Bader Coal Co., Bos- 
ton. 



Bader Coal Co., Bos- 
ton. 



Gorman-Leonard Coal 
Co., Worcester. 



Contract based upon this bid. 



2 Contract completed. 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



119 



the Year 1914 — Water Works — Continued. 



Date of Con- 
tract. 



8. 

Date of 
Completion 
of Contract. 



Prices of Principal Items of Contracts 
made in 1914. 



10. 

Value of 

Work done 

Dec. 31, 

1914. 



Aug. 7, 1914 



Aug. 4, 1914 



Nov. 25, 1914 



Nov. 28, 1914 



June 25, 1913 



June 25, 1913 



July 1, 1913 



Mar. 16, 1914 

June 25, 1914 

June 25, 1914 

June 25, 1914 



Nov. 25, 1914 



Oct. 6, 1914 



May 23, 1914 



June 1, 1914 



Aug. 10, 1914 



June 30, 1914 



For laying 20-inch cast-iron pipe, 10.90 per lin. ft.; 
for rock excavation above regular grade of bottom 
of trench, $3 per cu. yd. ; for rock excavation below 
grade, $6 per cu. yd.; for earth excavation below 
grade, $1 per cu. yd.; for chambers for 20-inch 
valves, $75 per chamber; for chambers for 12-inch 
and smaller valves, $40 per chamber; for concrete 
masonry, $7 per cubic yd. 

For earth excavation, $0.48 per cu. yd.; for rock ex- 
cavation, $4 per cu. yd.; for concrete masonry, 
$6.70 per cu. yd. 



For pipes, ! 
castings, 



.60 per ton of 2,000 pounds; for special 
! per ton of 2,000 pounds. 



For pipes, $19.60 per ton of 2,000 pounds; for special 
castings, $49 per ton of 2,000 pounds. 



For whole work, $1,830, less allowance of $350 for old 
economizer. 



1.28 per ton of 2,240 pounds delivered on cars at the 
Arlington station. 



$5.10 per ton of 2,240 pounds delivered in bins at the 
Spot Pond station. 



1.02 per ton of 2,240 pounds delivered on cars at the 
Chestnut Hill stations; $4.10 per ton of 2,240 pounds 
delivered on cars at the Hyde Park station. 



23 9 



6,382 28 
12,350 00 



2,030 30 

3,872 67 

21,691 59 



1.4S0 00 



1,099 53 



2,481 03 



9,136 05 



10 



11 



12 



13 



14 



15 



16 



17 



18 



19 



3 Contractor for No. 362 agreed to accept prices bid under that contract for the additional quantities 
included in No. 363. 



120 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



Contracts made and pending during 





1. 

Number 

of 
Contract. 


2. 

WORK. 


3. 

Num- 
ber of 
Bids. 


Amount of Bid. 


6. 




4. 

Next to 

Lowest. 


5. 

Lowest. 


Contractor. 


20 
21 

22 
23 
24 


38-M2 
39-M 

Special 2 
Order. 

Special 2 
Order. 

Special 2 
Order. 


Repaying 24-inch water pipe 
trench in Broadway, Chel- 
sea. 

Sale and purchase of electric 
energy to be developed at 
the Sudbury Dam. 

Pelton water wheel for ma- 
chine shop at Chestnut Hill 
pumping station. 

1 20-inch Venturi meter tube; 
1 Type M register indicator 
recorder. 

1 16-inch Venturi meter tube; 
1 Type M register indicator 
recorder. 


5 

2 

-6 
-6 
_6 


$1.65 per 
sq. yd. 

$5,505 p er 

M. 

kilowatt 

hours. 

_6 
_6 
_6 


$1.60i per 
sq. yd. 

$6.25i,4 

per M. 

kilowatt 

hours. 

_6 
_6 
_6 


C. W. Dolloff & Co., 
Boston. 

Edison Electric Illu- 
minating Co., Bos- 
ton. 

Pelton Water Wheel 
Co., New York. 

Builders Iron Foundry, 
Providence, R. I. 

Builders Iron Foundry, 
Providence, R. I. 



1 Contract based upon this bid. 



2 Contract completed. 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



121 



the Year 1914 — Water Works — Continued. 



7. 


8. 


9. 


10. 




Date of Con- 
tract. 


Date of 
Completion 
of Contract. 


Prices of Principal Items of Contracts 
made in 1914. 


Value of 

Work done 

Dec. 31, 

1914. 




Sept. 2, 1914 


Oct. 12, 1914 


For taking up temporary pavement and repaying 
with granite blocks (furnished by the Common- 
wealth) on a concrete base, $1.60 per square yard. 


$1,319 68 


20 


Dec. 21, 1914 


— 


Estimated amount of electric energy available per 
year, 3,000,000 kilowatt hours. 


- 


21 


Dec. 4, 1913 


May 1, 1914 


- 


350 00 


22 


Mar. 4, 1914 


Apr. 30, 1914 


For meter tube and indicator recorder, $765, 


765 00 


23 


Aug. 13, 1914 


Sept. 25, 1914 


For meter tube and indicator recorder, $655, 


655 00 


24 








$220,634 96 





4 Highest bid. 5 Next to highest bid. 6 Competitive bids were not received. 



122 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



Contracts made and pending during the Year 1914 — Water Works 

Concluded. 

Summary of Contracts. 1 



Value of 

Work done Dec. 

31, 1914. 



Distribution Department, 12 contracts, . . . . . . . . 

346 contracts completed from 1896 to 1913, inclusive, ...... 

Deduct for work done on 11 Sudbury Reservoir contracts by the city of Boston, 
Total of 369 contracts, 



$175,754 05 
16,875,638 35 



$17,051,392 40 
512,000 00 



$16,539,392 40 



1 In this summary contracts charged to maintenance are excluded 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



123 



O 
X 









© 



Oh 



Q 




£ 


■w 


S 


e 


Ph 




Ph 




<J 





03 






o 

H 

M 

En 





^ 


o 


-* 


OJ 


o 


CO 


Ci 


CM 


CD 


O 


■* 


o 


>* 




•sp^ox 


to 


■>* 


o 


i-H 


CO 


CO 


CM 


C55 


CO 


OS 




OS 


to 


i^ 


CO 


CM 


t^ 


00 


!>• 


tO 


CO 


^H 


to 


oo 


t^ 


t^ 


CO 


t^ 




CO 


-* 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


TJH 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 




OO 


CO 


o 


to 


*# 


co 


** 


C5 


00 


00 


t^ 


to 


OS 


CO 


•jaqraaoaQ 


CO 


o 


o 


00 


CO 


CO 


CM 


to 


CO 


C5 


CO 


CO 


oo 


<* 




CO 


*# 


■* 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 




"* 


CO 


a> 


CO 


CD 


Tfl 


00 


CO 


to 


•># 


oo 


CO 


t~ 


CO 


■laqraaAO^j 


CM 


■<* 


CO 


t^ 


lO 


-*l 


CO 


r-» 


"* 


OS 


CD 


t^ 


a> 


tO 




CO 


CO 


CM 


CM 


CM 


CM 


CM 


CM 


CM 


CM 


CM 


CM 


CM 


CM 




CO 


CO 


CM 


OS 


CM 


CD 


o 


O 


C3i 


_ 


CM 


»— < 


00 


o 


•jaqo^oo 


to 


CS 


CO 




CD 


tO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


t^ 


to 


t>. 


O0 


CD 






Oi 


tO 


CO 


** 


00 


CO 


OS 


r>- 


to 


TH 


-<*< 


to 


OS 


•jaquia^dog 


1-1 


1-1 


rH 


1-1 


CM 


, " H 


CO 


CO 


<M 


CO 


CM 


CM 


1-1 


CM 




o 


o 


o 


o 


O 


o 


o 


o 


O 


o 


o 


o 


o 


O 




C5 


o 


OS 


■* 


CO 


o 


o 


o 


CM 


CO 


_ 


OS 


o 


CM 


•^snSny 


OS 


CO 


to 




CO 


»o 


o 


OS 


CD 


00 


CM 


o 


to 


00 


ec 


"0 


T* 


■»* 


CO 


CO 


"* 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


■<* 


CO 




00 


CM 


o 


CO 


CO 


CO 


OS 


■<* 


t^ 


t>. 


CO 


00 


CM 


"# 


•A\a£ 


to 


o 


00 


CM 


■<* 


t>. 


OS 


to 


i—l 


t^ 


OS 


■* 


OS 


rfl 


"«*< 


<# 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CM 


CM 


■* 


CO 


CM 


CM 


CO 


CO 


CO 




CO 


o 


^ 


CO 


■<*! 


CM 


CO 


CO 


o 


CO 


CO 


CM 


o 


o 


•aunf 


o 


CM 


Ci 


00 


CO 


o 


CO 


o 


to 


c-» 


CM 


Ol 


o 


05 


CM 


CM 


y— 1 


* —l 


1-1 


CM 


.— ) 


CM 


1 ™ 1 


T_l 


CM 


1-1 


CM 


t-H 




cm 


O 


t^ 


CO 


o 


CM 


o 


<— 1 


1— 1 


t^ 


■* 


CO 




00 


•ift3J\[ 


»o 


to 


t~ 


CM 


CO 


00 


rl 


CD 


I>. 


r- 


CO 


C5 


o 


o 




c<> 


CO 


CM 


CO 


CM 


CM 


CO 


CO 


CM 


CM 


CM 


CM 


CO 


CO 




o 


CO 


tO 


CM 


00 


CM 


t^ 


tO 


CO 


o> 


CM 


■O 




o 


•judy 


00 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


00 


00 


00 


OS 


1-1 


to 


CM 


OS 


T_l 


*# 


tO 


■>* 


TtH 


"* 


■* 


■<* 


to 


■<* 


CO 


CO 


tO 


■* 


to 




CO 


t« 


tO 


I>- 


"* 


oo 


to 


CO 


^ 


CM 


TJH 


co 


CO 


t^ 


•qojBj\[ 


rJH 


t-- 


■"# 


CO 


CO 


CO 


•<*< 


>-l 


■* 


•* 


CD 


M< 


CO 


to 


CO 


■«# 


■* 


«* 


<* 


-*f 


"# 


to 


<* 


-c* 


"* 


TtH 


-<*< 


->* 




o 


tO 


_, 


CO 


CO 


o 


CD 


to 


T— 1 


<* 


t^. 


O 


00 


t^ 


•Aj'eruqoj 


■* 


o 


tO 


CO 


1—1 


00 


O 


CM 


1—1 


CO 


t>. 


OO 


to 


o 


CO 


T* 


CO 


CO 


"* 


CO 


-* 


■<* 


-* 


•* 


CO 


CO 


CO 


■<* 




CO 


T— 1 


o 


to 


CO 


C5 


CO 


t--. 


CO 


CO 


CD 


CM 


o 


>o 


•AjBnu'Bf 


"1 


CD 


o 


CO 


00 


CO 


to 


CM 


to 


o 


CO 


CD 


•**< 


CO 




CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


-"*! 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 




























o 






























Xi 
































43 


9 


























-p 
cj 


u 

■p 

c3 


<< 












- 








H 

'o 






4) 




P-, 










a 


„. 


a 






u 













a 








Q 


3 

C3 

43 


Q 


O 


of 


■ u> 




"3 


43 
u 


5 
3 




o 


a 
o 


bo 


a 
o 


>> 


a 


Tl 


^ 


C3 

3 


^ 




o 


CO 




S 








3 






















u 

't-l 


u 

cfi 


02 


o 


co 


3 


3 

to 


t3 

(h 

o 
O 


J3 
o 
O 

O 


a 
o 

Ph 


fafl 

C3 
M 

> 


M 
c3 
M 
O 


M 
S 

(-< 
cu 

'v* 






















1^ 




<J 


<; 


*TJ 






paqeieq/BAA 


•poqsjo^e^\ 


M 


a> 
43 


+-> 



a 

CO 






^osnqoB^\ 




Ajnqpni 


3 


Hi 


u 









124 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



Table No. 2. — Rainfall in Inches at Jefferson, Mass., in 191J/.. 



Day of Month. 


03 

a 
a 
>-> 


>> 

5- 


o 


't-i 

ft 
< 




1-5 


>> 
H 

1-3 


< 


u 



B 

ft 


u 
<a 

O 
O 


B 

> 



S-' 

B 

CD 
O 

Q 


1, . . 






- 


- 


2.18 3 


0.46 


- 


- 


2 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


2, 










- 


- 




2 


- 


- 


1.05 


- 


- 


- 


0.21 


0.17 


3, 










2 


- 


0.24 


0.14i 


- 


2 


- 


2 


- 


- 


- 


- 


.4, 










0.32 


- 


- 


- 


- 


0.54 


- 


2 


- 


- 


- 


- 


5, 
6, 

7, 










- 


2 


2 


0.12i 


1.35 


- 


2 


0.06 


- 


- 


- 


- 










- 


0.423 


0.423 


2 


- 


- 


0.57 


- 


- 


- 


- 


0.783 


8, 










- 


- 


- 


1.23 s 


0.41 


- 


- 


0.14 


- 


- 


2 


- 


9, 
10, 
11, 










- 


- 


- 


- 


- ' 


- 


0.96 


- 


- 


- 


0.27 


- 










- 


- 


- 


- 


2 


- 


0.31 


0.43 


- 


- 


- 


- 


12, 










- 


- 


- 


0.09 


2 


- 


- 


0.12 


- 


- 


- 


- 


13, 










- 


- 


- 


- 


1.29 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


0.10 


2 


14, 










- 


2.28i 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


1.473 


15, 










- 


- 


- 


2 


- 


0.19 


- 


- 


- 


- 


2 


- 


16, 










2 


0.161 


- 


0.973 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


2 


1.26 


- 


17, 










0.09 1 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


0.60 


- 


1.31 


- 


- 


18, 










- 


- 


0.343 


- 


- 


- 


0.21 


0.71 


- 


- 


- 


- 


19, 










- 


0.69i 


- 


- 


- 


2 


- 


2 


'- 


0.46 


1.62 3 


0.21 


20, 










2 


- 


- 


0.40 


- 


0.54 


- 


2 


- 


- 


- 


- 


21, 










1.32i 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


0.25 


2.52 


- 


- 


- ' 


0.963 


22, 










- 


- 


0.071 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


9 


- 


23, 










- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


0.14 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


24, 










0.81 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


0.071 


25, 










- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


0.07 


- 


- 


- 


26, 










0.09 1 


- 


0.10 


2 


0.40 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


27, 










- 


- 


2 


2 


0.05 


0.75 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


28, 










- 


0.503 


1.093 


1.68 3 


- 


0.18 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


29, 










- 


- 


- 


0.27 


- 


- 


0.53 


2 


- 


0.16 


- 


0.37 


30, 










- 


- 


0.31 


- 


- 


- 


- 


0.72 


0.12 


- 


-_ 


- 


31, 










0.98 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


T 


otals 


• 


3.61 


4.05 


4.75 


5.36 


3.50 


2.20 


4.02 


5.30 


0.19 


1.93 


3.46 


4.03 



1 Snow. 



Total for the year 42.40 inches. 
2 Rainfall included in that of following day. 



3 Rain and snow. 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



125 



Table No. 3. — Rainfall in Inches at Framingham, Mass., in 191/ h 



Day of Month. 


c3 
1-3 


u 

C3 
3 
u 


o 

03 


ft 
< 


3 




>> 
3 


tn 
M 

< 


u 



a 

a 


u 
<s 







u 



a 

> 
O 


u 


a 






Q 


1, . . . 






- 


- 


1.49 


0.26 


- 


0.14 


2 


0.11 


- 


- 


- 


- 


2, . 










" 


- 


2 


2 


- 


- 


0.86 


0.02 


- 


- 


0.03 


2 


3, . 










2 


2 


0.20 


0.14 3 


- 


0.20 


- 


0.03 


- 


- 


- 


0.12 


4, . 










0.173 


0.15 


- 


- 


2 


0.07 


- 


2 


- 


- 


- 


- 


5, . 










- 


- 


- 


0.013 


2 


- 


- 


0.03 


- 


- 


- 


-r 


6, 










- 


2 


2 


2 


1.27 


- 


2 


- 


0.01 


- 


- 


- 


7, • 










- 


0.743 


0.451 


2 


- 


- 


0.60 


- 


- 


- 


0.02 


2 


8, . 










COP 


- 


- 


1.073 


0.42 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


0.13 


0.553 


9, 

10, . 

11, • 










0.01 


- 


- 


- 


0.10 


- 


0.01 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 










- 


- 


- 


0.03 


2 


- 


0.40 


2 


- 


- 


- 


- 


12, . 










- 


- 


- 


- 


2 


- 


0.06 


0.29 


- 


- 


- 


- 


13, . 










- 


2 


- 


- 


0.93 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


1.08 


14, . 










- 


1.703 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


15, 










0.13 1 


- 


- 


2 


- 


2 


0.03 


- 


- 


2 


2 


- 


16, 










2 


0.381 


- 


1.36 3 


- 


0.29 


-■ 


- 


- 


2 


0.68 


- 


17, 










0.03 1 


- 


0.11 


- 


- 


- 


- 


0.18 


- 


1.27 


- 


- 


18, 










- 


2 


0.38 s 


- 


- 


- 


0.04 


0.58 


- 


- 


- 


- 


19, 










- 


0.52i 


- 


- 


- 


0.34. 


- 


2 


- 


0.19 


2 


0.28 


20, 










2 


- 


- 


0.17 


- 


- 


- 


2 


- 


- 


1 58 3 


- 


21, 










1.25 1 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


0.33 


1.70 


■ - 


- 


- 


0.813 


22, 










- 


- 


0.05i 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


23, 










- 


- 


0.04i 


- 


- 


- 


0.09 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


24, 










0.88 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


0.04i 


25, 










- 


- 


0.05 


2 


0.02 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


26, 










0.05 1 


- 


J - 


2 


0.08 


- 


- 


- 


- 


0.09 


- 


- 


27, 










- 


- 


2 


1.64 


- 


2 


2 


- 


- 


- 


- 


0.011 


28, 










- 


0.31 


1.242 


- 


- 


2 


0.12 


- 


0.01 


- 


- 


- 


29, 










0.02 


- 


2 


2 


- 


2 


0.15 


2 


2 


2 


- 


0.47 


30, 










- 


- 


0.37 


0.14 


- 


0.98 


0.02 


0.56 


0.16 


0.01 


- 


- 


31, 










1.14 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


0.05 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


1 


"otalf 


, 


3.69 

i 


3.80 


4.38 


4.82 


2.82 


2.02 


2.76 


3.50 


0.18 


1.56 


2.44 


3.36 



1 Snow. 



Total for the year 35.33 inches. 
2 Rainfall included in that of following day. 



3 Rain and snow. 



126 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



Table No. 4. — Rainfall in Inches at Chestnut Hill Reservoir in 1914- 



Date. 



4, 
4, 
4, 
5, 
7, 



Jan. 
Jan. 
Jan. 
Jan. 
Jan. 
Jan. 15, 
Jan. 16, 
Jan. 16, 
Jan. 17, 
Jan. 20, 
Jan. 20, 
Jan. 21, 
Jan. 21, 
Jan. 24, 
Jan. 25, 
Jan. 26, 
Jan. 29, 
Jan. 31, 



Total, 



3, . 

4, . 
6, 

7, 
7, 



Feb. 
Feb. 
Feb. 
Feb. 
Feb. 
Feb. 13, 
Feb. 14, . 
Feb. 14, . 
Feb. 14, . 
Feb. 16, . 
Feb. 19, . 
Feb. 20, . 
Mar. 1, . 

Total, 



Mar. 1, 
Mar. 2, 
Mar. 3, 
Mar. 6, 
Mar. 7, 
Mar. 17, 
Mar. 18, 
Mar. 22, 
Mar. 23, 
Mar. 26, 
Mar. 27, 
Mar. 29, 
Mar. 29, 
Mar. 30, 



Total, 



Amount. 



.13 
.31 1 

.05 

.051 
.13 1 

.031 

.031 
1.071 

.071 



.06i 
.02 
1.15 



3.96 



.21 

.692 

.19 
1.541 

.27 

.061 

.341 

.741 

.30 



4.34 



Duration. 



3.40 a.m. 
9.15 A.M. 
2.05 p.m. 

4.05 a.m. 
12.10 p.m. 



9.30 p.m. to 



12.05 a.m. 
10.15 A.M. 

4.30 p.m. 
8.15 A.M. 

1.30 p.m. 
3.30 p.m. 
5.20 a.m. 



9.15 A.M. 
2.05 p.m. 

2.20 a.m. 
7.30 a.m. 

12.15 A.M. 

12.25 a.m. 
4.05 a.m. 

9.15 A.M. 

8.15 p.m. 

5.55 a.m. 
5.30 p.m. 
9.00 p.m. 



to 10.00 p.m. 



9.00 p.m. to 

9.40 a.m. to 

8.45 a.m. to 
11.55 p.m. to 

12.15 p.m. to 
2.45 p.m. to 
9.15 a.m. to 
2.20 a.m. to 

12.10 A.M. 
3.40 a.m. to 7.30 a.m. 



5.40 a.m. 
5.05 a.m. 

1.15 P.M. 

12.15 p.m. 
2.45 p.m. 
6.00 p.m. 
9.15 p.m. 



1.12 
.14 

.421 

.11 
.42 
.081 
.061 
.05 
1.50 2 

.52 



4.42 



7.30 a.m. 
3.30 p.m. 



10.15 A.M. tO 



9.00 p.m. 
3.00 p.m. 



9.45 a.m. 
8.10 a.m. 
9.35 a.m. 
3.40 p.m. 
1.25 A.M. 
6.00 p.m. 



8.20 p.m. to 



30 A.M. 
50 p.m. 
30 p.m. 
50 p.m. 
35 p.m. 
05 A.M. 

.10 A.M. 

.00 P.M. 



Date. 



Apr. 1, . 
Apr. 2, . 
Apr. 2,. 
Apr. 5, . 
Apr. 7, . 
Apr. 9, . 
Apr. 11, . 
Apr. 12, . 
Apr. 15, . 
Apr. 17, . 
Apr. 20, . 
Apr. 21, . 
Apr. 26, . 
Apr. 27, . 
Apr. 28, . 
Apr. 30, . 

Total, 



May 4, 
May 6, 
May 8, 
May 9, 
May 11, 
May 13, 
May 25, 
May 26, 



Total, 



June 3, . 
June 4, . 
June 4, . 
June 15, . 
June 16, . 
June 20, . 
June 27, . 
June 30, . 

Total, 



July 1, . 
July 2, . 
July 5, . 
July 6, . 
July 7, . 
July 11, . 
July 12, . 
July 21, . 
July 23, . 
July 28, . 
July 30, . 
Aug. 1, . 

Total, 



Amount. 



.29 

.302 

.03 2 
1.27 2 

.05 

1.60 2 

.23 

1.772 
.65 



6.19 




2.77 



.12 

.06 
.04 

.35 
1.16 



Duration. 



3.15 p.m. to 

1.25 A.M. 
3.45 p.m. to 10.40 p.m. 
7.25 a.m. to 5.00 p.m. 
3.55 a.m. to 

1.50 A.M. 
11.00 P.M. to 

3.10 A.M. 

6.45 p.m. to 

1.30 A.M. 

2.30 p.m. to 

1.15 A.M. 
12.40 A.M. to 

7.30 p.m. 
8.30 a.m. to 

12.30 A.M. 



8.0.0 p.m. to 
3.30 p.m. to 
9.15 p.m. to 
7.30 p.m. to 



8.00 A.M. 

3.25 a.m. 
6.00 p.m. 
2.30 a.m. 



1.73 



.94 

.02 
1.04 

.12 
.03 
.17 
.21 
.11 
.04 
.09 



2.77 



10.50 p.m. to 

4.45 a.m. 
9.15 a.m. to 8.00 p.m. 
9.10 p.m. to 

7.30 a.m. 
1.25 a.m. to 4.25 a.m. 
9.00 p.m. to 

9.30 a.m. 



7.30 p.m. 

1.20 p.m. 
2.45 p.m. 

8.50 p.m. 
4.50 p.m. 
2.40 p.m. 
7.30 a.m. 
2.30 a.m. 
8.30 a.m. 
12.05 a.m. 



to 

4, 
to 1 
to 

11 

to 11 

to 5 

to 4 

to 5 

to 8 

to 1 

to 4 



00 P.M. 
30 p.m. 

00 A.M. 

20 p.m. 
05 p.m. 
40 P.M. 
30 p.m. 
30 p.m. 
30 p.m. 
05 p.m. 



1 Snow. 



2 Rain and snow. 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



127 



Table No. 4. 



Rainfall in Inches at Chestnut Hill Reservoir in 1914 — 
Concluded. 



Date. 


Amount. 


Duration. 


Date. 


Amount. 


Duration. 


Aug. 3, . 




.04 


3.25 a.m. to 


4.35 a.m. 


Nov. 2, 




.04 


6.30 a.m. to 7.30 a.m. 


Aug. 3, . 


} 


.06 


7.20 p.m. to 




Nov. 7, 




.02 


4.50 p.m. to 10.00 p.m. 


Aug. 4, . 






12.55 a.m. 


Nov. 8, 


} 


.24 


9.00 p.m. to 


Aug. 11, . 




.02 


6.25 a.m. to 


6.50 a.m. 


Nov. 9, 




2.40 a.m. 


Aug. 11, . 


} 


.51 


8.00 p.m. to 




Nov. 15, 




.45 


5.30 p.m. to 


Aug. 12, . 






9.00 p.m. 


Nov. 16, 




3.00 p.m. 


Aug, 17, . 




.03 


1.40 a.m. to 


6.05 a.m. 


Nov. 19, 


I 


2.15 


8.30 a.m. to 


Aug. 17, . 




.08 


4.30 p.m. to 


8.00 p.m. 


Nov. 20, 




4.00 A.M. 


Aug. 18, . 


} 


.32 


8.00 p.m. to 




Nov. 20, 




.04 


8.30 a.m. to 3.00 p.m. 


Aug. 19, . 






12.10 A.M. 
















Aug. 19, . 


I 


1.00 


10.50 p.m. to 




Total, 




2.94 




Aug. 20, . 


I 






4.25 a.m. 










Aug. 20, . 


i 


.76 


10.00 p.m. to 


6.20 a.m. 










Aug. 21, . 










Aug. 21, . 




.48 


8.40 a.m. to 


8.30 p.m. 










Aug. 24, . 




.02 


3.25 p.m. to 


3.45 p.m. 


Dec. 2, . 




.21 


7.15 a.m. to 7.30 p.m. 


Aug. 28, . 


} 


.51 


11.00 p.m. to 




Dec. 7, . 


} 


.972 


8.40 a.m. to 


Aug. 30, . 






7.00 A.M. 


Dec. 8, . 
Dec. 13, . 




10.00 A.M. 












} 


1.01 


7.15 p.m. to 


Total, 




3.83 






Dec. 14, . 




4.20 a.m. 












Dec. 19, . 
Dec. 21, . 




.24 
.731 


2.30 p.m. to 11.40 p.m. 












6.20 a.m. to 11.30 A.M. 


Sept. 3, 


1 


.26 


11.40 p.m. to 




Dec. 21, . 




.37 


11.30 a.m. to 4.30 p.m. 


Sept. 4, 


[ 






1.50 A.M. 


Dec. 24, . 




.051 


3.30 p.m. to 10.30 p.m. 


Sept. 29, 


I 


.09 


10.00 p.m. to 




Dec. 29, . 


} 


.40 


4.00 a.m. to 


Sept. 30, 


/ 






7.00 A.M. 


Dec. 30, . 
Total, 




7.30 a.m. 


Total, . 


0.35 


3.98 




Oct. 16, . * . 


} 


1.33 


2.30 a.m. to 












Oct. 17, . 






4.10 p.m. 










Oct. 19, . 




.15 


5.30 a.m. to 


1.30 p.m. 










Oct. 26, . 


} 


.18 


11.15 p.m. to 












Oct. 27, . 






3.45 a.m. 










Oct. 30, . 




.05 


12.30 a.m. to 12.55 a.m. 










Total, 


1.71 





Total for year 38.99 inches, 
i Snow. 2 Rain and snow. 



128 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 









OO 

HO 



r-S£ 



o 

eo 



53 

03 



6 

H 

m 
< 





•* 


CM 


o 


CO 


© 


00 


00 


© 


00 


oo 


■* 


eo 


© 


no 


eo 


© 


<M 


"* 


© 




c3 


00 


© 


■* 


■># 


l>- 


no 


no 


© 


no 


© 


!>. 


O0 


no 


00 


t~ 


t-H 


CM 


no 


00 


Tjl 


,_, 




,_, 




no 


OO 


© 


CO 


eo 


© 


no 


t^. 


■* 


t^ 


00 


© 


rH 








O 


no 


no 


-<*< 


no 


no 


■«*< 


•* 


■f 


■* 


"* 


■■cH 


CO 


-* 


eo 


eo 


■* 


■>* 


CO 




•<* 


H 






































00 




I 




© 


CO 


no 


© 


© 


© 


00 


OS 


CO 


© 


eo 


© 


T* 


I-H 


no 


eo 


© 


© 


© 


•**! 


© 


o 




CO 


CM 


© 


00 


t--. 


CM 


-<*< 


© 


© 


eo 


o 


Oi 


o. 


00 


■* 


1— i 


gfe 


«o 


CO 


CM 


CO 


© 


t>. 


CO 


CM 


CO 


■* 


TJH 


eo 


CO 


CM 


eo 


■* 


CM 


eo 


no 


■*f 


^— 






































t^ 




Q 










































1 

a . 


CM 


1—1 


•* 


■<*< 


eo 


CO 


© 


CM 


CM 


no 


*# 


no 


00 


t>. 


*CH 


CM 


© 


l>- 


00 


*-H 


CO 


00 


© 


-* 


-# 


© 


CO 


© 


no 


CM 


!>• 


© 


CO 


1— 1 


1—1 


© 


no 


© 


CM 


■* 


> s 


t^ 


CO 


,_| 


CO 


<m 


o 


CM 


_ 


CM 


CM 


no 


1H 


1— 1 


"*H 


*# 


■<* 


CM 


CM 


,_! 


eo 


OXJ 






































© 




£ 










































Sh' 


•* 




CM 


o 


© 


CO 


CO 


00 


^ 


no 


00 


CO 


o 


o 


■* 


eo 


CM 


00 


oo 


r~ 


© 


CM 


t>. 


© 


t^ 


eo 


■* 


t~ 


00 


© 


© 


T ~< 


t~ 


•* 


CM 


no 


© 


oo 


CO 


-<*• 


O 


o 


r^ 


CM 


CM, 


CO 


© 


"*l 


,—, 


i-H 


eo 


no 


CM 


,—1 


T-H 


no 


CM 


CO 


1— 1 


CM 


CO 


o 






































© 




O 










































1 

a . 


CO 


•JO 


1— 1 


eo 


© 


© 


eo 


© 


© 




© 


>* 


© 


© 


■<* 


t^ 


"# 


no 


no 


© 


CD 


1—1 


1— ' 


■* 


r_l 


CM 


© 


eo 


© 


CO 


no 


o 


C3 


00 


© 


1-1 


*# 


*-l 


00 


© 


+2 CJ 

ax: 

0) 
02 


»— 1 


CO 


-*l 


CO 


CO 


•* 


CM 


no 


•CO 


CM 


© 


1—1 


eo 


CM 


CO 


CM 


■* 


o 


CO 


CO 










































-ij 


!>. 




© 


00 


oo 


no 


00 


00 


© 


■* 


© 


© 


© 


l-~ 


© 


© 


no 


© 


© 


t>. 


s 


■>*< 


CO 


cm 


«™l 


U0 


© 


oo 


CO 


© 


eo 


CM 


■* 


no 


00 


•* 


00 


© 


no 


© 


T-< 


bjD 


CO 


o 


CO 


CO 


■* 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


■* 


,— 1 


© 


eo 


CO 


no 


CM 


CO 


■>* 


no 


■* 


3 




r— 1 


































o. 




<j 












































no 


^ 


CM 


o 


© 


t-- 


CO 


■<CH 


© 


CM 


eo 


no 


no 


CM 


eo 


no 


t^ 


CM 


1—) 


CM 


>> 


CO 


o 


00 


CM 


© 


00 


•>* 


OO 


eo 


no 


© 


00 


CM 


no 


no 


CO 


eo 


© 


no 


OS 


3 


00 


CO 


CO 


CO 


>o 


CO 


eo 


eo 


no 


no 


CO 


CO 


-CH 


,—1 


CM 


CM 


CM 


eo 


© 


eo 


►■o 






































!>• 






1—1 


^ 




© 




^ 


t^ 


•<* 


00 


no 


■* 


© 


eo 


© 


t^ 


O0 


© 


© 


no 


no 


(D 
1-5 


1— 1 


1— 1 


no 


110 


no 


no 


CO 


■>*l 


00 


© 


no 


CM 


© 


eo 


CO 


"■# 


C5 


© 


© 


no 


no 


CO 


no 


CO 


_ 


CM 


o 


eo 


•** 


no 


CO 


t— 1 


eo 


•* 


CM 


© 


© 


CM 


CO 


CO 






































© 






CO 


00 


CO 


-<*< 


CM 


"* 


TtH 


© 


eo 


oo 


© 


■* 


no 


CO 


© 


© 


^H 




© 


no 


>> 


o 


CO 


CO 


CO 


© 


CM 


CM 


© 


00 


no 


05 


CO 


© 


r-t 


no 


t>. 


r^ 


© 


'-H 


TH 


c3 


no 


CO 


_ 


Tt< 


t~ 


CM 


r-, 


CM 


© 


CO 


CM 


no 


CM 


CM 


,_! 


no 


eo 


CO 


(M 


eo 






































© 






CM 


CO 


M< 


CO 


■># 


CO 


o 


no 


© 


CM 


no 


CM 


1— 1 




CM 


co 


© 


T— ( 


© 


eo 


°S-i 


CO 


TfH 


© 


t~- 


© 


CO 


1— t 


-<tl 


CO 


'— • 


CO 


© 


«>. 


© 


CM 


© 


© 


© 


00 


© 


CM 


"<*l 


,—1 


CM 


© 


-* 


CO 


t^ 


CM 


CO 


CM 


CM 


no 


eo 


CM 


-* 


eo 


■<CH 


© 


CO 


<1 






































l>- 








f~ 


no 


© 


CM 


o. 


00 


o 


no 


t^ 


CM 


t^ 


O0 


© 


© 


© 


00 


CO 


CO 


oo 


o 


CM 


t^ 




00 


CM 


no 


•^1 


© 


'^ 


00 


t~ 


CO 


© 


!>. 


CO 


no 


eo 


00 


CO 




Tt< 


(M 


o 


CO 


no 


>o 


CO 


CO 


CO 


no 




CM 


TtH 




eo 


no 


no 


•"* 


00 


><JH 


i 


CO 


o 


CM 


© 


CO 




CO 


CO 


CM 


■* 


CM 


CM 


© 


•*! 


CO 


CM 


no 


00 


1— 1 


CM 


00 
CM 


CO 

CO 


no 


CO 

00 


- 


© 




CO 

CM 


t^ 


CM 


CO 
CM 


00 


i-H 

© 


CM 

no 


CM 


CM 


no 
CM 


no 
CO 


© 

CO 


eo 


>> 

c3 


CO 


no 


CO 


CO 


n0 


CM 


no 


(N 


© 


© 


-*l 


o 


CM 


CO 


1—1 


r>. 


O0 


© 


i-H 


"* 


TtH 


CO 


© 


no 


!>• 


»>. 


00 


o 


1—1 


no 


00 


•* 


no 


OO 


© 


no 


eo 


■<* 


no 




=3 
c3 


CO 


CO 


CM 


■* 


i— 1 


CM 


«M 


TJH 


© 


CM 


CM 


CO 


eo 


no 


IM 


CM 


CO 


CO 


no 


eo 










































»-a 






































































































































































in 










































M 


& 








































c3 












































>H 






































m 

"c3 

o 
H 


00 

o 

u 
o 

> 

< 




l-^ 


00 


© 


o 




CM 


CO 


■* 


no 


CO 


r-~ 


oo 


© 


© 




CM 


eo 


*# 








© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


©• 






i-H 












00 


O0 


O0 


© 


© 


© 


C5 


© 


© 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 




1 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



129 






00 



C£> 

CO 



<» 
to 

o 

CO 
CO 

l"-H 



•<o 



o 
6 

B 



.0 


OS 


CO 


CM 


CO 


CM 


00 


t-^ 


o 


00 


T* 


*# 


CO 


o 


I-~ 


in 


o 


CM 


CO 


CO 




' eS 


T]H 


m 


o 


C3 


■* 


T-1 


' _l 


■* 


t^ 


' —l 


»n 


o 


t^ 


■<* 


©5 


o 


m 


00 


CM 


!>■ 


O 


lO 


OS 


"* 


r^ 


rH 


00 


Tt< 


C3i 


CM 


t^ 


CO 


CO 


CM 


fr- 


C5 


CO 


C5 


rH 


CO 


OS 


*# 


*# 


TfH 


lO 


T*H 


CO 


rjn 


CO 


CO 


■* 


Ttl 


TTl 


tH 


m 


"* 


in 


■* 


-tfl 


-"CH 


CO 


i 

a • 


tH 


CM 


t^ 


t^. 


■* 


CO 


CO 


o 


US 


t^ 


CM 


t^ 


00 


o 


-* 




CO 


CO 


CO 




OS 


CO 


00 


CO 


CO 


00 


C5 


CO 


us 


,— ' 


t- 


C5 


00 


-# 




CO 


CO 


1- 1 


OO 


00 


o 


CO 


o 


CO 


tH 


CM 


CO 


CM 


CO 


lO 


CM 


Th 


CO 


in 


CO 


in 


CO 


rH 


Tt< 


TJH 


Q 












































CO 


CO 


o 


CM 


00 


O0 


OS 


LO 


^ 


lO 


C5 


TH 


t^ 


CM 


OS 


o 


Oi 


o 


o 


CO 


OO 


t^ 


O0 


o 


CO 


t«- 


o 


- -1 


CO 


CO 


o 


CD 


CO 


CM 


CM 


CM 


o 


00 


CM 


"* 


> © 

OX! 


■>* 


IC 


lO 


t^ 


CM 


i-H 


*tf 


1-1 


— 1 


CM 


CO 


*# 


CM 


t>- 


. CO 


i-H 


CO 


m 


CM 


CO 












































in 


TJH 


CXI 


CM 


_ 


rfH 


in 


t--. 


o 


00 


05 


•* 


CO 


C5 


in 


_ 


CO 


t^ 


W 


rJH 


r0 


OO 


CM 


m 


■* 


00 


t^ 


OS 


o 


CO 


«* 


o 


CM 


CO 


OS 


CM 


m 


00 


"— i 


o 


CO 


o 


x*H 


CM 


00 


CO 


o 


CO 


CM 


CM 


us 


CM 


US 


CO 


CM 


Ttl 


■* 


o 


CO 


,-1 


■* 


in 


o 










































O 










































i 

s . 


CO 


CM 


CM 


OS 


00 


o 


<M 


"* 


CM 


lO 


CO 


o 


CM 


C75 


o 


o 


00 


«* 


"* 


CO 


CD u 


TtH 


CO 


CO 


CM 


O0 


CO 


CO 


t^ 


us 


O0 


■* 


OS 


CO 


in 


CO 


o 


CO 


00 


t--. 




a^o 


CO 


■* 


o 


rH 


r- t 


rH 


CM 


00 


T-l 


o 


— H 


CM 


T-H 


CO 


** 


CO 


CM 


CI 


y^i 


CM 


<o 










































m 










































■u 






00 


■* 






CO 


1^ 


CO 


lO 


OO 


o 


CO 


CM 


00 


fr- 


CO 


rH 


^ 


CO 


3 


US 


t^ 


CO 


OS 


lO 


o 


CO 


CO 


t^ 


CO 


»-' 




CM 


CM 


1—1 


00 


t^ 


■* 


•4* 


o 




US 


1—) 


CO 


CO 


CO 


-# 


1— I 


i-H 


o 


-* 


t^ 


Tjl 


US 


CO 


^CH 


CO 


Tt< 


■* 


US 


CM 












































t>- 


CO 


1/0 


r- 


CO 


t~- 


HO 


l>. 


CO 


l~- 


CO 


t^ 


CO 




TtH 


CO 


OS 


CO 


t^- 


CD 


>> 


US 




OS 


OS 


os 


CM 


CO 


t~- 


CO 


CO 


■* 


CM 


J^- 


-# 


C5 


■>* 


CO 


CM 


US 


CM 


=S 


CO 


OS 


CM 


CM 


CO 


CO 


CM 


T-H 


CM 


CO 


^H 


CO 


CO 


T-H 


00 


CM 


CO 


TJH 


CM 


CO 


1-5 










































CO 

C 
3 


■* 


TJH 


CO 


00 


OS 


■«CH 


OS 


CO 


o 


Ttl 


t- 


l~- 


in 


Ttl 


o 


CO 


t^. 


CO 


00 


in 


CM 


o 


"* 


00 


t-- 




CO 


CO 


TfH 


"* 


00 


-<*< 


CO 


in 


00 


o 


t>. 


t^ 


CO 


i ~ < 


CO 


CM 


CM 


CO 


co 


CM 


lO 


rH 


CM 


CO 


CM 


1— 1 


CM 


CM 


CM 


CM 


CO 


CM 


CM 


rH 


1-5 












































to 


CO 


o 


CO 


O0 


TJH 


^ 


t^ 


cs> 


r^ 


00 


o 


CO 


CM 


in 


rH 




00 


^ 


>* 


>> 


"3 


JT^ 


r^ 


OS 


m 


00 


>o 


o 




Tjl 


"* 


o 




CO 


OS 


CM 


o 


in 


CO 


CM' 


s 










































§ 


CO 


CM 


CO 


© 






CO 


"5 


^*l 


CO 


CO 


CO 




tH 


CM 


in 


CM 


in 


CO 


t*i 




CO 


o 


CO 


OS 


CM 




o 


CM 


TJH 


^ 


o 


CM: 


1^ 


CO 




T*t 




CO 


O 


CM 




CM 


CNI 


■* 


t>- 


t^ 


rt 


o 


CO 


CO 


■* 


CO 


CM 


CM 


■* 


TH 


CO 


OS 


CO 


CO 


TJH 


a 






CO 


US 


■>* 


CO 


CM 


,_! 


,_| 


■* 


CO 


CM 


-* 


CM 


CO 


CM 


CO 


o 


CO 


CO 


<! 










































j 


■"*> 


CO 


CO 


OS 


-* 


__ 


CO 


lO 


OO 


CM 


t^ 


^ 


o 


CM 


t-» 


CO 


CO 


CD 


t^ 


CO 


r4 

03 


t^ 


<* 


CO 


CO 




CO 


«>. 


CO 


t- 


t^ 


o 


CO 


OS 


o 


CO 


b- 


<* 


o 


CD 


Ttl 


CO 


r-~ 


O0 


■*tl 


us 


CO 


US 


CM 


,H 


"* 


rH 


CO 


■* 


CO 


CM 


b- 


CD 


"* 


CO 


rH 












































S 










































i 

ft h 


us 




"* 


t^ 


CO 


CO 


m 


HO 


l^ 


rt<, 


l>- 


00 


00 


00 


in 


^ 


CO 


■«*l 


o 






CM 


t~ 


OS 


lO 


oa 


CO 


lO 


■ 00 


US 


00 


CM 


t^ 


CO 


CO 


in 


CM 


^ 


CM 


OS 




CO 


•«*< 


o 


in 


CO 


CO 


TtH 


TtH 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CD 


TJH 


CO 


«-< 


CO 


in 


CO 


CO 


CO 


fa 










































>i 


CM 


CO 


CM 


CO 


00 


t^ 


CO 


>o 




OS 




CO 


O 


in 


t^ 


CO 


CM 


in 


CM 


os 


ea 


•* 


CO 


CM 


CO 


■<* 


lO 


lO 


C5 


O0 


o 


r^ 


CO 


CM 


- H 


CO 


m 


O 


00 


OS 


O 


§ 


CM 


- 1 


CO 


m 


CM 


CO 


LO 


us 


CM 


US 


■* 


CO 


in 


■* 


in 


CM 


t^ 


in 


CM 


■* 


H-B 










































« 










































<< 










































H 


•>• 








































>H 












































its 


CO 


r~ 


OO 




o 




CM 


CO 


-f 


US 


CD 


t^ 


°S 


OS 


o 




CM 


CO 


-r 




tm 


t^ 


1- 


t>- 


1 - 


OO 


00 


CO 


O0 


OO 


OO 


OO 


O0 


OO 


O0 


C5 


o 


OS 


OS 


OS 




00 


O0 


OO 


O0 


O0 


00 


DO 


O0 


O0 


O0 


O0 


OO 


00 


CO 


OO 


O0 


OO 


CO 


OO 


00 



130 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



13 

i— i 
o 

d 

o 

O 



GO 


CM 


o 


os 


00 


*-H 


US 


1— 1 


t^ 


CO 


CM 


i— 1 


OO 


00 


us 


us 


T* 


OO 


CXI 




1— t 


I-- 




oj 


CO 


t-~ 


r_| 


00 


CM 


CO 


I— 1 


o 


1— 1 


00 


CO 


■* 


CO 


'- , 


t^ 


CO 


CO 


!>» 


CO 


t^ 


CO 


OO 


4J 

O 


o 


CO 


CO 


>ra 


!>. 


o 


CO 


CO 


us 


CM 


CM 


■<* 


«# 


CO 


^H 


US 


00 


o 


■* 


t^ 


CM 


■* 


US 


•"*> 


■<* 


US 


CO 


us 


US 


"* 


•* 


<* 


"* 


«* 


■<*l 


CO 


•* 


CO 


CO 


■* 


■"* 


CO 


OS 


•* 


H 










































I-~ 




i 

s. 


us 


CM 


J 


00 


00 


Ttl 


OS 


00 


-* 


CM 




OS 


t^ 


•»tl 


us 


OS 


© 


CO 


00 


CO 


OO 


!"H 


CO 




CM 


CM 


t» 


l>. 


CO 


CO 


*"* 


a* 


o 


"Sh 


■* 


1-1 


o 


-*l 


CO 


1-1 


^^ 


■* 


■* 


OO 


C3 CD 

CD-Q 


CO 


CM 


US 


CO 


'-' 


CM 


OS 


CO 


CO 


CX3 


Tfl 


Tf 


■>* 


CO 


Tj< 


CX| 


CO 


US 


CO 


CO 


CXJ 


CO 


Q 














































a . 


CO 


CM 


o 


CO 


00 


o 


o 


us 


o 


CO 


t— 


OS 


cxi 


OO 


CO 


CO 


cxi 


T}t 


US 


CO 


»-H 


OS 


CO 


o 


rt< 


OS 


>— 1 


t^ 


OS 


"* 


US 


r~ 


o 


CO 


"-H 


OS 


CO 


' —l 


CO 


CO 


CO 


US 


us 


t>- 


> CD 
O-Q 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CM 


US 


CM 


1-1 


"-• 


^ 


CM 


CM 


CO 


o 


CO 


Tf 


■* 


CO 


CM 


CM 


US 


CO 


iz; 














































CD 


00 


CO 


f^ 




OS 


CO 


CM 


Tf4 


CM 


■>* 


•«* 


o 


t~ 


us 


CXJ 


CO 


OS 


us 


CO 


o 


o. 


CO 


J2 


CO 


t~ 


*# 


t~ 


CO 


O0 


00 


-tf> 


o. 


CO 


US 


■* 


1—1 


us 


»H 


00 


CO 


CO 


us 


co 


US 


00 


O 


o 


CO 


o 


CO 


CN) 


CO 


CM 


rt< 


■>* 


rH 


r-l 


CO 


•* 


CM 


tH 


tH 


CO 


CM 


US 


1— 1 


■>* 


CO 












































us 




O 














































i 

s . 

CD U 


o 


CM 


•>* 


CX| 


US 


CO 


o 


■>* 


US 


O 


00 


o 


CO 


t~ 


T* 


OS 


us 


CO 


b~ 


OS 


OS 


O0 


CO 


t- 


OS 


CO 


OS 


CO 


CO 


us 


t^ 


00 


OO 


CO 


t— 


CI 


t^ 


"* 


t>. 


t^ 


t^ 


CM 


CM 


CO 


CD 


CM 


!>• 


CM 


CM 


CO 


CO 


CO 


■■Ch 




US 


CO 


CO 


00 


o 


rH 


CM 


<M 




CO 


o 


us 

CO 


CO 


+-> 


US 


O 




t^ 


CO 


CO 


t^ 


O 


!>. 


CO 


o 


CM 


1-^ 


l>- 


CO 


CX5 


"* 


us 


T(H 


CM 


CX| 


us 


3 


'- , 


Tjl 


us 


1—1 


»*H 


CXJ 


us 


■<* 


CO 


00 


t^ 


o 


o 


us 


ca 


CO 


OS 


o 


o 


00 


o 


CO 


M 


"* 


CM 


CO 


OO 


rH 


CM 


Tf 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CM 


CO 


rH 


** 


CM 


CM 


-# 


CO 


CO 


CO 


■<* 


CO 


3 










































US 




«! 










































i-H 






*# 




"* 


OS 


CXI 


CM 




n< 


t~- 


CO 


r~ 


CXI 


CO 




OS 


CO 


OS 


■^ 


o 


Tt< 


CO 


■>* 


>> 


o 


US 


'CM 


o 


CX| 


■* 


t>. 


C35 


t^ 


C3 


>* 


■>* 


00 


t^. 


US 


o 


>— ' 


CM 


CO 


Tin 


CO 


us 


3 


US 


CM 


us 


"* 


CO 


CM 


us 


CM 


CM 


1—* 


us 


CO 


1— t 


CO 


1-H 


CM 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


_ 


CO 


i-s 
















































t- 


CM 


CO 


00 




OS 


00 


C5 


us 


o 


o 




CO 


CO 




OO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


O 


•* 




3 
3 


t- 


CM 


■>* 


-<*l 


US 


OS 


CO 


OO 


CM 


00 


o 


05 


us 


00 


00 


CO 


US 


■<tl 


OS 


OS 


CM 


o 


CM 


CO 


■<CM 


CM 


CM 


CM 


rH 


CM 


o: 


CM 


US 


CO 


CO 


o 


(M 


Tt< 


CM 


o 


,_< 


rH 


o 


CO 


HS 










































CM 






CXI 


t— 


t^ 


CM 


US 


CM 


CO 


CO 


CO 


US 




CO 


CO 




CO 


OS 




US 


t^ 


O0 


CO 


CXI 


>> 


O 


us 


CO 


cn 


*# 


CO 


CM 


00 


<Si 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


us 


■* 


CM 


o 


us 


OS 


o 


l>. 


CO 


£ 


CM 


<M 


Ttl 


CO 


r _l 


-* 


!>. 


,_! 


o 


CM 


,_! 


US 


CO 


US 


CXI 


rH 


,—, 


■«** 


CO 


CO 


CM 


CO 










































CO 






W 


t~ 


CM 


CO 


o 


O0 


o 


CO 


OS 


t~ 


CX| 


CO 




OO 


t^ 


US 


^ 


t>- 


US 


o 


OS 


CO 


■g 


(M 


US 


OO 


CD 


OS 


US 


CO 


1-1 


<3> 


OO 


t>. 


O0 


■* 


OO 


CO 


r^ 


00 


co 


CM 


l -1 


o 


>o 


a 


"5 


i-H 


CM 


rj* 


,_, 


CM 


00 


"* 


CM 


00 


CX| 


CM 


CO 


,_! 


•* 


CXI 


CN 


■* 


•ct* 


US 


CO 


CO 


<J 








































1 








O0 


"* 


CO 


o 




US 


1-^ 


-*1 


CO 


CM 


us 


cxi 




CXI 


CO 


US 


OS 


CO 


US 


t~ 


r^ 


CO 


OS 


CM 


co 


■* 


o 


CO 


US 


CO 


CO 


t>. 


*-< 


co 


CJ 


00 


CM 


00 


US 


Tfl 


t^ 


us 


-# 


■* 


02 


CM 


US 


CO 


CM 


t^ 


CO 


CO 


US 


CO 


CM 


CO 


CO 


,-H 


CO 


-*l 


o 


CO 


CO 


us 


-* 


OO 


-* 


§ 
















































OS 


00 




OS 




■* 


CX| 


OO 


us 


o 


o 


CM 


t^ 


CO 


OS 


CO 


t~ 


t~ 


CXI 


t- 


t>. 


CO 


CO 




o 


■* 


OS 




us 


1-1 


C5 


o 


CXI 


OS 


rt 


US 


:>. 


o 


r^. 


l>. 


OO 


o 


CM 


l -1 




- 1 


t^ 


CM 


T*< 


"* 


os 


*-l 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CX| 


CM 


CM 


■* 


us 


US 


CM 


CM 


CM 


"* 


US 


Tfl 


fe 




















• 






















1— 1 




(A 


CO 


OS 


o 


CO 


00 


CO 


CM 


CM 


o 


lr~ 


CO 


t^ 


OO 


o 


OO 


OS 


00 


■* 


1^ 


US 


^ 


00 


c3 


o 


CO 


o 


00 


•-I 


C35 


00 


US 


O0 


00 


CM 


-CH 


CM 


CO 


OS 


CO 


00 


OS 


1—1 


OO 


o 


o 


3 
d 
o3 


-* 


CM 


Tt< 


co 


** 


-* 


r-< 


CM 


CO 


Tj< 


US 


CM 


CO 


CO 


CO 


us 


CXI 


<M 


CO 


CO 


CO 

O 
J— ( 


Tt< 












































t-s 






















































































































































































OQ 


« 












































c3 


<< 












































CD 


H 












































>s 


^ 










































o 
H 


o 

0> 
fcD 

03 

w 

CD 

> 

< 




US 


CO 


t^ 


00 


OS 


o 




CX| 


CO 


■>* 


US 


CO 


t^- 


00 


OS 


o 




CM 


CO 


■* 








OS 


en 


OS 


OS 


OS 


o 


o 


O 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


















00 


oo 


OO 


OO 


OO 


OS 


OS 


Oi 


02 


CT> 


05 


C32 


o 


05 


OS 


OS 


OS 


OS 


OS 


OS 







522 « 

o .-c • 

^ s « § 

co a m u 

^Ofe C3 

c &"ot a 

03 O 3^ 
i*_n co g 

.■§ |^-S 
■%*$£ 



M 



O 



3 
O 66 
H CO 



o 



. .A .• 

23ao 
« ° 0+i 

-S«2Koo- 

. - OS 

uj S-OE2 

sIPcd 

t; U E3I-S 

20 



03 


O 

en 

CD 




m 


hJ^ 


T3 


£ 






3 


_o 
"3 


93 

> 
't 


rdrt 

oc2 
3 en 


d 


O 


< 










d 



dja 


13 

3 








7> 




!h 


rt 


03 

O 
B3 


co 

30 


03 


£ 

rt 


ft 


1—1 


^ 


,T3 


03 

M 

CD 


t-l 

CD 


oi. 

d 


3 


S. 


c 



H 


> 


H 


rt 


01 


CDX 




+J 


O -P 




S3 


5? 


3 

c 



> 


d 





■J. 


7) 





4-1 




3 


■p 


CD 


B 


c 


rt 


d 


cfl 


G 


CD 

rr. 


3^ 


" 


1-5 


01, 
3 


00 


Si 




d 



£ 


CO 




+s 


rt 




C 


d 


Ph 


rt 


"i 


-^ 






d 


a 


1'i 


< 


03 

CD 

3 


c 


3 


C 


„ 


T3 


CD OS 




kl 


rt 


SO 




03 







No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



131 






00 



Si 

8 

8 






8 

$-. 
<» 

so 
SS 

o 

8 



T-l T-l (M 



ec i-h i-H 



"8 

CO 
S- 

8 



8 

8 



i-h i-i eo 



rt <M CM 






CM ~H i-l i-H 



-"8 
•■s> 



O 

m 

<! 



3 ^ _" 



r "3 u -B A 

■K 8 <U H el 



r* 3 



ft 



3 
M 

3 



o ^ fl 



< < 



132 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



73 
o 
73 
j3 
'a 

o 

O 



^t- 






Ob 



B 
S3 

CM 



Pi, 

o 
e 



73 
i- 



3 



© 



d 
s 

< 



Mean for 
18 Years, 
1897-1914. 


o 


o 


© 


© 


© 


o 


© 


o 


© 


© 


o 


© 


© 


© 


o 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


o 


o 


© 


© 


© 


o 


o 


q 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 






























r~ 


CO 


o^ 


OS 




CO 


CO 


lO 


OS 


© 


f^ 


GO 


CO 


CO 


oo 


lO 


OS 


!>. 




CM 


t^ 


«r- 


co 




CO 


CO 


t^ 






CO 


CO 

CM 


CM 


CM 


t^ 


CO 


co 


CO 


lO 


t^ 


- 


©_ 


»o 




o 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 




o 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


nJ 


o 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 






























iH 


o 




r^ 


CO 


OS 


!>. 


OS 




CM 


CO 




CM 


«* 


GO 


e> 


OS 


GO 


CO 


OS 


OS 




CM 


CO 




CO 




t>. 


CO 


© 


T-4 


OS 


- 


CO 


cm" 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CM 


1 




CM 


CO 


OS 


CM 




o 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


-© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 




o 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


w 


o 


o 


© 


© 


©_ 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


©_ 


©_ 






























»H 


■* 


t-^ 


co" 


co" 


GO 


© 


OS 


© 


OS 


GO 


© 


lO 


Os" 


GO 


0) 




CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


GO 




CO 




r^ 


CO 


ta 


l> 




tH 


-* 


GO 


CM 


© 
cm" 


© 


CM 






CM 


CO 


CO 


os 


00 


CO 




o 


o 


© 


© 


© 


O 


© 


© 


o 


© 


o 


© 


© 


© 




o 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


C4 


o 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 






























rH 


© 


f^ 






1^ 




lO 


lO 


OS 


HO 


CM 


CO 




© 


O) 


oo 


CM 


CO 


CO 


OS 


CO 


CO 


CM 


oo 


"* 


"* 


OS 


OS 




tH 


t>. 


OS 


GO 

cm" 


°1 
cm 


t-- 


CO 




i—l 






-* 


t^. 


00 


CM 




o 


o 


© 


© 


o 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 




o 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


o 


© 


© 


tH 


o 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 






























iH 


CO 


no 


OS 


CO 






t^ 


00 




GO 


lO 


t^ 


CM 


t-~ 


01 


t--. 


CM 


CO 


OS 


CO 


*o 


m 


oo 


oo 




CO 


CO 


GO 


CM 


tH 


t^ 


CO 


CO 


CO 


■* 


CO 








t~ 


© 


© 


CO 


CO 




o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 




o 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 




o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 
































tH 


CO 


"0 


© 


■*J< 


GO 


"* 


CM 


CO 


HO 


00 


">* 




GO 




o> 


"* 


-tfl 


<* 


CO 


© 


CM 


CO 


00 


*# 


CO 


U0 


OS 


CM 


o 


y-l 


CO 


CO 


CO 


© 


CO 


GO 










CO 


CO 


00 


CM 




o 


o 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 




o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


0> 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 






























e 


CM 


CO 


OS 


cm 


CM 


CM 


CO 


CO 


00 


© 


CO 


t^ 


GO 


© 


0> 


OS 


in 


CM 


CM 




CO 


CO 


OS 


© 


OS 


CO 


CO 




I>. 


TH 


US 


lO 

cm" 


N 


CM 


CM_ 


CO 


CM 




CM 




CO 


U0 


OS 


CM 




© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 




o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


o 


© 


© 


00 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


o 


© 


© 






























o 


CO 


CO 


cxi 


OS 


uo 


CO 


© 


CO 


00 


00 


>o 


1^ 


t^ 


00 


01 


CO 


CO 


OS 


CO 




o 


CM 


•* 


00 


U0 


CM 


GO 


■■* 


CO 


tH 


t^ 


t~ 


CM 


CM 


T*< 


Tt< 


CM 


*# 








CO 


00 


CM 




o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


o 


© 


© 


© 




o 


© 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


t^ 


o 


©. 


© 


© 


© 


© 


©_ 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


©_ 






























o 


GO 


cm" 


i>r 


CO 


lO 


CO 


lO 


r~- 


© 


CM 


© 




o 


>o" 


o» 


IC 


OS 


OS 


CO 


CO 


l^ 


CO 


oo 




00 


*# 


CO 


GO 


CM 


tH 


-# 


CO 


CO 


■* 


OS 


t^ 


CO 




GO 


CO 


uq 

CM 


OS 


- 


r^ 




o 


© 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


O 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 




o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


o 


© 


(O 


© 


©, 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 






























e 


c<r 


!>■" 


© 


OS 


co" 


■* 


00 




t-~ 


© 


OS 


•>* 


CO 


CO 


o» 


CO 


CM 


CO 


© 


CO 


GO 


CM 


OS 


t^ 


co 


•** 


OS 


■* 




lH 


- 


© 


GO 


CM 


U0 


- 


t^ 


in 


CM 


lO 


!>■ 


t^ 


CO 


CO 






























aT 






























A 






























-p 






























a 






























o 






























a 






























M 


EH 




























"m 


iZ! 




























+s 
co 


o 




























<o 


§ 


















U 










6 

bfl 




>> 


>> 

(-1 














£ 

a 

CO 


iS 






c3 


03 
U 
0) 




03 

a 


c3 


o 
u 


a 
< 




cd 
d 

d 
t-s 


13 


03 

M 

< 


o 

o 


a 

CD 

> 
o 


a 

O 

0) 

Q 


> 

< 


> 

< 



>* 00 
CM CO 



GO co 

a s 






OS 




u 






cm 






c3 
CD 


el 




M 


est 




C3 








OS 






a 




O 


OS 




^ 


rH 




? 


on 




03 


© 






OS 




O 








+s 




a 


c 




<i> 


CD 




CJ 


CJ 




0) 

a 


u 

CD 

a 




6M 


o 




i?l 


i^ 




O 






+J 


r— 




bD 


© 

cs 




U 












c 


C 




3 






o 






s 

c3 


o 
o 




m 












efl 


a 




u 


© 




D 






(/j 








CD 






© 






OS 




ert 






? 


fi 




T3 






a; 


-(-> 




T3 


a 




-! 


CD 










o 






rt 


t-t 






Cu 




r/s 


a 




T3 


^ H 




o 


uo 


«* 


u 




OS 


U0 

o 


T— I 


cu 


OS 


(-1 


1— < 


.pH 


cv 


C 


+3 

c 

CD 


a 


CD 


CJ 


S 


(H 


hfi 




a 


n 


Fh 






CD 


-* 


m 


a 




a 






S 


•"i 


-c 


m< 


d 


r) 


« 


« 


-0 


© 

OS 


CO 

OS 

T-H 


m 

3 


a 


_d 


T3 

OQ 


■+3 

c 

CD 


■p 

CI 
CD 
O 


QJ 

+s 

C3 


(-1 

CD 

a 


U 
CD 

a 




CD 


OS 


0) 


co 


CD 










co 


(M 


S*H 


O 


^H 



O OS OS 

© d d 



d 


d 


0) 


CD 


CJ 


CJ 


fc- 


u 


CD 


CD 


a 


a 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



133 









Si 



<» 

© 
© 

0) 



CO 



"© 



'c-a 



GO 

6 

m 
<j 





o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 




o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


© 


© 


o 


° 


t- 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


00 

00 






























© 


© 


00 


© 


05 


CO 


«0 


TtH 




o 


OS 


CO 


TH 


rH 


oo 


C<l 


CD 


CM 


o 










02 


CD 


■* 


m 


CO 


"?. 


oo 


00 


© 


o 


-* 


1—1 


C<1 


tH 


T— * 


CO 


CD 


1-H 


cq 




c<r 


c<" 


oj" 


of 


^ 
















'- r 






o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 




o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


co 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


00 
00 


































© 


1^ 


o 


CO 


CO 


■»* 


t^ 


CO 


CO 


© 


t^ 


CO 


CO 


o 


lO 


rf 


C<] 


o 




C5 




■* 


t>. 


C5 


00 


CM 


Th 


oo 


o 


°l 


t^ 


CM 


'—1 




'-H 


«-H 


CO 


© 


©_ 


CM 




** 


n~ 


c<f 


rH * 
















~ 


~ 






© 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 




o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


© 


© 


© 


irt 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


© 


o 


© 


© 


00 
00 

tH 






























m 


-* 


CM 


lO 


CO 


CO 


<M 


o 




CD 


t^ 


rh 






CO 


lO 


t~ 




CO 


CM 


CO 


■<*• 


Csl 


CO 


t^ 


t^ 


o 


© 


c<l 


CO 


U0 


00 


CO 


T*< 




C^l 




CO 






© 


CO 


































'""' 


7-1 


1-1 


1-1 


rH 












^ 


^ 








o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


© 


o 


© 


© 




o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


© 


o 


© 


o 


^w 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o s 


© 


© 


© 


© 


00 
00 

iH 






























m 


CM 


Ui 


CO 


o 


CO 


«* 


t--. 


^ 


CO 


in 


in 


© 


© 


© 


"* 


00 


liO 


CO 




CM 


iO 


TtH 


00 


l>- 


C<] 


(M 


© 


© 


00 


1^- 


oo 


o 


■<* 


CM 


ca 






iH 


© 


1—4 


e» 






cm" 


co" 


<m" 


*-<" 
















"-*' 






o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 




o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


© 


© 


© 


e»s 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


© 


©_ 


© 


00 
00 

t-t 






























lO 


CO 




o 


t^ 


o 


o 


OS 




CO 


in 


■* 


CO* 


in 


CO 


CO 




o 


CO 


o 




t— 


Ci 


oo 


© 


© 


CO 


rfH 


CO 


© 


CO 


CO 


OS 


CO 


1— 1 






>"H 


CM 


"-H 


in 








^ 


** 


rt ~ 
























o 


© 


© 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 




o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


© 


© 


o 


© 


Pfl 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


© 


© 


o 


© 


00 
00 

iH 
































CO 


© 


!>• 


CM 


OS 


CO 


m 


l^~ 


03 


OS 


in 


C<1 




TH 


o 


CO 


CO 


OS 


CM 


00 


in 


o 


OS 


© 




CD 




<M_ 


TJH_ 


oo 


00 


CM 


in 






CO 


CM 


CM 


CO 


00 


<M 




^ 


<m" 


el 




~ 






















o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


© 


© 


© 




o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


© 


© 


© 


o 


i-J 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


© 


© 


o 


00 

oo 

1-1 






























m 


CO 


rH 


CO 


lO 


00 


CD 


00 


l>- 


CD 


m 


in 


© 


© 




rH 


o 


■* 


CO 


CO 


t^ 


1*1 


ai 


oo 


© 


!>• 


t^ 


CO 


-* 


in 


© 


>o 


OS 


co_ 


Cd 


l-H 


rH 


1— 1 


CO 


I> 


© 


CO 






rt " 


rH 


** 




rt ~ 




















o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


© 


© 


o 




o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


© 


© 


© 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


© 


o 


©_ 


©_ 


00 
00 

1-1 






























o 


t~ 


rH 


C5 


TJH 


lO 


CO 


OS 


o 


<M 


m 


in 


oo 


co" 


cq 


00 


!>. 


CO 




t^ 


t~ 




00 


© 


© 


(r~ 


t^ 


rh 


y— I 


J>^ 


co_ 


l-H 


lO 


T— < 


1—1 


r-i 




*— 1 


<M 


i-H 


in 


1— 1 




-*" 


rt 


^ 


'-<" 
























o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


o 




o 


o 


© 


o 


o 


o 


o, 


o 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


o 


o> 


o 


o 


o 


<p. 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


oo 

l-l 






























o 




o 


co" 


•<# 


CO 


t~ 


m 






© 


CO 


■* 


© 


o 




CO 








"0 


OS 


** 


^ 


© 


CD 


© 


CO 


t>. 


b- 


CO_ 


T-H 


iH 


"<*l 


1—* 


CO 


1— 1 




cq 


Tt< 


CO 


<M 






rH ~ 


cq" 


co" 


** 






















o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 




© 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


00 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


© 


© 


© 


o 


© 


00 

1-1 






























o 


lO 


t^ 


CO 


■<* 


CO 


00 


CO 




CO 


CO 


t^ 


cq 


C<I 




CO 


o 


CN1 


03 


o 


<M 


t^ 


CO 




© 


!>. 


in 


CO 


00 


TH 


in 


CO 


CO 


»c 




■* 




in 


CD 




*tfl 


in 


































<-< 


cm" 


CO 


rt 


^ 












1-1 


CO 


^ 






© 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


© 


o 


o 


© 


© 




o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


© 


© 


o 


© 


© 


e> 


© 


© 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


© 


© 


o 


© 


© 


00 






























00 


© 


rH 


-* 




1^ 


<M 




o 




00 


© 


■^ 


CM 


"3 


Tf< 




OS 


OS 


<35 


o 


CM 


CO 


CO 




03 




© 


"*• 


CO 


© 


oo 
rH" 


cq_ 
e4" 


M 


lO 


<M 






CO 


■* 


CM 


CM_ 


m 




o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


o 




o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


© 


© 


o 


© 


© 


(O 


o 


© 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


© 


o 


© 


o 


© 


00 






























CO 


oo 


m 


(M 


00 


CM 


CO 


»n 


■**■ 


■>* 


00 


CO 


in 


•># 


■* 


CO 


CO 


OS 


CO 


CM 


oo 


o 


oo 


CO 


00 


in 


CO 


oo 




CO 


co_ 


rH 
rH 


<rq 

co" 


T-H 


CM 


J— 1 


■* 




CM 


© 


■* 


Zr 


CO 




o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 




o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


© 


© 


© 


o 


US 


© 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


00 






























CO 


CO 


rH 


OS 


00 


o 




CD 


t^ 


CO 


CM 


^* 


(M 


rh 


© 


© 


o 


-*l 


oo 


tr^ 


<M 


05 


o 


■* 


© 


oo 


!>. 


t^ 




■"*!. 


© 


o 


>— J_ 


oo 


CO 


CO 


CM 


CD 


co_ 


in 


© 


m 






"-<" 


-<" 


co" 


rt " 












'- r 




































9} 






























rfl 




























































o 






























a 






























X 


w 




























'55 


H 




























-4-) 


g 




























oo 


o 




























a> 


3 


















01 




(-" 
o> 


111 
Si 


o" 

CJ 


i 

C3 




K*> 


>> 












- 


£> 


(-T 


s 

> 

o 


(1 
01 


0i 




u 

a 

a 

CJ 


3 

01 


u 


'IS 
a 
<! 


C3 


a 

>-3 




+3 

01 

M 


s 

01 

a 

0) 


o> 

o 
a 

o 


s 

a 

01 

Q 


5 


> 



X 



134 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc, 



73 

d 
d 



o 
O 









<4> 
ft 



S-h 



e 



-*2 



<*5 






00 

d 

m 
H. 





o 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 




o 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


iH 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


O 
05 
iH 






























IT- 


o 


tO 


■* 


^*l 


CO 


CD 


"* 


to 


CXI 


■* 


to 


CM 


to 


CO 


o 


lO 


© 


lO 


lO 


© 


CXI 


© 




o- 


© 


■>* 


■* 


-<*< 


CO 


t— 


C0_ 


© 


t^ 


CO 


■* 


CO 


■* 


^ 


CO 


CO 


■* 








cxf 


■*" 


<m" 














CM 


"^ 






o 


.© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 




o 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


e 


o 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


o 
en 

i-l 






























*# 


o 


■* 


© 


<M 


CD 


00 


■* 


to 


© 


CO 


CD 


(M 


■>* 


© 


o 


tO 


lO 






T-H 


CO 


© 


oo 


© 


© 


CO 


© 


t- 


CO 


CO 


co_ 


CO 


CO 


1 


1 




1— 1 


© 


© 


© 


T-H 






co" 


CO* 


^ 


^ 






1 








T* 


T-H 






o 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 




o 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


en 


o 


o 


© 


© 


o 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


tf> 
00 






























OO 




lO 


T— i 




© 


© 


to 


"*l 


to 


"# 


o 


CO 


CO 


00 


oo 


© 


CO 




© 




CO 


© 




© 


CM 


Ir- 


© 


CO, 


eo 


CO 


to_ 


lO 






1 




T-H 


CO 


CM 


as 






c<r 


** 


■*" 


Co" 








1 
















o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


o 


© 


© 


o 


© 




o 


© 


© 


© 


o 


© 


© 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


oo 


o 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


©_ 


© 


© 


en 

00 






























OO 


CM 


■"* 


© 


CD 


© 




l^ 


© 


© 


CD 


© 


© 


t— 


CO 


CXI 


© 


CO 


■* 


CO 


CO 


© 


CD 


CO 


oo 


© 


to 


l> 


© 


o 


© 


O0 


(M 


»o 


CN1 




CO 




© 


t~- 


■* 


!>. 


































1-1 


CO 


co 


1-1 


1-1 






* H 




rt 


TH 


1-1 


rt 






o 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 




o 


o 


© 


© 


O 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


o 


© 


© 


© 


e- 


o 


o 


© 


© 


© 


o 


© 


o 


© 


© 


o 


© 


© 


© 


en 

CO 






























lO 


t~ 


lO 


lO 


iO 


<M 


00 




cxi 


-# 


© 


># 




-* 


•* 


CD 


© 






© 


to 


© 


oo 


© 


© 


O0 


© 


CD 


O0 


© 


tO_ 


lO_ 


OS 


© 


© 


to 


T-H 




© 


to 


© 


to 






~ 


co" 


^" 
















~ 








o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


o 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


o 


© 




o 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


to 


o 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


en 

00 

i-l 






























■* 


CO 


tO 


Tt< 


© 


© 


to 


t^. 


oo 


CM 


© 


t^ 


© 


T*l 


oo 


!>• 


CO 


© 


© 


© 


© 


to 


oo 


© 


tO 


to 






© 


CO 


oo 


■^1 


CO 


CO 






CO 


to 


© 


© 


© 


CO 




** 


Cxf 


CO 


~ 


















"■*" 






© 


O 


© 


© 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 




o 


o 


© 


©1 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


iti 


o 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


'© 


© 


© 


© 


© 
































en 

00 


Tt< 




© 


tO 


CO 


*# 




© 


© 


© 


t^ 


CM 


CM 


© 


co 


TfH 






CO 


t~- 


CO 


CXI 


CO 


t-~ 


t>. 


CO 


to 


CD 




o 


to 


co" 




© 


~ 


CM 


cxi 




co_ 


cxf 


«>•_ 


-- 


■* 




o 


o 


© 


o 


o 


© 


© 


© 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 




© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


o 


^ 


o 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


o 


© 


o 


© 






























en 


CO 




oo 


© 


© 


© 




© 


o 


-* 


© 


CD 


© 


CD 


00 


© 


en 


CO 


-*l 


TH 




CO 


© 


to 


t>. 


co 




tr— 


to 


i-i 


CO 


© 


co 
co 


CO 


00 


"* 




(M 




CO 


00 


l> 


tr- 


CO 




o 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


o 


© 


© 


© 




o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


CO 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 
































en 


"* 


CXI 


in 


IC 


CO 


© 


O0 




O0 


CXI 


© 


CO 


b- 


r>- 


00 

iH 


CO 


t* 


■* 


<M 


oo 


•"#< 


to 


O0 


o 


cxi 




© 


CO 


CO 


m< 


lO 


CO 


l-H 


CO 


T}< 


T— 1 


T-H 




cxi 


CO 


!>. 


o 


CM 






~ 


co" 


c-f 


of 
















~ 






o 


© 


O 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 




o 


o 


o 


© 


© 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


M 


o 


© 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


o 


o 


© 


© 


en 






























o 


CO 


tO 




© 


oo 


■* 


© 


© 


CD 


t~ 


to 




t- 


00 


t- 


^H 


to 


t^ 


to 


CN1 




00 


CXI 


CM 


© 


CO 


00 


CM 


iH 


00 


© 


© 


00 


e<^ 


^*< 


SX| 


CM 


cxi 




© 


*# 


t^ 


CO 




o 


O 


© 


© 


© 


© 


o 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 




o 


© 


© 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 




o 


© 


© 


© 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


o 
































en 


00 


CO 


CO 


r^ 


CO 


CO 


© 


CO 


CO 


© 


to 


-**< 


to 


© 


00 




00 


to 


© 


00 




■* 


© 


© 




© 


■* 




co 


i-i 


© 
co" 


co" 


•*" 


CO 


lO 


Tt< 






CXI 


CXI 


CO 


to 


CO. 


CM 




o 


© 


© 


© 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


o 


© 


© 




o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


o 


© 


© 


o 


© 


© 


© 


©_ 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 






























en 


■■* 


© 


CO* 


IC 


CO 


00 


l-^ 


cxi 


1^ 


CM 


to 


co 


to 


b- 


00 


to 


CM 


Tt* 


t^ 


CO 


CO 


© 


CO 


to 


t>. 




© 


CO 


TtH 


i-i 


CXI 


lO 


CD 


00 


CO 


lO 




T-H 


Tin 


CM_ 


CM 


© 


CNJ_ 


t- 




~ 


- 1 


CO 


^ 


"- 1 










Cxf 


1— 1 




^ 






o 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


o 


© 


© 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 




o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


o 


© 


© 


© 


en 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 
































oo 


CM 


CO 


oo 


© 


© 


CO 




cxi 


CO 


© 






CO 


■* 


00 


O0 


© 


CO 




00 


lO 


CO 


CO 


cxi 


CO 


Tf 


*# 


CO 


■<*! 


iH 


r- 




CO 


•* 


00 


© 


© 


■«*! 


oo 


CXI 


© 


CM 


CO 


C5 


































cxi 


rH 


7-1 


^ 








1-1 




rt 


*" H 


CXI 


'~ l 






o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 




o 


o 


© 


o 


© 


o 


© 


© 


© 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


00 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


o 


© 


o 


© 
































00 


CO 


o 


00 


no 


<M 




r>- 


© 


to 


© 


oo 


CO 


t- 


CO 


00 


lO 


tO 


CO 


■*! 


CO 


cxi 




t^ 


to 


© 


to 


^H 


o> 


to 


iH 


© 


© 


CO 


© 


© 


■* 




CO 




© 


t^ 


© 


CD 


© 


































rt 


rH 


-co 


CN1 


1-1 








1-1 


,-H 


CXI 


CO 


^ 




W 




























73 


H 




























02 


S5 


























oT 


<£,£ 


O 


















i-T 




(h 


• 


bfl 


< 


3 


i-s 




o 

2 


a 

< 


>> 




>-9 


+3 

to 

< 


£ 
a 

CD 

02 


u 

<D 

o 

+3 

o 


s 

> 
o 


B 

CD 

o 

Q 


03 

u 

> 

< 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



135 



CD 



o 

a 
o 

U 









e 

en 



<id 



C3 



-52 



£ 






>H 



GO 

6 

.-3 



£ -!2 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


o 


© 


© 


<S ros; 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


s-2 


© 


©_ 


© 


© 


© 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 
































IO 


© 


|>T 


© 


*a 


CO 


CNI 


m 


© 


CO 


CM 


CO 


lO 


CO 


00 


t^. 


CO 




t- 


t^ 


lO 


<M 


<M 


CM 


CO 


t^ 


C3 


t» 




CO 


t^ 


© 


© 


■* 




<M 


CN 


** 


r~ 


© 


© 


CO 


§ s 


- 1 


*H 


CM 


CNI 


"■« 






















o 


© 


© 


© 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


o 




© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


o 


© 


© 


© 


** 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 
































CO 


© 


© 


CO 


© 


o 


t^. 


CO 


uo 


C5 


t~ 


© 


CM 


© 


o 


© 


CN1 


lO 


iO 




© 


u0 


CO 


lO 


© 


lO 


!>• 


CM 


© 


© 


© 


eo_ 


lO 






▼—1 


1 


1 




CM 


t>- 








~ 


CO 


c^" 


■** 








1 


1 












o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


o 


o 


© 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 




o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


CO 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


































■>*" 


© 


c<r 


»>r 


© 


evi 


■* 


O0 


"* 


© 


CM 


CO 


© 


-# 


no 


© 


CO 


CO 


"# 


co 


lO 


00 


GO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


00 


© 


t^- 


© 


e-» 


CO 


i-H 


1 


1 




-* 


Tfl 


t~ 


r~ 


y—i 




rt " 




cm" 


n 






1 


1 
















o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 




o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


C4 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 
































GO 


t>T 


CM 


l-O 


t^ 


CO 


r^ 


© 


GO 


■"* 


lO 


•«* 


© 


CD 


CM 


© 


© 


CO 


-* 


■* 


t^ 


CN 


CM 




CO 


C5 


t>. 


CM 


!>• 




©_ 


*! 


■* 


i-H 


1 




I 


| 


*H 


-* 


t~ 








~* 


co" 


c<r 


^~ 




i 


1 


1 














o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


o 


© 


© 


© 




© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


1-4 


o 


© 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


. © 


iH 
O 






























© 


© 


■"*! 


CO 


CO 


CO 


■**! 


© 


CO 


© 


CO 


CO 


■* 






© 


-<* 


<M 








<M 


t^ 


©p 


© 


© 




no 


no 


i>- 




"* 


CO 


CNI 


| 






CM 


lO 


© 


UO 


t-H 








** 


■** 
























o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


o 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 




© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


o 


© 


o 


© 


© 


© 


O 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


o 


iH 
0> 






























© 


© 


-* 


t^ 


i>r 


CO 


CN 


CO 


lO 




CO 




© 


© 


© 


-* 


no 


CO 


t~ 




© 


o. 




O 


r^ 


CM 


t- 


CM 


># 


00 


© 


© 


CNI 


UO 


T 7 I 






| 


t-H 


CM 


no 






** 


T-H 


** 








1 


















© 


© 


© 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 




© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


o 


© 


© 


© 


0) 


© 


© 


o_ 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


o 


O 






























cm 


CD 


■* 




"# 


© 




«0 


© 




CM 


CO 


uo 


© 


© 


00 


CO 


<M 


© 


CO 


CNI 


■"** 


T* 


"? 


CO 


© 


CM 


■* 


CO 


°i 


l>^ 


!>;_ 


© 


<r<i 


1 


T 


iH 


| 




CM 


© 








cm 


•** 


~ 


~ 




1 


1 
















© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 




© 


© 


o 


© 


© 


© 


O 


© 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


00 


© 


© 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


o 
0> 

iH 






























no 


CO 


t^ 


t- 


CO 


**i 


■* 


CNI 


CM 


t^ 




© 


tH 


"* 


CM 


CO 


lO 




■* 


© 




© 


GO 


■* 


t^ 


CO 


OS 


-* 


© 


no 


(M 


^-H 


© 


T— 1 




i-H 


1 






T-H 


CO 






^ 


^ 


<M 


^ 


^ 








1 














© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 

© 
© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 




o 


© 


© 


©) 


© 


© 


© 


O 


© 


o 


© 


o 


© 


t- 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


o 

T-l 
















© 
















"■* 


CO 


r^ 


CO 




© 






CO 


CM 


© 




no 


CM 


lO 


© 


CO 


CO 




•># 


-# 


© 


CO 


T-H 


t- 


co_ 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


l>. 




I 


lO 


t^. 


© 


© 


© 


"* 




-*" 




** 


rt ~ 








1 






*-< 


cm" 


^* 






© 


© 


© 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


o 


© 


© 


© 




© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


o 


co 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


o 


o 






























CO 




C5 


©1 


© 


f~ 


CO 


© 


© 




CO 


© 


© 




CM 


■HH 


o 


"* 


UO 


© 


© 


GO 




© 


CO 


lO 


CO 


-* 


t-H 


© 


■>* 


OS 


© 


t^ 


CO 


y— I 




CO 


TtH 


© 


00 


CO 




— ' 


rt 


(M 


^ 


'-' 






















o 


© 


o 


o 


© 


C5 


© 


O 


© 


© 


o 


© 


o 


o 




© 


© 


o 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


o 


© 


o 


© 


© 


© 


to 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


o 


o 


e 

i-H 






























© 


© 


t^ 


CO 


t~- 


t^ 


1>- 


•** 


CO 


CO 


Oi 


tr^ 


»C 


CO 




CO 


©■ 


-<*l 


© 


CO 


t^ 




*# 


UO 


t^ 


CO 


CCi 


o 


T| i 


CO 


■^1 


CO 


(M 


■* 


T— I 


T-H 


CM 


tH 


CM 


CO 


t~ 


"* 




1-* 




<m" 


^ _ 










rt " 














© 


© 


© 


o 


© 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 




© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


o 


© 


TH 


© 


© 


© 


o_ 


O 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


o 
0) 

tj-4 






























t~ 


CM 


© 


■* 


U0 


© 


05 


© 


t^- 




© 


© 




00 


t^ 


00 


C5 


©> 


■«* 




CO 


t~- 


05 


© 


GO 


CO 


CO 


CM 


M< 


CO 


© 


e^ 


t»^ 


•* 




t-H 


CO 


T-H 


CM 


CM 


© 


CM 








oi 


eo 


~ 






















© 


© 


© 


© 


o 


© 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 




o 


© 


© 


© 


o 


© 


© 


O 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


CO 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


e 
0> 






























CO 


© 


•HH 






t^ 


»o 


t~ 


© 


CM 


CO 


cm" 


© 


GO 


CO 


r-» 


lO 


© 


«0 


CO 


"*■ 


o 


CO 


© 


CO 


CO 


© 


CO 




t^ 


CM 

cm" 


"^1 

co" 




CO 


© 


-HH 


CO 


"■ 


-* 


CO 


m 




CO 




o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 




© 


o 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


CM 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


o 


© 


o 


O 


© 


© 


© 


© 


o 






























CO 


-# 


1© 


in 


CO 


CO 


© 


U0 


CO 


CO 


■•*< 


© 


© 




© 


t~- 


© 


CO 


Tf< 


o 


CO 


CO 


t^ 


© 


-*< 


i> 


-f 


t-~ 


t- 


CO 


■^ 


CO 


t^ 


CO 




^■H 


i-H 


uo 


Ttl 


t~- 




CM 




~ 


T-H 


-* 


rt " 
















*■< 


»*" 








• 


• 


• 






• 


. 


. 






■ 




'co 

CO • 

.2 

't-> 


a 




























T3 


Eh 




























CO 


z 


























CD 


m -3 


o 


















i-T 




(_* 


- 


bfl 


S 9 


IpH 


















CD 




CD 


.a 

a 

CD 
O 
CD 

Q 


C3 


« 


n 

3 

3 


>> 

U 

3 

3 
u 
XI 
a 




< 


93 


a 

3 


'r-1 

>-5 


CO 

3 
bfl 
3 
< 


J2 

3 

a> 


(J" 
Si 

s 

a 

O 


Xi 

3 

> 
o 

55 


U 

CD 


u O 

£3 

< 



3 

1 ©■ g 

— oo g 



no 



3 u 

CD CD 



C3 ^h 

A^- H ^ Q 

00 CD > .— 

^ a «_, >> 

no O = 



o CD ro 
£ ^ CD 



<u CO 



CO 

3 

2 "CD 

C3 ^t 1 o 

_QJ 00 CD 



O 

-3 a 



> 
o 

3 ^P 



CD CO 3 



O fe r3 

• Qi 
"S3 

3 © .- 

CD 

£ co -73 

. - o 

5 oo j 



a oo 



© 



a .3 S 





-(j 











3 


3 


^4 




hi) 


o 




crt 




r 


CJ 


CD 


CD 






!h 




>> 




3 
3 


CD 

a 


m 


CO 

3 


'3 


o 




CD 


O 


> 


5 


CO 


3 


> 


CD 


ed 


_ 


+s 


CD 


'ii 



« 2 

CO h 

t! 3 © 

s . ^ 

^ ^ - 

o o 3 

-tf o +» 

* S ^ 

-§ CO O 

o a o 

3 •*" w 

"H co _, 

co *h -3 

S t o 

CD oo +3 



b S 

IH O 

a 3 

co t£ 

O -3 

^ 2 

+= co 
3^ 

|^ 

® 3 

2 2 

3 «*H 

CO CD 



o 



CO cj o 00 CD 



bD '3 

CO -3 

I* 



4^ „ H <M 



"3 
3 

a 

a 

CO 



68 SR 

CD CD 

>i *-»3 



| 8*3 



-3 

W >, CO 

3 -Q CD 

b. cd co 

P- co 3 

k. CO CD 

>*> CD +J 

b >h x 

3 o S 

■BhJ 

CO ^ rt 

CD 3 cJ 

-a g o 

+s 3 cj 

-s £ o 

ai 3 n 

CO « 

2 n -5 

•H "^ "S 

3 rt 

CO If 



3 .3 



"° "S 

3 a 

to CD 

>> c^ 

" CD 

s 3 

CD W 

-3 CD 



^'^ 



136 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



1— I 



(^ 

e 

CO 

© 

5q 



©■ ^ 



"5* 


03 


3 




© 


Tt< 


i~o 




^ 


00 



© 


R 


•<S> 


o3 


CO 


T3 


•c«3 


<u 


rs 


> 




O 


CQ 


S3 



■to 
© 

© 

©• 



6 

< 



1 - 


3T5 


o 


CM 




CM 


CO 


"* 


o 


CO 


o 


OS 


CO 




© 






So|| . 


























1 






CM 


CO 


© 




o 


r~ 


in 


o 


Tjl 


CM 


CM 


r>- 


© 






S ea A 9 


lO 


m 


CM 


OS 


o 


CM 














m 




c3§>"Js 


















1 














nfall 
scted 
hes). 


w 


CO 


W 


CO 




t^ 


oo 


»n 


o 


CO 


■^H 


•<*! 


_ 






CO 


o 


© 


1^ 


CO 


•* 


00 


CO 


CM 


-* 


CO 


CO 


CM 






t^ 


© 


in 


■* 


o 


lO 


m 


-* 


o 


CM 


CO 


CD 


CO 






o3S a 


r— 1 


i-H 


in 


■<* 


CO 


o 


o 


o 


CO 


o 


o 


o 


© 






















1 














Qj Oh- 1 


















1 














31 


O 


00 


CO 






o 


CM 


o 


m 


00 


t^ 


OS 


■* 






■* 


lO 


CO 


OS 


o 


o 


OS 


in 


T_l 


oo 


OS 


00 


lO 






c t3 


CO 


CO 


Tjl 


■* 


CO 


CM 


CO 


Tf 


o 


,_ 


CM 


CO 


oo 






..H O 


























CO 






o| P! 
































tffl 




































2 nd 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


1 o 






'3 a; 

l^lH IB 


o 


o 


o 


c 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 






o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


© 




































CO 


© 


t^ 


CO 


lO 


1^ 


oo 


TtH 


o 


CO 


o 


in 


© 






o f - 1 




CM 


O0 


CO 


"* 


o 


Tt< 


00 


00 




CO 


CO 


CO 






73 ^ 

03 -|-3 


c~ 





CO 


CM 


OS 


lO 


00 


CO 


CM 


00 


OS 


in 


CD 




































•S 03 


t^ 


00 




CM 


M< 


•«*< 


m 


OO 




■* 


CM 


o 










o 


CM 


•># 


oo 


00 


co 


CO 


CM 


1 




CM 


•* 


© 






~ 


~ 


CO 


CM 


" 








1 


















1 


1 


1 


o 


1 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


1 o 
















o 




o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 
















o 




o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


© 


© 








73 


































CO 








f 




t^ 


o 


o 


CO 


00 


r~ 


t>r 


CM 








o 








■>* 




o 


CM 


o 


OS 


■«*• 


OS 


OS 


CM 








l-q 








o 




OS 


>n. 


co 


CO 


CO 


oo 


T« 


o 
















































lO 




OS 




00 


OS 


OS 


■* 


CM 


OS 






W 














OS 


t^ 


m 




o 


CD 


■* 








O 




















T_l 


rt 












< 
































































o 




o 


o 


o 


1 


o 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 1 








o 


CO 


o 




o 






















CQ 


.9 


© 


© 


© 




o_ 
























■■# 


as" 


•* 




■«* 
























'3 


t^ 


t^ 


© 




00 
























o 


CO 


© 


CO 
© 
CM 




00 
i«" 




















P 
































































„fl 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


© 


1 o 






CD_ct3 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


CO 


o 


o 


o 


© 




ft 


pag 
oug 
Nor 
ike. 


o 


© 


© 


o 


o_ 


o 


o 


o 


CO 


o 


C5_ 


©_ 


o 




H 


i>r 


CO 


OO 


o 


o 


o" 


rj 


Os" 


CO 


00 


o 


©" 


00 




Pi 


t^ 


© 


in 


o 


o 


o 


tr- 


CM 


o 


m 


CM 


© 










00 


oo 


© 


o 


o 


o 


OS 


OS 


OS 


oo 


00 


00 


OS 




o 


+3 






























hi 
































< 
































Wasted into 

River 
below Darn. 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


© 


1 o 






© 


o 


o 


o 


CO 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


© 


© 






o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


© 




































id 


m 




t^ 


o 


CO 


•>* 


CM 


CO 


o 


r~ 


m 


in 






W 


CM 


t^ 


»o 


o 


oo 


00 


CO 


OS 


OS 


co 


co 








lO 


°i 


I>^ 


CO 


lO 


OS_ 


CO 


•* 


■* 


CO 


'-J. 


in 


-* 






c<r 


cm 


oo" 


o 


CM* 


co" 


CO 


co" 


CO 


CO 


CO 


co" 


CO 












co 


CO 
















CO 












CM 


7—1 




















H 
































ived 
City 
ceste 
shed 


1 


o 


o 


o 


c 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


© 


1 © 








o 


d 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


© 


© 








o 


o 


o 


o 


o_ 


o_ 


CO 


o 


o 


o_ 


© 


© 








CO 


oi" 


i~-T 


oT 


I>r 


o 


Os" 


t~-T 


CO 


CO 


"* 


<*" 






«) ^ h h 




■>* 


CO 


OS 


CO 


O0 


o 


o 


m 


o 


o 


© 


CO 






Rec 

from 

of Wo 

Wate 




CO 


CM 


CD 


co 


CM 




CO__ 


t~ 


CO 


in 


■* 


CM 










CO 


^* 


Os" 




^H* 


cm" 










co 










OJ 


CM 






















_ 
































charged 
into 
chusett 
ueduct. 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o - 


o 


o 


© 


1 © 






o 


© 


o 


o 


CO 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


CO 


o 






© 


CO 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


© 


© 




































©" 


in 


CO 


«>r 


o 


t>r 


CO 


CM 


1>- 


CO 


o 




00 








t^ 


o 




o 






CO 


1>- 




Tfl 


t>- 


© 






OS 


CO 


o 


co 


CM 


t-- 


00 


CM 


■^1 


CM 


CO 


© 


CD 






.2 ►« cr 

P ^<J 


CO 


co 


O0 


o 


in 


c* 


CO 


in 


"* 


o 


"* 


Gi 


cm" 






o 


t~ 


i-O 


OS 


CO 


CM 


o 


O0 


£ 


CM 


00 


t^ 


OS 










- 






















03 






h 


























<s 






z 
































o 


























u 






§ 


















^r 




fS 




o 
o 








>> 


>> 

f-l 














CD 

a 

0) 
-h> 

a 

CQ 


f-T 


as 

a 

CD 

> 

o 


CD 

-O 


— " 03 

—> CD 










u 

c3 

a 

c3 


S3 


o 
s- 
03 


a 

< 


>> 

03 


CD 

3 

1-5 


i-s 


CO 

B 

< 


^2 

o 
u 

o 


a 

CD 

a 

CD 

p 


o > 





J2 . 

CM fM 

o "3 

►* CO 

a CD 

CO — i 

CD ^ 

-a a 

* "2 

o a 

<« o3 

§ a 

03 •- 

£ °3 

fi '3 

I s 

73 CD 

>,& 

o3 4j 

'O -h> 

. CD 

cd a 

to o 



.3 o3 

a od 

75 M 

3 M 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



137 



G3 



°* II 

CD 



53 as 



^3 


,_, 


C3 


c© 

CO 


co 


s 


CSi 


M 


f-H 


*. 




o 


T) 


^^ 


fl 


^J 


as 


^ 


• « 


5~. 


QQ 


<» 








J JO 



Percent- 
age of 
Rain- 
fall col- 
lected. 


CM 


OS 
OS 


1— 1 

CO 


CO 




OS 


O 


lO 

IO 


CO 



00 


CO 
CO 


CO 


as 

CM 


1 °. 

CO 


-* 


CO 


1-1 


t- 


CO 








1 


1 




T-H 


■* 




1 <rs 

S 8 <» 2 


OS 


LO 


•* 


^_, 


in 


00 


O 


t^ 


■* 


10 


CO 


CO 


■* 






(M 





CO 


CO 





OS 


t^ 


CO 





CO 


-* 


CM 




CD 


CO 


■* 





t^ 





"I 


CM 


CM 


*-[ 


""' 


■>* 


CM 




^ 


^ 


10 


■* 


CM 





O 


O 


O 
| 








O 


CO 




<*H H- 1 






























3 — 1 O 


10 


r~ 


t^ 





00 





■>* 


CM 


C5 





CO 


CO 


,_, 




00 





«o 


*— ' 


O 


OS 


■* 


CO 


CM 


CO 


10 


TJH 


t^ 




'3 ^0 


CO 


-<*i 


"* 


IO 


CO 


rH 


CO 


CO 


O 


T-H 


CM 


CO 


CO 




>— 1 
































































O 

















s 





O 
O 


O 


O 












O 




















O 


O 










-oi . 


O 


o_ 




















O 


CD 


O 


o_ 







gas's 






-* 





00 








CO 


I>~ 


IO 


I>" 


■>* 


T— t 




r^ 


CO 


t^ 


CO 


■* 


■>* 


T— t 





00 


CO 


CM 


as 


OS 




°1 


CO 


I>^ 


°l 


IO 


CO 





l> 




TH 


co_ 


t^ 







CO 


"5 


t>r 


CO 


CO 




00* 


^ 


CD 


rh 


i>r 


00 


00* 




CO 


t^ 


CM 


r~ 












1 




i-H 


10 










CNI 


1-1 


1-1 








1 
















1 


O 


I 


1 





1 








O 


1 





O 


1 










O 

















O 







O 













O 

















O 







O 









































m 




CO 






t^ 









CO 




CO 


■* 


■* 






O 




*# 






OS 




T— 1 


l> 


CM 




CO 


as 


CD 






h] 




C5 






00 






IO 


O 




as 


CM 


-* 


































H 






t^ 












"* 


00 




CM 


■<*< 


i-H 




O 






CO 






T^ 






1 — 1 






1 — 1 


i-H 


































































O 







1 








1 





1 


1 




O 


1 


1 


1 1 






























O 










a 










o_ 













O 












CN 







i>r 













10 












'c3 


■* 




CO 


IO 




CO 








CO 












O 


CO 




CO 


'"l 




00 








iO 












CO 




CO 


OS 




CO 








oT 


















■«* 






" 


















O | 


























CD 





O 


O 


1 O 







a 




















CD 





O 


O 


O 




























CD 


o_ 


O 


CD 


CD_ 




•P " 


to 


•* 


CO 


>o 


CO 


10 


CO 


CO 


0" 


■* 


CD 


CO 




Vo 


CM 


-CO 


CO 


-* 


■>* 


10 




t^ 







OS 


t^ 




°i 


°i 


""l 


CO 


T "i 





10 


CO 


O0 


10 


•<* 


CM 


CM 







CO 


05 






■* 


-* 


IO 


1— 1 




iO 


t>T 


CM* 




o3.S 


tl 


CO 


CM 


10 


05 
















■* 




£tf 






1—1 


T-1 




















1 S'd oT 





O 




















O 





O 





1 O 


A 


j£ O CD jh 





O 


CD 











CD 





O 


CD 


O 





O 





O 














O 





O 


O 


CD 





CD 




n"" £ £ 6 




























« 




O 


■>* 


CO 





"■# 


O0 


•* 


CO 


■<*! 


CD 


CD 


«* 


00 




en 


r~ 





t- 


CO 


CO 


CO 


O0 


CM 




OS 


H 
ft 

a! 


CO 


10 


(M 


CM 




CM 


a 


OO 


CO 


CO 


t^ 


00 


00 


CM 

i-H 


O 






























■S^S . 





O 








O 





O 








O 


O 


O 


1 O 





O 








O 





CD 








O 


CD 


O 


CD 


O 






CO 


O 
CO 








O 




CO 


CD 
CM 


CD 
CO 


CD 


O 


CD 
CO 


O 


CD 
l>* 




CO 


CO 


t^ 


CO 


t^ 


CO 


■<*! 





•<*• 


CM 


CM 


as 


O 




OS 





00 


t-~ 


t^ 


00 


t^ 


!>• 


t^ 


t^ 


l>- 


t^ 


00 






^r 


























££* 




























T3 +5 














O 





O 


O 





O 


O 





1 




. 0) rt fl 5 

ft mm § 3 

■S S 3 -PT3 

cs_a oSffl 














O 





O 


O 





O 


O 


CD 









cm 




CO 













CD 
CM 


CM 




CO 


CD 


CO 


CD 
00 


CD 
CO 




<M 


CO 


in 


10 


C35 


00 


IO 


iO 


10 


00 


»*l 


t-- 


■* 




fe;o ftt£ 3 


CM 


•^ 


-CM 


t^ 


t~ 


1— 1 


•<*! 


fH 


CM 


CO 




■<*< 


co 




O 


CO 


!>. 


CO 


r^ 


00 


r^ 


t^ 


t^ 


t~ 


t^. 


t^ 


t-^ 






CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 




^ K.-P 




















O 


O 














1 




CD j3 >> 























O 



















> S-2 3 o* 





o_ 

















O 


CO 


CD 


o_ 


o_ 


o_ 




cs" 


CO 


«o 


t^" 


00 


t>r 


CO 


t-" 


t^r 


cn 





0" 


06" 




<M 


-* 


10 


10 


■<* 


-* 


CM 


CO 


CM 




■* 





OS 




co 


CO 




CO 


t^ 


°l 


CD_ 
00 


CO 


"■* 


CO 

IO 


CO 
CD 


CO 

»o 


00 

as" 




g^CQ^tj 


CO 


CO 


t^ 


CO 


CO 


t- 


CO 


CO 


t> 


co 


CO 


CO 


co 




4^ > R 3 > 


O 























O 











1 




O 












8 























O 











0. 


CD 





O 
















0? 


CO 


CO 





CO 


t>r 


CD 


IO 


CO 


c£ 


CO 


l>* 


CD 






CM 


cs> 


CM 


CO 




CM 


CN 


rt< 


CO 




IO 


00 


CM 




t*» 


-# 


CO 


■* 





iO 


CO 


o_ 


CO 


CD 


•"1 


00 


■* 




"^ CD 03 CD 


CO 


CO 


t>r 





10 


oT 


CO 


IO 


•* 





-<t< 


00 


CM 




* £tf 





t- 


«o 


as 


CO 


CM 





00 




CM 


00 


t--. 


as 




1 " H 


















*™ ' 


































































as 






























a> 






























>> 




w 






























1 






u 
rt 
9 

a 
a 


u 
a 

u 

9 

to 



E 


"u 

a 




a 

•-5 


i-5 


3 

3 


u 

CU 

a 

a 

CD 
CO 


h 
O 

5 

O 


a 




u 
a> 
JO 

a 

V 

p 


u 
O > 

H < 



M 

3 

O 



3 

cu 

3 

< 






o « 
3 



138 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



>-H 

p»o 

I 

"ts 

S 
■*o 

^2 



£ I 



o 


CI) 




M 


CO 

•to 


ji. 


^ 


c 


MO 


© 




rd 








\-K 




© 




+J 




03 



CQ 



53 

HO 

o 
© 



o 

m 
< 



<l..":=H 






























O ff> H K 


'- , 


CO 


CO 

to 


00 

to 


o 




o 

o 


to 
to 


1-H 

CO 


o 

CM 


us 


00 


to 
1 

1^ 


Per 

agi 
Rai 
co Ik 


"5 


■<*! 


CM 


t^ 


C5 


^H 


^-H 




1 








Tt( 




~T3-^ 






























o3 © £ 
d o,d 


O 


o 


t--. 


00 


lO 


■* 


CM 


rH 


to 


CO 


«3 


eo 


US 




00 


t-i 


US 


r^ 


U5 


CM 


CO 


CM 


1—1 


o 


CO 


to 


o 




cf= a 


^ 


1— ( 


lO 


CO 


CM 


o 


o 


o 


o 
1 


o 


o 


o 


T— 1 






















1 












-3^. 






























tS © 


CO 


^H 


1—1 


CO 


t-H 


03 


l-~ 


CM 


!>• 


OS 


IC 


00 


to 




lO 


,_ < 


<# 


OS 


t>. 


US 


I—* 


to 


CM 


to 


•>* 


CO 


00 




•2 § 

a d 


eo 


Tt* 


" 


«* 


CM- 


T— 1 


CO 


CO 


o 




CM 


CO 


us 

CO 




2 TJ 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


1 o 




r* 1 14_ to 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 




o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 
































o 


■<*< 


t>. 


o 


o 


t^ 


CM 




t^ 


Oi 


CO 


tH 


CM 




— o is 


OS 


o 


O0 


TtH 


OS 


IC 


CO 


to 


t>- 


CO 


CM 


to 


t^ 




^3 © 

TO +2 


t^ 


US 


00 


lO 


o 


■>* 




CO 


to 


CO 


to 




CM 
































■£ 3 


r~ 


00 


■* 


oo 


io 


cm" 


CO 


CM 






CO 


to 


■* 




r° > 






us 


CO 


fM 








1 












H ^ 


















1 
















o 


o 


1 


1 


1 


1 


o 


1 


o 


o 


o 


o 


I o 








o 


o 










o 




o 


o 


o 


o 


o 








o 


o 










o 




o 


o 


o 


o 


o 






































to 


■* 


CM 










a> 




o 


t^ 


t- 


o 


oo 






o 


OS 


CO 










CM 




■* 


l-~ 


CO 




o 






h~l 


i-H 


to 

US 










CM 




i-H 
CM 




to 
to" 


CM_ 

-#" 


US 




H 

































































« 

o 

05 






























































1 


1 


o 


o 


o 


o 


1 


o 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 1 










o 


o 


o 


o 




o 




















o 


o 


o 


o 




o 
















_d 




































■"SI 


t^ 


lO 


t^ 




















'5 






t>; 


■>* 


CO 


00 




to 























U5 

-*" 


oo_ 

CO" 


co" 


y— 1 




Tt< 












< 






























































+= Ih 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


1 




o 


o 


1 o 


pj 


U * ° ■ 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 






o 


o 


o 




o 


o 


©_ 


o 


o 


o_ 


o_ 


o 






o 


o_ 


o_ 


Wate 
wasted 
Outlet 

Lake 


to" 


oo" 


oo" 


t--T 


o 


o" 


to" 


T— 1 






o 


o" 










■«*< 


lO 




CM 


CM 


o 






CM 


o 


■^ 




to_ 


CO 


eo_ 
to" 


o" 


o" 


US 


CM* 


CO 








o 
o" 


CM_ 

to" 


O 


CO 


CO 


*# 


"* 


(M 












































































O 


1 HtJ W 


o 


o 


o 


O 


O 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


1 o 




"3 o © Jh 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 




T3 tiri J) 


© 


o 


© 


o_ 


o_ 


o_ 


o 


o_ 


o 


o_ 


o_ 


o 


o 




Water 

verted i 

Waters 

by Sew 

etc. 


cm" 


oo" 


to" 


co" 


us 


o 


US 


o> 


CO* 


to" 


o~ 


^ 


co" 




•* 




CM 


(M 


"& 


US 


CO 


CO 


to 




CO 


t^ 


I>- 




:>. 


CO 


CO_ 


CNl" 


oo_ 


t-- 


to 


US 


-<* 


•*! 


•<* 


CO 


O0 




"S-S-p 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 1 




. OJ ra c 






























© £?M 3 d 






























Wa 

dischi 

thro 

Cochi 

Aque 
































rt< 


1 


^ 


t^ 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 o 






t^ 




o 


00 


















o 




eo 

<m" 




eo_ 


to 
























^ 
























co 

CO 




























cm" 




u W»2 






























w 


- 
























u 

03 




H 


























© 




fc 






























c 


























u 




s 


















u 




f* 




o 
© 

bJD 








>> 
u 

03 

d 
d 

03 

1-5 


i-i 
03 

d 
u 

© 


u 
u 
03 


'u 

a 
< 


o3 


©" 
d 

d 

1-3 


•-s 


-P 

to 

d 

M 

d 

< 


© 
Si 

a 

© 

a 

© 

111 


© 

o 


© 

s 

© 
> 
o 

55 


© 

B 

© 
© 

p 


Total, 
Avera 



rt 



03 

.d 

bD 

d 



fe 



PE| 



TS 

d 
o 
a 

d 
Q 

d 

03 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



139 



e 



cq 

»S2 



cq 



•c-i 



co 
O 

cq 

© 

e 



O 



CQ 



©• 



^ 



6 
g 

pq 





£m 


Sh 




























BO P 

S3 > 




CO 


I>- 


OS 


CO 


o 


iO 


CO 


CS 


T-H 


t-H 


00 


OS 


CS 


<* 


■* 


o. 


-* 


T-* 


CO 


M 


lO 


CM 


id 


t^ 


o 


00 


rd © 


t>. 


r^ 


00 


«5 


m 


»o 


CO 


— ! 


CD 


tr^ 


'Ctl 


CO 


T-H 


TS^co 


00 


oo 


CO 


OS 


OS 


OS 


OS 


OS 


CS 


00 


O0 


oo 


CO 


c3 0) 


pH 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


^« 






























!-> 




























i'l 




o 


■* 


r^ 


t^ 


lO 


CD 


CD 


^ 


O 


!>• - 


T-H 


UO 


CO 


CO 


CM 


CO 


UO 


CO 


!>. 


lO 


CO 


!>. 


CO 


CO 


Ttl 


CO 


."S o 


i^ 


t^ 


CO 


t^ 


t^ 


t^ 


t^ 


t^ 


I>. 


t^ 


t^ 


t^. 


t^ 


t3^m 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 




5 S" 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 




























fl ." 






























o.a 


to 




























-S o 


10 ^O 




C5 




CO 




t~ 


CO 


1^ 


!>. 


CO 


t^ 


CM 


lO 


.5 > 


00 


>o 


OS 


»o 


■* 


OS 


oo 


CO 


OS 


in 


1—1 


o 


o 


o » 


HHpqeO 


»*l 


■>* 


,— 1 


■^ 


-*l 


■* 


-* 


»# 


•H^ 


*# 


rH 


*# 


■* 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


W« 






























>».& 






























h o 


o 


l> 


Tfl 


CM 


CO 


OS 


CO 


00 


iO 




o 


OS 




s > 


t^ 


o 


t^ 


CM 


oo 


o 


OS 


OS 


o 


00 


CO 


b- 


O0 


T3 © 


— Sci 


00 


C5 


1^ 


OS 


OS 


cs 


OS 


OS 


OS 


CO 


CS 


00 


b- 


"P5 cm 


l« 


lO 


lO 


to 


i« 


lO 


LO 


lO 


U0 


i-O 


U0 


K0 


U0 


3 a> 


CM 


CM 


CM 


CM 


Ol 


CM 


CM 


CM 


CM 


CM 


CM 


CM 


CM 


GG£ 




























































«1 


to . 

to Sh CM 


CO 


OS 


OS 


o 


■>* 


,_( 


o 


1—1 


CO 


CO 


lO 


O 


"* 


T— 1 


t^ 


CM 


00 


r~ 


TtH 


CM 


CM 


CTM 


CS 


OS 


CO 


CO 


3 §^ 


in 


■># 


CM 


■* 


■* 


lO 


HO 


o 


IC 


M< 


-tl 


■* 


■<* 


CM 


CM 


CM 


CM 


CM 


CM 


CM 


CM 


CM 


CM 


CM 


CM 


CM 


CN| 


CM 


CM 


CM 


CM 


CM 


CM 


CM 


CM 


CM 


CM 


CM 


CM 


S 




_i "D ^C 


o 


CO 


Tfl 


CM 


^_, 


,_, 


i _ ( 


■<*< 


CD 


T-H 


OS 


OS 




CO 

6 




o 

CO 


CO 


o 

CO 


CO 


CO 

CO 




O 
"5 


o 

"5 


O 


T-H 


"* 


o 


O 

CO 




00 


CO 


CO 


00 


CO 


00 


OO 


00 


CO 


00 


oo 


00 


00 


00 

a 


































_. w ~," 


CO 


CM 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


OS 


CO 


t>. 


■«*< 


•* 


lO 


00 


(A 


CM 


to g^ 


CO 


t>- 


CM 


>* 


CO 


CM 


T-H 


CM 


T— 1 






OS 


CS 


w 
o 


o 


-2 ^ f- 


t^ 


b- 


CO 


CO 


CO 


t>. 


t^ 


t^ 


!>• 


t^ 


1^ 


uo 


lO 


t^ 


!>. 


t>. 


t>- 


t-- 


I>. 


t^ 


t~ 


t>- 


l>. 


t^ 


l^. 


r^ 
































fc 




_• M ^ - 


o 


OS 


CO 


O0 


■<*< 


CM 


t^ 


o 


tX 


! — | 


CO 


"0 


CD 


M 


iH 


^T3fe 


CO 


Ol 


OS 


H 


CO 


r~ 


CO 


TtH 


CO 


o 




CO 


CD 


En 




tO S_,CM 




























o 


— g 


t^ 


00 


t^ 


00 


00 


i^ 


cs 


OS 


OS 


OS 


OS 


t^ 


t^ 


o 


CO 


CD 


CD 


CO 


CD 


CD 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CD 
































So 


© 


OS 


T— t 


lO 


T— 1 


CM 


CO 


_ 


tH 


OS 


CD 


CO 


OS 


O 


-^ r 


C5 
C5 


o 


OS 
OS 


O 

o 


o 
o 


cs 
OS 


o 


OS 

OS 


OS 
CS 


OS 
OS 


o 
o 


OS 
OS 


o 
o 




OS 


o 


OS 


o 


o 


CS 


o 


OS 


CS 


CS 


o 


OS 


o 


is © 


.IP II 

w 


T-H 


CM 


J— 1 


CM 


CM 


t-H 


c-i 


1— I 


t-H 


T-H 


CM 


T-H 


CM 


« 






























Fh 






























© 






























o 


o 


OS 


OS 


t^ 


CO 


^1 


t~- 


1^ 


CM 




r _l 




43-0 

2 a 


^S 


o 


OS 


lO 


00 


CO 


t^ 


co 


t^ 


OO 


00 


CO 


CS 


U0 






CO 


CM 


CM 


CM 


CO 


CM 


CM 


CM 


CM 


CM 


<M 


CI 


CM 




CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CD 


CD 




1-1 


7—1 


1—1 


r ~ l 


T— 1 


1—1 


1—1 


1—1 


1—1 


1— l 


T - 1 


"—I 


' _l 
































Ih 






























© 
IS 




























• 


CO 


-*< 


CM 


OS 


C-1 


CM 


^1 


,_, 


CO 


00 


CM 


OS 


CD 


S"2 


■>* 


CD 


t-- 


CO 


CO 


>* 


o 


t^ 


U0 




O 


t^ 


CO 


c3 O 




CO 


OO 


00 


oo 


CO 


00 


00 


r^ 


t^ 


t^ 


t^ 


00 






ira 


uO 


lO 


»o 


m 


U0 


lO 


lO 


lO 


>o 


»o 


•o 




.3>n 


T-H 


1—1 


1-1 


7—1 


1-1 


^ H 


1 ~ l 


7-1 


1—1 


T ~ l 


































































© 


0> 


























































^•3 


>°° 


T— 1 


CO 


CO 


C-1 


T— 1 


CM 


t^~ 


T* 


o 


CO 


CM 




CM 


iO 


CI 


CO 


CO 


CO 


<M 


CO 


CO 


■># 






CM 


CO 


































CO 


CO 




CO 


CO 


■>* 


■* 


■<* 


M< 


"* 


•># 


CO 


CM 


o 




■<# 


-* 


"<tl 


~# 


"* 


Tt< 


"* 


Tj( 


>* 


-* 


>* 


"* 


'tl 


.tfl 




























O 


M 


























































tnut 

ill 

rvoir. 


h 
[h eg O 


CM 


Ol 


>o 


o 


CM 


>o 




cs 


00 


•o 


T-H 


1(0 


05 


OS 


00 


OS 


CO 


CO 


^ 


CS 


CD 


t^ 


o 


OS 


00 


CS 


gMg 


IS (H ro 


co 

CO 


CO 


co' 

CO 


co 

CO 


CO 


co 


CO 
CO 


co 

CO 


CO 
CO 


CO 


co' 

CO 


co 

CO 


CO 
CO 


°w" 




















t-H 








o « 
































-t< 


-tl 


•+I 


-tl 


-f 


-* 


«# 


-tl 


-f 


-tl 


-tl 


-tl 


>o 




a 


CS 


OS 


OS 


OS 


OS 


CS 


OS 


CS 


CS 


CS 


OS 


CS 


CS 




Q 


































5 

•-s 


09 


h 

8 


0, 

1\ 


3 




>> 

l-S 


bfi 


43 

a 

02 


4J 

u 

o 


o 


p 


d 

c3 

>-s 



140 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



Table No. 13. — Sources from which and Periods during which Water has been 

drawn for the Supply of the Metropolitan Water District. 

From Wachusett Reservoir into the Wachusett Aqueduct. 



January, 
February, 
March, . 
April, 
May, 
June, 
July, 
August, . 
September, 
October, 
November, 
December, 
Totals, 



Month. 



Number of 

Days during 

which 

Water was 

flowing. 



24 
22 
25 
26 
27 
24 
24 
26 
20 
26 
22 
25 



291 



Actual Time. 



Hours. 



287 
233 
204 
282 
265 
330 
284 
264 
270 
314 
202 
239 



3,179 



Minutes. 



50 



30 
55 
35 

52 
47 
25 
25 
32 



Million 
Gallons 
drawn. 



3,221.2 
2,146.9 
1,798.1 
2,718.5 
2,021.2 
3,891.5 
3,218.2 
2,642.2 
3,434.3 
3,726.7 
2,530.2 
2,451.2 



33,800.2 



Total actual time, 132.50 days. 

Total quantity drawn, 33,800,200,000 gallons. 



From Sudbury Reservoir through the Weston Aqueduct to Weston Reservoir. 



Month. 


Number of 

Days during 

which 

Water was 

flowing. 


Actual Time 
(Hours). 


Million 
Gallons 
drawn. 


January 


31 


744 


1,215.9 


February, 




















28 


672 


1,077.6 


March, . 




















31 


744 


1,161.1 


April, 




















30 


720 


1,102.5 


May, 




















31 


744 


1,171.7 


June, 




















30 


720 


1,145.4 


July, 




















31 


744 


1,161.0 


August, 










. 










31 


744 


1,151.7 


September, 




















30 


720 


1,117.6 


October, 




















31 


744 


1,159.0 


November, 




















30 


720 


1,114.3 


December, 




















31 


744 


1,161.8 


Totals, 


365 


8,760 


13,739.6 



Total actual time, 365 days. 

Total quantity drawn, 13,739,100,000 gallons. 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



141 



Table No. 13 — Concluded. 

From Framingham Reservoir No. 3 through the Sudbury Aqueduct to Chestnut Hill Reservoir. 



Month. 



Number of 

Days during 

which 

Water was 

flowing. 



Actual Time 
(Hours). 



Million 
Gallons 
drawn. 



January, 

February, 

March, . 

April, 

May, 

June, 

July, 

August, 

September, 

October, 

November, 

December, 

Totals, 



31 
28 
31 
30 
31 
30 
30 
31 
30 
31 
30 
31 



365 



744 
672 
744 
720 
744 
720 
744 
744 
720 
744 
712 
744 



8,752 



2,289.5 
2,305.6 
2,021.0 
1,766.1 
1,914.2 
2,158.4 
2,108.7 
2,076.6 
2,142.8 
2,034.2 
1,810.2 
2,033.6 



24,660.9 



Total actual time, 364.33 days. 

Total quantity drawn, 24,660,900,000 gallons. 



Table No. 14. — Average Daily Quantity of Water flowing through Aqueducts in 

1914 by Months. 1 



Month. 


Wachusett 
Aqueduct 

into 
Sudbury 
Reservoir 
(Gallons). 


Weston 

Aqueduct 

into 

Metropolitan 

District 

(Gallons). 


Sudbury 
Aqueduct 
into 
Chestnut Hill 
Reservoir 
(Gallons). 


Cochituate 
Aqueduct 
into 
Chestnut Hill 
Reservoir 
(Gallons). 


January, 
February, 
March, 
April, . 
May, . 
June, . 
July, . 
August, 
September, . 
October, 
November, . 
December, . 












103,729,000 

76,496,000 

57,826,000 

90,430,000 

65,016,000 

129,527,000 

103,620,000 

85,045,000 

114,333,000 

120,019,000 

84,150,000 

78,887,000 


39,223,000 
38,486,000 
37,455,000 
36,750,000 
37,797,000 
38,180,000 
37,452,000 
37,152,000 
37,253,000 
37,387,000 
37,143,000 
37,478,000 


73,855,000 
82,343,000 
65,194,000 
58,870,000 
61,748,000 
71,947,000 
68,023,000 
66,987,000 
71,427,000 
65,619,000 
60,340,000 
65,600,000 


- 


Average, 




92,420,000 


37,643,000 


67,564,000 


- 



1 Not including quantities wasted while cleaning and repairing aqueducts. 



142 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



s- 

<o 



<o 



o 

•c-i 

•<s> 

5V, 

•■S> 

la: 

CO 

CO 

o 

®i 

-S3 
se 
e 



fc 



©> 



8 
© 

o 



SO 



T— I 

6 
< 



•Sui^q 


3rj jo Sui^'Bajj joj 


o 
o 


o 

O 


o 
o 


O 

o 


o 
o 


O 

c 


O 
O 


1 


o 
o 


1 


i 


o 


i 


o 




-siq jaSunu jo sis^g uo 


o 

o* 


o 
© 

CO 


o 

o 

OO 


o 
o 


o 
o 
in 


o 
o 

O0 


o 
o 




o 

CD 
CM 






o 
o 

CO 




CD 

CD 
00 




'ITJOQ jo spunojlooi -rad 


















OO 






r- 








spunod-^ooj ut j A^nQ 


lO 


CO 


CO 




CM 


-* 


CO 




CM 






-* 




CO 




•Surjqgrj 


o 

CD 


o 
o 


o 
o 


o 
o 


o 
o 


o 

o 


o 

o 


1 


o 
o 


1 


i 


o 


i 


o 




jo Sui^'Bajj joj uoi^onp 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 




o 






o 




o 




-8Q ou tdjig joj pa^oauoo 
'IBoq jo spunoj 001 JacI 


t^ 


CO 
CM 


o 

00 


-*• 

in 


CO 


CO 

in 


CO 




00 






o 




o 
o 

CD 




spunod-^oojj at A^nQ 


US 


CO 


CO 




CM 


■* 


CO 




CM 






■* 




CO 




H 




->*> 






























fa 




oo 


























00 




I-] ,_; 


'Z -o^; auiSug; 


CM 






I 


1 


i 


1 


1 


1 


1 


i 


1 


i 










CO 


































1-1 
































CO 


CM 


o> 


o 


o 


CO 


m 




,_, 






o> 










fr- 


o 


CM 


CO 


in 








CO 






o 








>• 


•j *o^[ ouiSug; 


CM 


CO 


CO 


in 


,_J 


■* 


•>* 


1 


CO 


1 


i 


CO 


i 






<* 




CO 


CO 


co 


CM 


CO 


CO 


CO 




CO 






CO 




CO 








,— ' 


1—1 


T_l 


1—1 


*" H 


!-* 




1-1 






J—t 








Sui 


CO 


,_, 


>* 


t^ 


CO 


fr- 


■># 




fr- 






fr- 




CO 




-^qSiq; jo Sui^eajj joj uot^ 


t^- 


© 


"<* 


CM 


"* 


in 


fr- 


( 


co 


1 


i 


o 


i 


CO 




-onpaQ ou : i^oq jo puno j 


eo 

o 


fr- 

CM 


o 


CM 

fr- 


CM 

CO 


OS 

oo 


in 




CM 

-tfl 






in 

co 




CM 




jed podumd saojpjQ 


m 


CO 


CO 




C3 


CO 


CO 




CM 






CO 




CO 






CO 


->*l 


V5 


ee . 


CO 


OS 


o 


O 


CO 


o> 


■* 


00 




o 




•J95[UTIO 


OS 


rH 


^H 


CO 


in 


^H 


Tt< 


CM 


in 


o 


■>* 


a> 


i 


CM 




puB sausy jo '^uao J9J 




i— 1 




T-t 








i-H 


i— i 


CM 








i— 1 






m 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


in 


•* 


in 


in 


o 


•«*• 


OO 


1 






00 


lO 


00 


CM 


OS 


m 


in 


CO 


o 


fr- 


CO 


fr- 


fr- 






•(spunoj) 


US 


o 


CO 


fr- 


fr^ 


fr- 


m 


CO 


CO 


m 


CJa 


in 


-«*< 






jojjut^q Tpwe ' saqsy psjox 


CO 
CM 




CO 


C3 


fr- 


-* 


fr- 




CO 


CO 


•>* 


T-H 


00 
CM 








O 


o 


o 


m 


o 


m 


o 


o 


m 


o 


in 


o 


in 


1 






<M 




oo 


C2 




"*i 


o 


CM 


o 


CO 


m 


CO 


CO 






•(spunoj) 


CM 


CO 


o 


CO 


oo 


in 


m 


CO 


'■"1 


*■* 


CO 


o 








paumsuoo I^oq I^ox 


CM 


>* 


1— t 


00 

m 


o 
m 


CO 
CM 


in 

CM 


CO 

1— I 


CO 
CM 




TJ4 

CO 


00 


o 








CO 




-* 


CM 




CO 


(35 




o 






o 


co 






•(suoubq uonnK) 


o 


CM 


»n 


CM 


00 


•■j 


CO 


1 


co 


1 


1 


1-H 


o 


1 




psduind Aji^uctiq l^joj, 


CM 

1— 1 


-*l 


o 


•* 


^ 


00 


CO 




m" 






CO 


CO 
CO 








•(suoiibq aonnw) 


CO 
























CO 






cm 


dijg joj pa^oejjoo 


o 


1 




1 


1 


1 


1 


I 


I 


I 




1 


o 


1 




O 


'pedumd .Aji^uotiq 


































.So 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


i 


I 


1 


1 


o 


1 




fc 




&*> 
























CM 






o 
ft 


•auiyx Suiduinj; i^;ox 
































W 




,H co 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


I 


1 


1 


1 


CO 
CO 


1 






•(snon«0 uo ?II!I\:) 


m 


CM 


its 


CM 
CM 


00 


CO 


CO 




o 

CO 






O 

7— 1 


in 






1-1 


dijg joj p9}08jjoo 


CO 


CO 


o 


"* 


_ 


oo 


CO 




m 






CO 


CO 






o 


'peduind A^rjuBriQ 


S 


Tt< 


■* 




^ 


-* 


■<* 










TtH 


CO 








.S 1 " 


o 


m 


O 


m 


o 


o 


1 


o 


1 


1 


O 


in 


1 




h-i 




^ 


>o 


o 


CO 


m 


m 


in 




rH 






-# 


'""' 






a 


auitx Sutdinnj p3}0X 


























^H 








CO lO 




m 


CO 


CO 


c 


o 










CO 








H 




Kco 


■* 


CM 




CO 


■* 


CM 


1 




1 


1 


CM 

i— 1 


CD 


1 




ONTH. 
































§ 


































>> 


>> 














^2 


f-T 


s-T 

^2 


0> 
^2 


"3 


03 

S3 










o3 

a 

e3 
1-3 


03 


^3 
u 

c3 


< 








< 


d 

o 
a 

CO 


CO 

o 

S3 

O 


o 


03 
O 

0> 

Q 


o 


> 
< 





No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



143 




144 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



5- 

<» 

ho 






Si, 



HO 



HO g 






O 



HO 

05 



e 

HO 

^2 



O 

m 
< 



CO 

C5 Q 


•(SUOUBQ UOIf 


CO 


CO 

o 


CO TtH 


i-H ** 

00 o 


o 

o 


t>i 

00 


1^ 

CO 




OS 


~ITH) paduind 


o 


o 


Tt* t-H 


co co 


** 


1 


1 






it^ijnBTi^ 


o 

CO 


CM 


1-1 


1-1 


" H 




1— 1 




-* 


w « 


aS'BjaAy AjreQ 




















|H - 






















•(SUOJ 


o 


t^ 


O CM 


i-H CO 


OS 


o 








CM 




CM CM 


00 rH 


CO 


CO 


t^ 


«o 




< • 


-I«0 uo HUH) 


_• 


CO 


«o •* 


i-i 00 


CO 


1 


1 


o 


1 


sg 


dijg joj pajoaj 


CO 
OS 


«o 


tH 


T-l T# 


•* 




CO 

co 






§* 


-joo 'paduind 
















T— 1 




p 
to 


A^u'BnQ p^ox 




















•Sui^qSt^ jo 


o 


1 


1 1 


1 1 


[ 


1 ) 1 


1 o 


1 


o 


Sntyeaii joj uoi^onp 


o 




. 








o 




o 


-9Q ou ^uauiao^idsiQ 


o 












o 




o 
o 


jaSunjj; jo sis^g no 


c* 












CO 






'[■Bo-Ojospunojooiaad 


Tt< 












Tt< 




■>* 


spunod-^ooj ui A^tiq 




















•Sui^uSii jo 


o 
o 


1 


1 1 


1 1 


1 


1 1 


1 o 

o 


1 


o 
o 


Suipajj JOJ uoi^onpaQ 














o 




o 


ou tdijg joj pa^oajjoo 


t^ 
















^H 


'poo jo spunoj 001 JQd 


^ 
















spunod-^ooj ui A^nQ 


tH 












1— 1 




1—1 




OS 












CO 




CM 




<* 












CD 




CD 


'(^l) WH 9St?jaAy 


Cs° 


1 


1 1 


1 1 


1 


1 1 


i-H 


1 


OS 


•Sm%x\Si r i 


CM 

CO 












co 






jo Sui^ajj joj uoiipnp 


o 


1 


1 1 


1 1 


1 


1 1 


1 


1 


t^ 


-8Qou i paoQ jo parlor 


■>* 












■* 




>* 


J9d paduind suoflBQ 


1-1 












* H 




rt 




t^ 












CO 




t- 


■rapxno 


_J 


1 


1 1 


1 1 


1 


1 1 


1 


1 


^ 


puB saqsy jo '^uao jaj 






















O 


1 


1 1 


1 1 


1 


1 1 i 


1 "3 


tf5 


1 




t^ 












O 


I>. 




•(spunoj) 
jajfuijQ pui3 saqsy 


CM 

to 

CO 












OS 
CM 


cm" 

OS 






"lO 


1 


1 1 


1 J 


1 


1 1 


1 o 


»o 


1 




CM 














CO 




•(spunoj) 
paransuoo jboq 


00* 
CO 












CM* 
CM 
CM 


CO 

cT 

CO 


















OJ 


i-H 




•(suoipsQ 


OS 


1 


1 1 


1 I 


1 


1 1 


CO 
1 


CO 


i 


no HITH) d IIS ao J P^09J 


o 












CM 


CM 




-joo 'paduind A^i^nrenQ 
















i—l 






fl o 


1 


1 1 


1 1 


1 


1 1 


1 o 


O 


I 




• - o 












CO 


CO 






§ 


















•auiix Suiduinj p^ox 


CO O 

U CO 


1 


1 1 


1 1 


1 


1 1 


1 "5 

CM 


o 

O0 
00 


I 


a* 




















M 




















a 




















o 




















§ 
























>> 

u 

c« 

d 
►-a 


u 

CD 




S 1-9 


a; 

4 'a 1 
-^ 1 ft i 

i-s <J 02 O 


•5 -° 

O CD 

Z Q 


*c3 
o 
H 


CJ 
M 
oS 
u 

CD 
> 
< 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



145 



o -a 







•SupuSii 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


O 


© 


© 




© 




1 




jo sm^eojj joi uon 


© 
© 


© 
© 


© 
© 


© 
© 


© 
© 


©> 

© 


© 
© 


© 
© 


© 
© 


© 


© 
© 


© 




© 


-onpoQ ou ; ^uouiao'Bf d 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 






-stq jaSunjj jo sis^g 


cq 


OO 


© 


CO 


CO 


<M 


CO 


OS 


© 


CO 


Oi 
CM 






us 

CO 


no 'poo jo spunoj 001 
jad spunod-^ooj ui jtynQ 


CO 
00 


o 

© 


©1 


CO 

© 


CO 

© 


CO 


co 
© 


© 


© 


CO 

© 


00 

© 


Oi 
00 




oo 

Ci 


•Sui^qSiq; 


© 
© 


© 
© 


o 
© 


© 
© 


© 
© 


© 

o 


© 
© 


© 
© 


© 

© 


© 
© 


© 
© 


© 
© 


1 


© 


JO Sui^bojj joj uox^onp 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


©_ 




©1 


-8Q ou Idijg joi pa^ooj 


lO 


© 


© 

CM 


© 

CD 


© 

Oi 


© 

OO 


© 

CM 


© 
CO 


© 

© 


© 

Ci 


© 


© 

(M 




© 


-joo «p3oo jo spuno<j 001 
jad spunod-^oojj ui A^jtiq 


00 


© 

OO 


©" 

© 


© 

© 


© 


© 


© 


CO 

CM 

© 


Oi_ 
CM~ 

© 


CM 

© 


CO 
CO 

Oi 


CO 
00 




CD 

co 

Oi 






CO 


co 


lO 




CO 


TjH 


co 


0O 


,_, 


** 




Ci 






Eh 


'I *°N 3tn3ua 


cm' 


CD 
CM 


CM 


1 


00 


US 
CM 




<M 


CO 
CM 


CM 

cm' 


1 


CO 

©' 


1 


■* 


►3^ 




CO 


CO 


CO 




co 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 




CO 




CO 




© 


CO 


<M 


■* 


r-- 


© 


CO 


Oi 




© 


CO 


(M 




iO 




'9 '°N atnSug; 


OS 
US 


CO 


CM 

CO 


© 


co 
oi 


CN_ 


CD 
CO 


CO 


1 


Oi 

© 


1>- 

T-H 


© 

©' 


1 


CO 

© 


> 




CO 


"**H 


•* 


^H 


CO 


■* 


■* 


TJH 




•* 


-* 


■* 




TJH 




T* 


OO 


CM 


■<*H 


_ 


<M 


t^ 


© 


US 


CD 


co 


© 






'S "°N auxgug 


© 


CM 
CM - 


© 

oi 


© 




CO" 


1>- 
cnJ 


CO 


CM - 


TJH 


cq 

Oi" 


!>■ 


1 


t>- 






"* 


"* 


CO 


■<*l 


TJH 


TH 


Tfl 


■* 


■* 


•* 


CO 


-* 




rtH 


•Su\%x\'Bi r i 


© 


US 


"* 


iO 


lO 


© 


© 


»o 


CO 


CM 


,_, 


CO 




oo 


jo Suipajj joj uoi^onp 


o 


ui 


© 


© 


CM 

OS 


© 


CM 




oo 


00 
CM 


Ci 


CO 

us 


1 


CO 

oo 


-8Q ou Jpoo jo puriOfj 


<M 

lO 


CM 


<M 

00 


© 
© 


CO 
OS 


CO 


© 


© 


© 


us 

© 


© 

Oi 


CD 




oo 
oo 


j a d poduind suojp3£) 


CM 


cq 


CM 


CO 


CM 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


cq 


<M 




CM 


•jequTXO 


»o 


t^ 


00 


CO 


CO 


CM 


CO 


lO 


Oi 


US 


-<*l 


l>. 


1 


CO 


puB soqsy jo '^103 joj 


CM 


o 




<M 


CM 


CM 


CM 


CO 




CM 


CO 


(M 




CM 




US 


© 


lO 


© 


lO 


lO 


© 


lO 


us 


IC 


© 


us 


© 






CO 


OO 


CO 


CM 




rH 


© 


Oi 


rH 


TJH 


CM 


© 


-*l 




•(spunoj) 


CO 


1^ 


CO 


>o 


00 


© 


!>. 


CO 


t^ 


•"1 


© 


Oi 


CO 


1 


pouinsuoo jboq I^ox 


© 
00 




© 


(M 

CO 


CM 

CO 


© 
CO 


CD 
CO 


CO 

CO 


CO 


© 

US 
CO 


Oi 

cq 

CO 


© 


© 




•(suoj 


00 


_, 


^H 


OO 


CN 


^ 


© 


O0 


OO 


e^i 


(M 


OO 




© 


US 






CO 


00 


•<* 


"* 


CM 


t^ 


00 


Oi 






■* 


"T^O U0T II T H) poduind 


© 


lO 


«o 


*n 


© 


t^ 


CM 


o 


!>. 


•* 


00 


Tt< 


1 


CM 


A^T^UBTIQ OSBJOAy A^reQ 


©' 
CO 


Tti 


CO 


CO 


CO 


©" 

CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


-*' 

CO 


CO 


"*' 

CO 




CO 
CO 




i-H 


,_, 


Tt< 


■* 


CO 


CO 


CO 


!>. 


us 


CO 


CO 


us 


US 






00 


CO 


C35 




»o 


CM 


■>* 


CO 


CO 


Oi 


I>- 


Oi 


t~ 




•(suon'BO troiniH) 


© 


<M 


T— 1 


CD 


CO 


CM 


CO 


^ 


CO 


CO 


CD 


CO 


t>~ 


1 


poduind A'^u'enQ ib^ox 


CM 


© 

CO 


CO 


© 


CD 
© 


05 


CM 


© 


CO 


CO 

© 


US 
© 


CO 

© 


(M 

CM 






^ 


1-1 


^ 






1-1 


1-1 


1— 1 


1—1 


rt 




1— ( 


CO 






•(SUOIp3£) UOTJ 


CO 
CM 


CM 

io 


00 

© 




CO 

CO 


->*l 


i— 1 
© 


00 

CO 


© 

© 


© 




CM 


© 
CM 




*" 


-ITH) d US JO J pav>w 


© 


© 


CO 


1 


CI 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


t^ 


1 


us 


!>. 


1 


o 


-joo 'poduind A^u^riQ 


CM 




CO 






CM 


00 


iO 


<M 


00 
f-H 




■* 
t^ 


CO 
CD 

CM" 






P< KO 


US 


© 


1 


© 


»o 


© 


lO 


© 


in 


1 


o 


us 


1 




02 CO 


CM 


© 




>o 


iO 


T_l 


CO 


CO 


CM 




CM 


us 






•8unx Suiduinj pnox 


CO 


<M 


1 


tH 


© 


00 


x*H 


o 


© 


1 


© 


© 


1 


w 




l-i »H 


!>• 


© 






»o 


TtH 


© 


CO 


CO 




t--. 


t- 






w M 


'SH 


CM 






CM 


CM 


i— 1 


CM 


CM 




US 


OD_ 
CM 






•(SUOJP3J9 UOTf 


© 


© 


«* 
t^ 


© 

© 


© 
CO 


O0 
CD 


CO 


Oi 
CM 




© 


© 
CO 


us 

O0 


i—l 
CO 




CO 


-\m) d HS JO J papeJ 


00 


t^. 


t^ 


CM 


m 


,_; 


CO 


00 


1 


CD 


CO 


t^ 


t^ 


1 


o 


-joo 'poduind A'^rni'BnQ 




CO 




CO 


"5 




"3 


r^ 




CM 


© 

1— 1 




© 

CO 






fl m 


US 


© 


© 


lO 


"5 


iO 


© 


1 


© 


us 


© 


© 


1 




3 " 

CO °0 


CO 


CM 


CO 


«o 


CM 


■^ 


CM 




CO 


CM 


■<* 


T— 1 






•aunx Suidumj ps^ox 


©> 


CD 


©1 


t^ 


i— I 


o> 


i— I 


1 


■* 


o 


00 


oo 


1 


H 






CM 




CO 


t» 




M< 


r- 




CM 


Oi 




© 






n 






<M 


Tf 












1— t 










•(SUOJp3f3 UOIJ 


00 

© 




CM 




lO 


•«* 


CD 
© 


© 


© 

CM 


© 
i— l 


© 


© 

OO 


CO 

00 






-UK) d HS JO J P^09-i 


CO 


Ttl 


© 


■* 


US 


r^ 


oo 


Oi 


t--. 


US 


CO 


CO 


CM 


1 


d 


-joo 'poduind A^i^irenQ 


CM 

© 


CO 


00 


CD 

CD 


OO 

CO 


© 


oo 


CO 

oo 


i-H 
Oi 


US 
CO 


CO 

1^ 


CO 


CO 
CM_ 

©~ 






d © 


o 


© 


>o 


m 


© 


>c 


U3 


o 


us 


© 


© 


»n 


1 




£ ° 


o 




o* 


"-i 


© 


© 


o 


© 


© 


CO 


© 


us 




C5 
!z; 


•oraix Suiduinj i^ox 


<5 


CO 


00 


,_, 


CO 


© 


CO 


00 


© 


© 


US 


>o 


CO 


1 


H 




M ■* 


co 


CO 


OO 


CO 




© 




CM 


CM 


OO 


CO 


oo 






w *- 


CO 


t^. 


"# 


CO 


t^. 


t~- 


t>. 


t>. 


t--. 


CO 


CM 






W 

H 

2; 


















u 












o 


















o 




CD 


<0 

a 

o 

Q 




C3 






a 


9 

t-3 


1 


u 

u 






o 

3 


1-8 


CO 

So 


a 

a 
o 


i-T 

o 
o 

O 


s 

CD 

o 


c3 
O 
H 


3 



146 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 









to 



O T3 






o 






05 
rH 

6 

H 

< 



•Sui%x\'Si r i 


o 
o 


o 
o 


o 

Q 


O 

o 


o 
o 


o 
o 


O 
O 


o 
o 


o 
o 


o 
o 


o 

o 


o 
© 


1 


o 

© 


jo Sup'eajj joj uoi^onp 
-aQ ou ! ^uauraotq'dsiQ 


© 
o 

CM 

CO 


o 


O 

o" 

OS 
CO 


© 

OO 


o 
o 

OO 


o 
oo 




o 

oo 


o 
o 
o 


o" 
o 


o 


©_ 
o 




©__ 

© 
© 


jaSunjfj jo sisBg uo 


m 


o 


CO 


t^ 


t^ 


1*1 




CO 


CO 


CM 


-* 


CM 




in 


'I^OQ jo spuno j 001 ^ d 


■* 


CO 


lO 


lO 


>o 


lO 


lO 


lO 


1C5 


»o 


»o 


CO 




in 


spurtod-^oo^j ut A^riQ 
































o 


O 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


O 


1 


© 


•SupniSirj jo 


o 
o 


o 
o 


o 
o 


o 
o 


o 
o 


o 
o 


CD 
O 


o 
o 


o 
o 


o 
o 


CO 

o 


o 
o 




© 
© 


Sui^ajj JOJ uoi^oripaQ 
ou' !di[g joj pa^ioajjoo 


o 

CO 


o 

m 

CO 


o 

in 


o 
1*1 

CO 


o 


o 
o 


o 

CO 


o 

CO 


o 

Oi 


o 

Oi 

Oi 


o 


o 
1*1 




©" 
© 

CO 


'iBoojospunojooiJad 


CM 

i# 


m 


CO 


1*1 


1*1 




CO 


o 


(M 


00 




Oi 




CM 


spunod-^ooj ut A}riQ 


































r- 


Ol 


r^ 


t^ 


o 


O 


CO 




t^ 


T-H 


>o 




CO 




CM 


co 


CO 


OO 


o 


r^ 


o 


Oi 


1*1 


o 


00 


CO 




CM 


"(V&&) +JTI 8SBJ8Ay 


CM 


o 
cxi 


Ol 


CM 


CM 

CM 


<M 


CM 


CM 
CM 


CM 


1* 

CM 


CO 
<M 


CO 
CM 




CM 
CM 




$ 


1*1 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


in 


t~- 


>o 


CO 


lO 






CM 


jo Supuajj joj uoi^orip 


CM 


"- 1 


CO 


t~ 


■*! 


x>- 


1*1 


CO 


m 


>« 


CM 




i*l 


o 


CM 


1*1 


CO 
CM 


CM 


OS 


i>~ 


lO 

CO 




*& 


t^ 


CO 
i*i 




CO 
Oi 


-eQ ou : [boq jo puno<j 


"* 


*G 


m 


lO 


lO 


i* 


1*1 


1*1 


1*1 


1*1 


■* 


in 




■* 


jad paduind suoj^q 
































t» 


<M 


_ 


CO 


CO 


00 


CO 


iC 


t^ 


,_, 


Oi 


CM 




!>• 


■*»FIIO 


^H 


,H 


CM 


CM 


CM 


CM 


CO 


CO 


CM 


CO 


CO 


CO 




CM 


pui3 saqsy jo ^uao ja<j 
































o 


lO 


in 


O 


o 


lO 


o 


iC 


»n 


o 


o 


o 


m 


1 




CO 


00 




CM 


CM 


in 


oo 


CO 


oo 


CM 


t^ 


lO 


1*1 




•(epunoj) 


00 


CM 


«""i 


CO 


»o 


"-I 


CO 


o 


Oi 


•* 


CO 


CO 


1*1 




j e 5{ u t { q pus saqsy 


CO 


00 
CO 


co 




CO 
00 


00 

oo 


00 


1*1 

Oi 


CO 


CM 

Ol 


00 

CO 


CO 


CO 
Oi 






o 


m 


m 


lO 


o 


o 


o 


lO 


m 


o 


US 


o 


© 


I 




oi 


1— t 


CO 


O0 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


tH 


CM 


»o 


o 


CO 




•(spunoj) 


oo 


l>. 


1*1 


r~ 


1*1 


lO 


CO 


CO 


o 


CO 


Oi 


o 


1*1 




pauinsuoo jboq 


i>r 


2 


oo 

CM 


CM 

CO 


oo 


CD 

OO 


CO 


O0 

Oi 


Oi 


CO 

o 


CO 


o 


CO 






CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


J>. 


CO 


1* 


i>r 






o 


CO 


m 


>* 


^ 


C5 


CM 


t>. 


CO 


us 


1*1 


CO 


© 




■(suon«o 


CO 


Jr~ 


1*1 


OS 


Oi 


C35 


o 


CO 


t^ 


CO 


CO 


t^ 


CO 


1 


uo III!K) d HS J0 J P^pa* 


CO 
CO 


CO 


o 


CO 
CO 


CO 

co 


CM 


OS 


CO 
CM 


CM 


00 


"5 

CO 


in 

CO 


CO 

oo 




-joo 'padumd A^i^u'eriQ 




Ol 


Ol 


Ol 


o 


o_ 


Oi 


o 


o 


o 


Oi 


CO 


©" 






a m 


m 


Ifl 


o 


o 


"5 


o 


o 


o 


us 


iC 


»n 


in 


1 




3 


1-1 


o 


CO 


CM 


i*l 


CM 


o 


o 


CM 


1*1 


CO 


© 




■9UUX Sutduinj jbjoj, 






























02 CO 


^H 


O0 


CO 


00 


00 


o 


1*1 


CO 


o 


t^ 


Oi 


© 


I 




f-i CM 


t^ 


CO 




CO 


>-l 


m 


-* 




T)H 




Oi 


t^ 






w ~ 


CO 


t> 


t>. 


l>- 


!>• 


t^ 


t^ 


o- 


t-» 


t^ 


■* 


co_ 




o 
































03 


03 

3 

,Q 

CD 


u 
S3 


'u 

a 
< 


>> 

03 
3 


1-5 


"3 

1-5 


CO 


u 

s 

<x> 
a 

CD 

Id 


s-T 
o 
pQ 

o 
-p 
o 

o 


0) 

B 

o 

> 

o 


rQ 

a 

o 

CD 
P 


"e8 

o 


o 

03 
Sh 
CD 
> 
< 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



147 



Ob 
►*5 



PQ 
Oh 

© i 

©^ w 



00 



2» CD 

•5 » 



© 
e 

<» 

©< 

O 



© 
to 



o 
6 

H 

ffl 
<j 

H 



jo gai^ajj JOj uoi^onp 

-9Q OH I ^U9UiaO'B{(isiQ 

jagunjjj jo sis^g no 
'poo jo spuno j 001 -rad 
sptmod-^oojj ui Aq.nQ 



•gui^uSFj jo Sut 
-}i38H JO J uoi^onpaQ 
on Idijg joj pVpajJOO 
'yeoQ jo spunoj OOI J8d 
spunod-^oo^ ut AjriQ 



'(^lI) 1}]1 8§^J8Ay 



•SuTjqSiq; 
jo Sm^ajj joj uoi^oiip 
-8Q ou ! p30;3 jo pimoj 
jad padnind suon^O 



■J83[UIIO 

pu-e saqsy jo *^U8Q joj 



•(spunoj) 
j 8 5i u t { O P u13 seqsy 



•(spunoj) 
patnnsuoo [eoq 



•(SUOIP3Q 

U0 TinM) d HS J0 J P8P9J 
-joo 'paduind A^.i^u'enQ 



•8UITX Sutdranj p^ox 



I I CO 1 I I I C5 I 



H 



3 rd - 

So" 



.« £ 



ft 



ft £ 



<3 CZ2 O 



n 



148 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



1—1 

e 



to 

© 



©s 
•<s> 

© 
Oh 

© ,— , 
©-, d 



o> 



^ :§ 



©5 

© 

"<o 

-*o 

© 

o 



MO 



0l> 

•to 

© 

-*o 



6 

H 
< 



CO 


•(suoubo tioi[ 


CO 


rH 

CO 


UO 
CO 


OO 
CO 


00 


CM 


1(0 

no 


co 

CO 


CO 
rH 


OO 
U0 


CM 

CO 


CO 
no 




CO 


"I T H) paoTuind 


no 


C5 


o 


C5 


CO 


lO 


CM. 


© 


t- 


1>- 


rH 


no 


i 


CO 


$• 


A%T.%wen£) 


to 


CO 


!>. 


CO 


t^ 


OS 


00 


00 


t^ 


© 


co 


CO 




t~ 


Hg 


8SBJ9Ay A"[IBQ 






























00 

1* . 
































•(SUO[ 


OS 


no 


O 




CO 


CO 


© 

00 


CM 

T— 1 


00 
CM 


1—1 
no 


no 
OO 


CO 

t-H 


00 
OO 




11 


-[BQ uotinw) 




rH 


00 


OS 


CO 


»o 


"0 


© 


CM 


OS 


cot 




00 


1 


dqg joj pa^oaj 


CM 




<M 


o 


CO 
CM 


OO 
CM> 


no 
CM 


rH 
CM 


CO 
CM 


© 
CM 


1— t 


© 


OO 
CO 




§ 


-joo 'podumd 


























CM 






A^UBTlQ [B^OX 






























•Sut^qSiq; 


o 


o 


<=/ 


o 


Ol' 


o 


©i 


© 


o 


© 


© 


© 




© 






O' 


o 


c> 


© 


















jo Sui^ajj joj uoporip 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 




© 


-0Q OU 1 ^U0UI80B[dSIQ 


o 

. CM 


o 

KO 


o . 
rH 


©■• 


rH 


© 

OO 


©' 


© 

CO 


© 

03 


© 

C5 


©■ 


© 

© 




© 

CO 


jo3un[<j jo stsbq uo 








CM 


CO 


OO 




fc~ 


© 


no 


T-H 


OS 




t~ 


•[Boo J° spuno j 001 J 8d 


CM 


CM 


CM 


<M 


UO 
CM 


CO 
CO 


00 
CM 


CM 


OO 
CM 


CO 
CM 


CO 
CM 


CM 
CM 




no 
CM 


spunod-^ooj m Atiq 




























T_l 


•Sm^qSiq; jo Sui 


o 

o 


o 
o 


o 
o 


o 
o 


o 
o 


o 

© 


© 

© 


o 
© 


o 


© 
O 


© 

© 


© 
© 


1 


© 
© 


-^bojj joj uoi^onpeQ 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o_ 


© 


©_ 


©_ 


©_ 


©_ 


©_ 


©_ 




O 


ou Idqg joj po^oojjoo 
'[boo jo spunoj 001 •»<* 


p. 

oo. 
© 


CO 

cm" 


rH 

CM 


o 

o 

00 


o 

rH 


CM 
CM^ 


© 
CO 
no 


© 

CM 
CM 


o" 

rH 
no 


©" 

CO 


©" 

CO 


© 

no 
rH- 




CO 
CM 


spunod-^ooj UI A^TIQ 


CM 


CM 


CM 




CM : 


CO 


CM 


CM 


CM 


CM 


CM 


CM 




CM 




i> 


rH 


rH 


lO 


rH 


t^ 


t^ 


^ H 


!>. 


CM 


rH 


CM 




rH 




CM 


rH 


CM ' 


CM 


I>. 


© 


OO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


© 


rH 




© 


■(^8J) ^JH 8SBJ8AV 


t^ 


I-~ 


t^ 


r^ 


CO 


rH 


rH 


no 


00 


t^ 


OO 


l>- 


1 


CM 




CM 


(M 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CM 


CM 


CM 


CM 




co 
i— t 


•Sui^qSix 


!>. 


© 


OO 


,_, 


rH- 


CO 


CM 


no 


CO 


© 


rH 


00 




i-~ 


O 


rH 


© 




O 


OS 


CO 


OS 


CM 


rH 


C5 


t^ 




CO 


JO But^bojj; joj uoi^onp 


o 


rH 


t^ 


OS 


_; 


rH 


t>- 


co- 


,_; 


© 


i-H 


rH 


1 


© 


-8Q ou ! [boo J° punoj 


rH 


UO 


o 


CO 

o 


00 
O 


t^ 






t^ 


CO 


CO 


CO 




CM 


jod peduind suo[[bo 




























i— t 




CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


OS 


00 


05 


rn 


OS 


rH 


no 


© 




CM 


•J93pn[0 


rH 


rH 


CJ' 


<M 


,-« 


CM 


CM 


,_; 


^h' 


CM 


CM 


CM 




CM 


puB soqsy jo '^uao J3J 
































i— 1 


IC 


<M 


CO 


Cft 


CO 


© 


no 


© 


© 


© 


no 


no 


1 




CO 


t"~ 


CO 


C3 




t^ 


t^, 


CO 


00 


rH 


© 


rH 


CO 




•(spunoj) 


lO 


■"*! 


OS 


t^. 


© 


»~1 


rH 


CO 


no 


OO 


© 


i—l 


CO_ 






o" 


© 






co" 


CM 














co" 




j o q u i [ o puB soqsy 


CM 




<M 


CM 


CM 


CM 


CM 


CM 


CM 


CM 


CM 


CM 


00 
CM 






CO 


© 


CO 


CM 


l>- 


t-- 


© 


© 


t^ 


l-~ 


CM 


rH.' 


© 


1 




o 


CO 


iO 


OO 


lO 


CO 


no 


rH 


i— t 


t~ 


CO 


©, 


CO 




•(spunoj) 




7—1 

oo" 




T-H 


rH 


lO 


© 


CM 


CO 

oo" 


00 


CO 


©■ 


rH_. 




poransuoo [boq 


!>. 


co 


OS 


o 




t^. 


(M 


CM. 


© 


00 


© 


t- 






1—1 


T-H 




CM 


CM 


T-f 


CM 


cm; 




1—1 


T— 1 




c<o 
cm" 






1—1 


UO 


OS 


UO 


CO 


CO 


© 


CM 


00 


1— t 


no 


co 


© 






© 






o 




t~- 


00 




CM 


no 


t>. 








•(SUO[[BO 




rH 






co 












© 


CO 




1 , 


uo TTUK) d HS JO J pa^09J 


O 


© 


i— 1 


o 


CO 


<=> 


no 


rH 


CO 


© 


00 


© 


OS 




-joo 'peduind a^ubuq 


























CM 






fir b 

a o 


o 


"5 


o 


lO 


m 


© 


© 


© 


no 


o 


© 


© 


1 




3 °° 

73 "5 


CO 


tH 


rH 


CO 


o 


© 


no 


rH 


1-1 


CO 


T— 1 


CO 




•euiTxfSuTduinj [B^ox 


rH 


O 




K0 


CO 


T— t 


t^ 


CO 


CO 


t^ 


CO 


CO 


1 






CO 




lO 


OO 


rH 




C5 


t^ 


no 


CM 


rH 


CO 






W N 


cm* 


<M 


CM 


CM 


CM 


CO 


CM 


CM 


CM 


CM 


CM 


1— 1 
CO 




Month. 


































Si 3 
t-s 


ft, 

•r-. 

© 
PR 








CI 


1-9 


-P 
CO 

3 
bJO 

< 


© 

g 
©, 

© 


© 
Q 

© 
O 


© 

© 
> 

o 


© 

a 
© 
© 
© 

Q 


"c3 

o 


© 
bfl 

© 
> 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



149 



^2- 
>-i 

to 
S- 











C3i 




K 




•<s> 




a* 




g 




s 




Oh 




S 




o 




**o 




c» 




S 




•<s> 








S- 


' .' 


^ 


ft 


-*o 


m 


e 


o 


<^ 


M-l 


*"H 


-d 



« I 



6q 



o 



■so 



■to 

^2 



Cm 

6 

H 

PQ 
< 



■Sui^qSiq; 


o 
o 


o 
o 


o 
o 


© 
o 


o 
o 


o 

o 


o 
o 


o 

o 


o 
o 


o 

o 


o 

CO 


o 

o 


1 


o 

o 


jo Surpajj joj uoi^onp 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o_ 


o_ 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 




o 


-8Q OU t^U8UI80'B[dSIQ 


t~ 


lO 


o 
oo 


o 




Ui 


o 

CO 


o 

05 


o 

C35 


o~ 


o 
o 


© 

Oi 




© 


joSuriT^ jo sis^g ao 




oT 


* 


Th 


CM_ 


c^ 


00_ 

oo" 


CM_ 
Ui 


cp" 




CO_ 

o 


00 




■* 


'[wo J° spuno j 001 J9<I 


CO 


lO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


t^ 


CO 


CO 


cff 


Ui 


Ui 


Ui 




o 


spunod-^oo^ ui A^nQ 
































o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


1 


o 


•Sui^uSt^ jo Sui 


o 
o 


o 
o 


o 
o 


o 
o 


o 

o 


o 
o 


CD 

o 


o 
o 


o 
o 


o 
o 


o 
o 


o 
© 




o 
o 


-^ajj -ioj' uoicpnpaQ 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 




o 


ou tdijg joj pa^oajJOD 


00 


■>* 


-* 


CM 


o 


OS 


CO 


OO 


Ui 

CO 


CO 

oo 




Oi 
Oi 




CO 
CO 


'poo jo spuno<j 001 -tad 
spunod-^oo^ ux A^tiq 


o 

CO 


00 


o 

CO 


CO 
O 


O0 

CO 


CM 


CO 


CO 


to 

CO 


CO 

Ui 


Oi 


Ui 

1 




CM 

CO 




Ifl 


t~» 


Ui 


CO 


1— 1 


OO 


t^ 


Ui 


CO 


o 


<* 


1C 




CO 




1—1 


lO 


o 


t~ 


C5 


I>. 


■«* 


Ui 


00 


o 


CO 


*# 




o 


'U 8a jl) WI 93BJ8AY 


U3 

00 


oo 


00 


00 


O0 


its 

00 


oo 


00 


CM 

oo 


o 

00 




O0 




CM 

00 




CM 


CM 


CM 


C5 


05 


<M 


CM 


CM 


CM 


CM 


CM 


C<1 




CM 




r~ 


00 


«o 


lO 


o 


o 


OS 


t^ 


Ui 


■"*• 


Ci 


■* 




t--. 


•Sux^qSiT; 


o 


o 




(M 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


t^ 






CM 


jo 3ui^B8ji joj uoi^onp 


CO 
Ui 


CO 

•>* 






o 

C2 


CO 

o 


oo 

oo 


CO 


O0 


CO 


CO 






Ui 

CO 


-9Q ou '. Y30Q jo punoj 


CM 


CM 


CM 


<M 


cq 


CO 


CM 


CM 


CM 


CM 


CM 


CM 




CM 


jad paduind suojpso 
































CO 


,_, 


Oi 


CO 


c?q 


o 


CM 


1^ 


o 


CO 


CO' 


t>- 




Oi 


•J85TUHO 


© 


Oi 


00 


t^ 


oo 


00 


00 


00 


OS 


o 


o 


© 


1 


00 


pue soqsy jo '^uao -iaj 
































CO 




CM 


oo 


lO 


^ 


OS 




1— 1 


o> 


oo 


OO 


CO 


1 




00 


CM 




"* 


cq 


O0 


O0 


C5 




1-» 


CO 


o 


!>. 




•(spunoj) 


"* 


CM 


lO 


<M 


tr^ 


OS 


t^ 


Ui 


CO 


CO 


lO 


■* 


■* 




j93[uiio P UB saqsy 


o 


ui 


CO 


lO 


CO 


t>. 


CO 


CO 


00 


00 


Ui 


oo 


00 






o 


lO 


o 


o 


o 


CO 


Ui 


© 


lO 


!>. 


Ui 


lO 


O0 


1 




Oi 


CO 


oo 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CM 


Oi 


Ui 


Ui 




•(spunoj) 


CO 


CO 


"0 


t^ 


CO 


OS 


o 


lO 


CM 


CM 


CM 


Oi 


00 






00 






oo 




OS 












CO 






pOUItlSUOO |BOQ 


lO 


lO 


t~ 


CD 


00 


OS 


00 


l>- 


Oi 


00 


Ui 


00 


Oi 






CO 


as 


o 


CM 


CO 


Ui 


00 


t>. 


t-H 


Oi 


CO 


Oi 


© 




•(suon^o 


o 


*"! 


t- 


I>- 


l>. 


CO 


OS 


CO 


l^ 


t^ 


1— 1 


■* 


00 


1 


uotipj\[) dqg joj pa^oaj 


Ui 


■* 


00 


00 


CO 
CM 


o 

CO 


<M 


o 

CM 


Ui 
CM 


Oi 
1— i 


*— 1 


Oi 


•>* 




-jo'o 'paduind Aii^umiQ 


























<H 






a o 


UO 


o 


o 


i« 


o 


o 


Ui 


lO 


o 


o 


lO 


Ui 


1 




£ " 


-«f 


CO 


o 


T ~ l 


o 


o 


T— i 


"* 


CO 


CO 


"* 


-* 




•auiix Suidumj p^ox 






























cc ■* 












Ui 


"* 


>o 




00 




Oi 


1 




(h !>• 


CO 


CO 


CO 


o 


oo 




-<*l 


CO 




l>. 


Oi 


*# 






w ™ 


CO 


-* 


"* 


Ui 


Ui 


Ui 


MH 


Ui 


"* 


CM 


■* 


CO 

us" 




si 
§3 

o 

3 






















£ 


(-T 




of 

bfl 

c3 






49 


o 
u 


u 

a 

< 


a 




►^ 


Oi 

9 
M 


s 

o5 


(* 

o 

o 

o 


6 

p 
o 
5? 


1 

CD 

Q 


08 

o 
H 


0} 

> 



150 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 






CQ 



£ 




•<s> 




^H 




s 




s 




0s 




£ 




o 




«+o 




Cs> 




s 




•c^> 




f~i 




J- 




^ 


a 


e 


co 


>~H 



cm 


1-H 


T) 




CD 


o 


£ 


^ 


_c 




Rl 


<a 




K 


■+3 


'c^ 


ti 


535 


o 



KJ 



C£> 



MO 



CO 

d 

W 

H 



CO 

5 


•(SU0[p3Q UOTJ 


o 


00 M ■* 19 N Tf (O 
CO O CM CO CM l>. i— i 




CO 


o 


OS 
CM 




00 


"ITK) psdumd 


CO 


CO co co I>- O !>■ t-- 


00 


t^ 


CO 


CO 


1 


1^ 


A^T^UBTIQ 






7—1 














Hg 


8gl3J8Ay A"pi3Q 




















s* 












































•(suof 


CM 


I>- O CM CO O 00 00 


1— t 


rH 


y— f 


OS 


o 






CO 


00 I— fr- t- CO C5 i-< 


!>. 




CM 


->* 


o 




3 25 


-1*0 uoHIM) 


00 


t>. 00 00 CO O CO CM 


Ui 


CO 


OS 


OS 


CM 


1 


3 


dijg joj pa^oaj 


i—l 


i— 1 i— 1 i— 1 CM CO CM CM 


CM 


CM 




T-H 


CO 
CM 




-joo 'padumd 




















P 


A^T^u-BriQ l^^ox 






















•Sui^qgi^i 


o 
o 


S i i 


I l S 


1 


o 


o 


1 


1 


o 


jo Suryeen joj uoi^orip 


o 


o 


o 




o 


o 






o 


-8Q OU .' ^U8OI80 , B[dStQ 


o 


o 

CO 


o 

00 




o 

o 


o 

OO 






o 

oo 


laSunjjj jo STs^g uo 


os 


CO 


t~- 




OS 


*"i 






M< 


TtJOQ jo spunoj 001 Jed 


CO 


CO 


o" 




CM 

CO 


CO 






CO 


spunod-^oo^ ui a^tiq 




















•Sut^hStt; jo Sui 


o 

o 


§ ' ' 


1 I S 
o 


1 


o 

o 


o 
o 


1 


1 


o 
o 


-^B8|j joj uox^onpoQ 


o 


o_ 


o_ 




o 


o 






o 


ou :dqg joj pa^oajjoo 
•paoo jo epunoj OOI J8d 


CO 

CO 


O0 


C35 




"* 

■* 








o 

OS_ 


spunod-^ooj ut A^nQ 


CO 


co 


CO 




CO 


CO 






CO 




■* 


CO 


t^ 




CO 


t^ 






CO 




kO 


CO 


CO 




■>* 


o 






o 


•(lasj) wn oSbjqav 


CO 


1 1 


1 1 

CO 


1 


t^ 


I>^ 


1 


1 


OS 




00 


00 


r^ 




t^ 


t^ 






t^ 




CM 


CM 


CM 




CM 


CM 






CM 


■Sui^uSiq; 


CO 
CM 


o 


05 
O 




O 


OS 






OO 


jo Sui^boh joj uoponp 


^ 


ui ' ' 


1 ' n4 


1 


CO 


00' 


1 


1 


ui 


-8Q ou ! [BOQ J° punoj 


•* 


"* 


CD 




CO 

T— i 


Tfi 






-* 


jed paduind suone£) 






















!>. 


CO 


■?— t 




C5 


CO 






^ 


•J85JUI[3 


!>. 


t^ ' ■ 


1 ' ' ^ 


1 


OS 


o 


1 


1 


OS 


puB sausy jo "].u&q jaj 






















OS 


00 I I 


i i i i>- 


I 


r^ 


o 


1 


i— l 


1 




CO 


(M 






■>* 


CO 








•(spunoj) 


OS 


°l 


CO 




■>* 


lO 




»o 




jo3{ut[Q pus saqsy 












o 




7— 1 






o 


© 1 ] 


1 1 1 o 


1 


»o 


o 


1 


>o 


1 




CO 




CO 




CM 


b- 




OS 




•(spunoj) 
pauinsuoo jboq 


O 
CM 


CO 
US 
CM 


OS 

oo" 




CO 
■>* 
CM 


°1 
co" 




00_ 

CO 




"(SUOflBQ 


US 


00 

CO 


»o 




CO 


CO 

o 




T-H 


' 


uonilH) d HS J0 J P9^09J 


CO 


CO 


1—1 




CO 


00 


' 


O 




-joo 'padumd Ajt^utrnQ 






















ri o 


O 1 I 


1 1 1 o 


1 


lO 


lO 


] 


O 


1 




• rt CO 


o 


CO 






xsM 




o 






§ 


















•8UUX Smdranj ps^ox 
























OS I I 


1 1 1 CO 




o 


o 




Tfl 


1 




>H CO 


CO 


T* 




CM 


OS 




CO 






W ~ 










CM 




t^ 




a 


















H 


















£ 


















O 


















§ 






















*H 

c3 

d 

•-9 


fc S <l 8 h h <1 


CD 

a 

CD 

a 

CD 
02 


CD 

o 

+3 

o 

o 


CD 

S 
CD 

> 

O 




a 

CD 

o 

CD 
P 


"3 
o 
H 


as 
03. 

CD' 
> 
< 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



151 



CD 

o 



•gui^uSig jo Sui^ajj jo j 


o 
o 


o 
© 


o 
© 


o 
o 


o 

CO 


o 
o 


o 
o 


O 
O 


O 

o 


CO 

o 


o 

o 


o 
o 


i 


o 
o 


UOT^OnpQQ OU i%U3V0LQ0'B\d 

-siq jaSunfj jo sisBg uo 


o 
o 

OO 


© 

o 

CM 


o 
o 
o 


o 
o 

OS 


o 
o 


o 
o 

CM 


o 
o 


CO 

o 

CM 


o 


o 
o 


CO 

o 

CM 


o 
o 

CM 




o 

o 

CM 


'11300 jo spunoj 001 J9d 


© 


CO 


o 


CO 

o 


"^1 

CO 




t^ 




t-^ 


•«tl 


UO 


00 






spunod-^ooj ui A n Q 


CO 


*# 


*# 


lO 


LO 


CO 


U0 


U0 


UO 


U0 


uo 


*# 




U0 


•Sui^qSyj 


o 


CO 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


i 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


CO 


o 


o 




CO 


jo Sui^ajj joj uoi^onp 
-8Q oxi idijg joj pa^oajjoo 
'P?oq jo spunoj 001 ^ d 


o 
o 

CO 

es 

00 


o 

o" 

CO 
OO 

uo 


o 
o 

°i 


o 
o 

CO 
CO 

02~ 


o 
o 

CD 
CM 


o 
cT 

CM 


o 
o 

CO 
CD 


o 
o 

U0 


o 
o 

CD 
UO 


o 

o 
o 

CO 


o 

o 


o 

o 

00 

CO 




CO 

o 

CO 

uo 

o 


gpunod-^oojj ux A^riQ 


CO 


■* 


-<tl 


-* 


lO 


CD 


U0 


uo 


U0 


U0 


U0 


"* 




uo 


& 




OS 


T}H 


■* 


CO 


00 


O 


UO 


CO 


CO 


t^ 


CD 


CR 




T-H 


& 




"* 


o 


t^ 


■* 


O0 


-* 


CM 


CO 




t^ 


o 


CM 




!>• 


H? • 


"H "°N 9ui§u3 


o 


,_; 


C5 


c= 


^H 


CO 


o 


Oi 


o 


o 


^h' 


^h' 


i 


o 






CM 


CM 






CM 


CM 






CM 


CM 


CM 


CM 




CM 


H 






























'""' 




OO 


o 


CQ 


1^ 


C35 




o 


o 




CO 




o 




00 




o 


CM 


o 


o 


C32 




o> 


U0 




00 




CM 




CO 


w 

< 


■gj -OJST ouiSua 


00 


CO 


C2 


o 


o 


1 


05 


U0 


1 


^ 


1 


l>- 


i 


CO 






CM 




CM 












CM 




CM 




CM 




1— I 


1-1 


" H 


1-1 


1-1 




t-H 


^ 




1— t 




1-1 




tH 


•Sui 


t^ 


CD 


o 


OO 


o 


CM 


00 


Tt< 


a> 


,_, 


O0 


t^ 




t^. 


-^uSiq; jo Supuajj joj uoiq. 


^ 


CO 


■* 


OO 


t^ 


CM 


o 


^ 


T— 1 


t~ 


*■"! 


CM 


i 


O0 


-DUpaQ OU : J1300 JO pUTlOJ 


OO 


O 

uo 


00 




o 

U0 


o 


o 

CO 


OO 


U0 

CO 


00 
CO 


o 

o 


CO 
CD 




CM* 

o 


jad paduind suojpsf) 


CO 


*# 


■<* 


TM 


lO 


CO 


uo 


uo 


U0 


UO 


U0 


"* 




uo 




■* 


t^ 


CO 


•* 


t^ 


-* 


I>. 


U0 


CM 


Tt< 


00 


^H 




U0 


•J95{UnO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


■* 


CO 


CM 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CM 


rt 


CO 




CO 


pue saqsy jo - ^uao jaj 
































<* 


US 


00 


OS 


C75 


t- 


o 


o 


Tfl 


o 


t^ 


t^ 


O0 


1 


•(spunoj) 


© 


CM 


t^ 


CD 


Oi 


-* 




U0 


OS 


CM 


CO 


CM 


CO 




■* 


t^ 


lO 


CO 


lO 


^ 


t^ 


CD 


U0 


CM 


co 


•>* 


t-» 




jaj[UTj3 pwe sausy p^oj, 


00 


UO 


m 


lO 


IC 


"5 


uo 


uo 


uo 


U0 


-# 


uo 


OO 
CO 






T(H 


o 


CO 


TjH 


00 


U0 


o 


•tfl 


o 


00 


CD 


^ H 


CD 


I 




t^- 


o 


OO 


OO 


■* 


»o 


CO 


U0 


T* 


o 


OO 


CO 


CM 




•(spunoj) 


t^ 


t~ 


o 


-* 


OS 


t^. 


uo 


o 


CO 


o 


r- l 


uo 


■*f 


































pauinsuoo psoo l^oj, 


UO 


•* 


Tt< 


CO 


■* 


^ 


■* 


Tt< 


Ttl 


■"* 


CO 


■<*! 


o 

uo 






© 


00 


CO 


•>*< 


iO 


o 


CO 


C5 


CO 


CO 


o 


■* 


t--. 




"(suonBO uoniTH) 


00 


t~ 


CN1 


its 


»o 


t^ 


o 


l^ 


CD 


CO 


CO 


CM 


CO 


1 


paduind ^t^u'enQ re^oj. 


© 


00 


o 


i-H 


CM 
CM 


CD 
CM 


CM 
CM 


CM 


CM 
CM 


CM 
CM 


C75 


I-H 


U0 
U0 
CM 




i—i 


•(suon^o uoniTK) 


CM 

© 






C3i 




o 


o 
o 


CO 
CO 


CO 

CO 


CO 

uo 


o 

CO 


CO 

o 


CM 




dijg joj pa^oajjoo 


^H 


© 


^H - 


CM 


iO 


CD 


^ 


^H 


CM 


r~ 


C35 


05 


OS 




6 


'paduind ifyi^uimQ 


^ 




T— ' 


rt 




CM 


CM 


CM 


CM 


^ 


r— i 




C2 


































a 




S"3 


UO 


o 


UO 


»o 


o 


o 


U0 


U0 


o 


UO 


U0 


o 


1 


z 




gCM 


CM 


»o 


CM 


CO 


CO 


CO 


■* 


CM 


CO 


-CH 


CM 


CO 




3 


•auiix Suidranj p^oj, 
























OS 




% 




tn<33 


UO 


o 




o 


CO 


^*1 


r^ 




CO 










w 




M co 


uo 


CO 


O0 


CO 


00 


t~ 


OO 


r~ 


U0 


"* 


U0 


CO 


1 




fflco 


CM 


CO 


CO 




"0 


uo 


U0 


U0 


M< 


UO 


uo 


uo 






•(suon«0 u0 Hl!K) 


© 


CO 


O0 




o 




CO 

o 


CD 




o 




OO 


CO 




i-i 


^TTS JO J pa^oajjoo 


t^ 


OS 


00 


CO 


l~- 




rt 






uo 






CD 




o 


'paduind jtyi^uimQ 




























































H 




9 "3 


W 


U0 


o 


lO 


1 


o 


uo 


1 


o 


1 


CO 


uO 


1 


B 




s* 


1-1 


*■* 




CO 




o 


,_l 




U0 




o 


O 




H 


•aunj, Suiduinj p^ox 




























^ 




"3 CM 


CO 


iC 


i-H 


CM 


1 


CM 


■* 


1 


<35 


1 


CO 




1 


H 




>2 uo 


00 


lO 


OS 


CD 




CM 






CM 












^n^ 


CM 


CM 


1—1 


^* 










^ 










W 

z 
o 




























o 








H 

9 
Q 
n 

1-3 


>> 

u 

3 

M 


o 

B 






a 


1-3 


CO 

< 


u 
o 
£> 

a 

0> 

ft 

o 


a 
£> 
o 

o 

O 


u 

a 

S 
o 


i-T 

a 

o> 
o 
o> 

Q 


'rt 
o 


tD 

a 

M 
C 



152 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



<V) 




r«! 




-to 




SS5 




rO 


s~-^ 


•^ 


?>- 


<¥> 


^V 


•<s> 




r*-o 




», 


© 


A 


le; 


s 




co 


14) 
r*«o 




rO 


co 


rs 


s 


^ 


o 


<w 


^s 


<o 

CO 


'To- 


HO 


ff 


•<s> 


© 


-to 




oo 


CO 


•«■* 


•<s> 


^ 






•<s> 


s- 


o 


<4> 




« 


<50 


fe 


tO 






S? 


K 


^ 


•<s> 


HO 




•<S> 


CO 

-to 


o 


•<S> 


^ 


!s- 


*- 



s^ 



>to 

© Q 
3 

CO 

© 



a 



3 

CO 

^o JO 

S^ 

^ ©~ 

©» ^ 

S- 

cq fe 

<4i <S 



1 


£ 




© 


iO 


•<s> 


CN 


^o 

© 




©H 


O 


<o 


£ 


-to 


H 


^ 


t-5 




ffl 




< 





Ph M ra 

ij ■< % 

« « M 



fc o . 

« w K 

w ^ t> 

& 3 « 



X 



H 



H « 

W H 

O W 



§1 

a h 

Eh«2 
13 W 

° 5 

GO H 

w 



« S 

II 



o £ 
GO o 



a 

.2 -£- 

a^-S a 

a ^o 



T3 B 

© o 

s| 
Wf2 






C- Oi c*. o 



O i-H l-H 



IC T-H 1-H 

(M i-l <-l 



B 
Sin 



B2 



-5— S M _ S B 
B B-^^3 B £=5 

■S ^^ pqO 



« b2 « 

B 0^5 g 

gW2o 



fl « to^SS B 



bgfj 



t- o 

©B3 
B 03 

oO 



-2 ^3 

B c -* B 

^g-2§^ fi g 
© o tf -s -+5 o 5 

.g-g O g g^-2 

B B O © 

^ c3 pq 







t« B 

° ^: 

03 O 

B +» 

.2 © 

^6 



-■ge. 



© © ©-2 f; o S" 

lols^g^o 



cq ih ^-i 



<M r-l tH 



CNI t— I i— t 



B g . 

O.B CQ © rt 

ta BM B ©^ 

P r, -p ^ H cj 



Cj 



7— I 1— I •"# 



03 

B 
B 
03 



,B - 



a 



P 
M 

B 



a 1 



o 



c3 


o 


^ 


© 
-B 




o 


•+J 


Ph 


© 


o 




rrl 


+J 


B 


f-H 


B 


O 


© 




a 

.2 
v> 

OS 


bl) 
o3 

© 
> 


B 

l-H 


> 
OS 





rt-S 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



153 



CO 



© 

© 



© 

^3 



©^ 

©s 



co 

© 

"©• 
© 






© 

to 

©, 
g 

3 

co 

© 



©5 

© 



^ 



CO 
•cO 
CO 

© 






CD 



O 



Ob 



Q 




02 


K 


o 


fc 


u 


CO 


o 


ft 


te~ 


ft 
3 


£ 








r* 






© 


H 


*# 


P 


to 


a 


CO 



o 



03 

n ft 
Ph S 1 

U 



o3 

Q 



Ph 



CO 1-1 1— I i-H 



o3 

A* ft 

O 



03 

P 



Ph 



c<i <m cvi ca 







o3 






fH.~S 




50 


«* ft 

Ph 03 


o 


iZ! 


o 




O 

►J 
ft 




>> 


CO 


<J 


o3 




C 


P 

Ph 



i-H CO OS 









03 








h.tn 


««j 






„° ft 
Ph o3 


w 


e 


£ 


O 


en 


i-i 


o 




ft 


©> 


ft 
ft 
•3 




w 
w 


(O 

CO 


>> 

03 


u 







Q 

*H 

o 

Ph 







03 






fe.-S 






n° ft 

Ph 03 


o 


& 


o 


LA 

ao 


o 

ft 

S3 




>> 

03 




o 


P 
Ph 



CO t-H i-H 









03 








>-."S 


w 

ft 






«® ft 

Ph o3 


ft 


o 


izi 


U 


> 


CO 
IO 


o 
ft 
ft 






c3 

P 





oo 


< 


EC 






u 

Ph 



« ft 

Ph o3 

o 



o3 
P 



Ph 



03 ft 



i 

<5 


^2 

s 

ft 
(1) 
cc 


a> 
o 

o 


s 

o 


J2 

6 

P 


f-t 

o 



154 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



-"3 
CP 



.3 

'■+3 

d 

o 

O 



e 

CO 

o 
8 



o 



8 

o 



e 



CO 

d 









03 




































t-l ~ f ~' 


o 


CO 


CM 


<M 


00 


t--. 


CO 


CO 


t^ 


© 


© 


© 


1 — ( 




ft 
o 


o 


03 


Ph ot 

o 


"3 


us 


lO 


lO 


lO 


t^ 


!>. 


!>• 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 




EH 


esi 

00 


O 
































>> 


o 


o 


© 


© 


© 


©> 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 




5 




03 


o 


o 


© 


© 


©1 


© 


© 


© 


©1 


© 


© 


© 


© 




£ 


P 


us 


CO 


CO 


CO 

©" 


CO 
O0 


oo 
© 


00 


its 

© 


© 


CO 
CO 


TH 


CO 


00 

cm" 










tn 


OO 




© 




l^ 




us 


>ra 


© 








CM 










O) 


lO 


CO 


CO 


© 


CO 


© 


oo 


00 


00 


t» 


t>. 


t^ 


t~ 










Ph 








































03 




































^ ft 

Ph o3 
O 


Co 


f-H 


v-H 


CO 


TJH 


t- 


>o 


© 


-* 


rt< 


©I 


US 


© 




O 


o 

CO 

to 


05 

iZ! 
O 


CO 


■* 


TJ< 


CO 


<* 


-* 


CO 


CO 


■>* 


Tt< 


CO 


CO 


"* 




>> 


© 


o 


© 


© 


© 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 




s 


00 


3 


o3 


o 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


<© 


© 


© 


© 


© 






P 


©_ 


CM 


CO 


°1 


© 


OS 


t^ 


00 


CM 


CM 


lO 


CO 


1>^ 










Cm" 




<m" 




©" 


00 


•* 


CM 


© 


TjT 


© 


CO 


CO 










t-l 


CO 


"0 


»o 


1— I 


oo 


© 


© 




l>. 


00 


CO 


© 


-* 










o 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


■* 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 










0< 








































03 




































r? ft 

Ph o3 


ta 


o 


rJH 


CO 


I-~ 


t^ 


CM 


OO 


IC 


© 


us 


t^ 


CO 




o 




93 


US 


CO 


lO 


»o 


© 


© 


t^ 


© 


00 


o. 


US 


us 


CO 




H 


o 


I? 


O 






























s 




O 
































>> 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 




ij 


< 
CD 


oS 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 




S 




P 


© 


© 


»o 


lO 


© 


CM 


lO 


oo 


"* 


lO 


co 


CO 


US 


































«i 






lO 


lO 


Oi 


© 


t^ 


00 


U0 


© 


TJH 


00 


US 


t^ 


© 








m 


o 


CO 


© 


CM 


CO 


l« 


CO 


oo 


© 




CM 


"*l 


CO 










Q 


t-- 


t^ 


CO 


t^ 


oo 


CM 


© 


00 




© 


t^ 


!>. 


00 










Ph 












r-H 






^* 






















03 






























fc 






11 


1-H 


CM 


CO 


»o 


© 


r^ 


t^. 


oo 


-* 


i-H 


00 


© 


O0 








CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


!>. 


© 


© 


t^. 


!>. 


CO 


© 


CO 




£ 




03 






























o 


o 


fc 


o 


































O 






























































H 
H 




J 


>> 


o 


© 


© 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 




<j 


03 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 









P 




CO 


CO 


t>. 


CO 


CM 


CO 


CM 






© 


US 


O0 


































£ 






»o 


00 


© 




CO 


•* 


© 


CM 


US 


© 


"# 


00 


"*l 








t-l 


r^ 


oo 


«s 


CO 


© 


1— 1 


f^ 


O0 


!>• 


CO 


<© 


© 


00 










co 


00 


oo 


© 


© 


© 




© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 










Ph 












r« 






"5" 


^" 




~ 
















03 




































*■"."£ 


CO 


CO 


© 


f~ 


CM 


CM 


CM 


^1 


© 


CO 


o 


** 


CM 










4° ft 

Ph 03 

O 


t>. 


00 


CO 


© 


t^ 


00 


oo 


00 


r~ 


© 


CO 


© 


t- 






© 


03 
































(O 


O 
































>> 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 




CM 


5 



03 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


©1 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 




Pi 


P 


lO 


T~l 


CO 


■^ 


l~- 


■* 


lO 


'I 


*-i 


CM_ 


©_ 


oo 


© 












US 


©" 


© 


© 


•*" 






t^ 




© 


US 












M 


CO 


CM 


Oi 




CO 


-* 


CO 


-* 


■«* 


CM 


© 


<© 


us 










CD 


US 


t^ 


CO 


-* 


»o 


t^ 


!>. 


t^ 


CO 


■* 


CO 


CO 


US 










P-i 








































03 




































«H."S 


"3 


t>- 


CO 


© 


r^ 


lO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


■* 


(M 


-dH 


US 




H 




03 


»P ft 

Ah 03 


«o 


kO 


»o 


-* 


lO 


© 


«o 


U5 


US 


US 


"5 


us 


US 




O 


o 


fc 


o 






























eo 
en 

































































J 


«T 


►J 


>> 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 




H 




03 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 




§ 




P 


Tfl 


OS 


00 


lO 


CO 


1-- 


lO 


lO 


lO 


IC 


OS 


© 


lO 








o 


CO 


oo" 


©" 


IC 


CO 


CM 


co" 


•>*" 


CM* 


r^T 


00 


CM 










u 


CM 


CO 


© 


CO 


us 


© 


lO 


© 


•* 


CM 


00 




CO 










o 


© 


© 


00 


00 


© 




C5 


oo 


CS 


© 


00 


© 


OS 










Ph 












** 
























W 




































EH 




































S5 




































o 




































kH 




































S 


























03 




fl 
































<B 

>> 




O 

-1-3 
(H 
O 

>> 

o 


c 

.2 
v> 

a 
o 
Ph 






Eh 

03 

03 
l-B 


u 
03 
3 

Ph 


o 
03 


ft 


>> 

03 


a 


1-5 


-t-T 

02 

M 




a 

CD 

ft 
CP 

W 


o 
a 

O 


CB 

B 

> 
o 

J? 


CD 

e 

o 
o 

p 


CD 

o 
Ph 





No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



155 



< 






03 


o 


OS 


<N 


!>. 




00 


T« 


CO 


CO 


t— i 


t~ 


»o 


■<* 








o 

T-H 


o 

T-H 


OS 


00 


OS 


OS 


OS 


OS 


OS 


OS 


oo 


OS 


OS 


o 


05 


O 




























£ s 


oo 


ft 




























ft H 


tH 


O 


























































■** 


pj 




o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


O 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


° s 


eo 


►J 


>> 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


O 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


K » 


lH 


<! 


03 


<M 


CO 


M< 




lO 


lO 


OO 


o 


Ttl 


id 


»o 


CO 




^Q 
































O 


« 


CO 


CO 


o 


1— i 


CM 


CM 


<# 


CM 


CO 


CO 


o 




CO 








CO 


00 


CO 


t^ 




t^ 


iO 






oo 


CO 




CO 


§ 






Fh 


CO 


o 


OS 


CO 


CO 


o 


CM 


T-H 


T— ( 


CO 


O0 




o 






as 

Ph 


CM 


CM 


CO 


00 


CO 


r— j 


CO 


CO 


OS 


-# 


OS 


00 


t~ 










CM 


o 


OS 


CO 




o 


o 


O 


o 


OS 


o 


o 



T3 

<D 


i— i 

o 
O 



■so 
<4i 






o 

£ 



-to 



fc. 



o 






^ 



CO 

6 
m 



03 

^ ft 

o 



03 

Q 



Ph 



T-H T— I OS 



o3 

« ffl ft 

O 



03 



Ph 



03 



o 



03 

Q 



Ph 



-* T-H T-H 



03 

f? ft 

Ph o3 

o 



c3 
Q 



Ph 



^) ^^ •^f, ^H 






Ph o3 
O 

o3 

Q 



Ph 



OS T-H t-H 



a 3 

i-s Ph 



ft 



wh ^ 



a ^ ™ p, 



11 s s 

-goo 
O S 



Ph 



156 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



e 

Oi 

s- 

■^3 



Ob 



I- 

HO 

CO 






£ © 

"•^ ^ 

© 2 

©. 5 s 

© S> -T 

so ° 

S5 © 



-3 



•2 "» 

-2 GO 

SS CQ 

5 e 






a 

m 



"cl 

o 






O 
H 

m 
< 





o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


lO 




o 


o 


o 


CO 


CO 


o 


CO 


CO 


o 


o 


CO 


o 


CO 


CM 






o 


o 


o 


CO 


CO 


o 


CO 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


oo 


Oi 


































«5 


co" 


00 


i>r 


c; 


oT 


o 


CM 


o 


CM 


CM 


!>• 




t^ 


CM 




O 


t>. 


CM 


1^ 


r^ 


O0 


OI 


CO 


t^ 


t^ 


o 


t- 


CM 


t^ 


CM 




o> 




t- 


OJ 




lO 


lO 


o 


1C 


t^ 


CO 


-* 


t^ 


CM 


Oi 




iH 


































lO 


CM 




r^ 




>ra 


t-- 


co 


CO 


CO 


co 


•>* 


o 









CM 


CM 




o 




o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 










o 


O 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


CO 




o 


CO 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


CO 


oo 






o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


t^ 


































CM 


«»3 

e 


lO 


00 




CO 


CM 


CM 


o 


lO 


CM 


o 


»o 


"* 


lO 


t^ 


co 


co 


CO 


lO 


Oi 


o 


■* 


-# 


lO 


CO 


!>. 


CO 


-* 


o 




en 


■* 


CM 


"^1 




CO 


o 


CO 


o 


t^ 


>o 




-* 


CO 


Oi 






































00 


t^ 


oo 


CO 


CO 


o 


oo 


i>r 


r^ 


CO 


>o 


lO 


o 












o 


o 


o 




o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


CM 










o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


CM 




o 


o 


CO 


CO 


o 


CO 


o 


o 


CO 


o 


CO 


o 


o 


** 






o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


co- 


o 


o 


CO 


o_ 


o 


o 


o 


t^ 


!>■' 
































y*j 


i-l 


»o 


r-- 


OS 


t^ 


t~- 


co 


►o 


lO 


CO 


Oi 


M< 


oo 


lO 


CM 


o 


t^ 


Oi 


o 


^H 


CO 


<M 


o 


T— 1 


o 


O0 


CM 


CO 


■* 


Oi 




en 


cm 


■* 


lO 


CO 


»o 


TP 


Oi 


oo 




CO 


CO 


CM 


CO 


oo 






































t~ 


IC 


CO 


»o 


CO 


CO 


OI 


CM 


co" 




CO 


-* 












CO 


OS 


Oi 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 




o 








1-1 


*-H 


1-1 




























o 


O 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


00 


t>. 




o 


o 


CO 


o 


o 


o 


CO 


o 


CO 


o 


CO 


CO 


CO 


Oi 






o 


o 


CO 


o 


o 


o 


CO 


CO 


CO 


o_ 


o 


CO 


o 


CD 




































o 
o 


lO 


«5 


CO 


t^ 


o 




CD 


i>r 


cm" 


oo~ 


00 


-*l 


Oi 


t^ 




"3 


■* 


lO 


Oi 


OO 


oo 


oo 


^-H 


J—i 


>o 


•* 


•* 


lO 


r~ 




en 


o 


Oi 


r~ 


■* 


t~ 


lO 


«>. 


r^ 


CO 


CO 


CO 


00 


(O 


00 






































o 


OO 


lr^ 


OS 


r-~ 


oo 


(^ 


CM 


CO 


O0 


CO 


t- 


CO 








o 


Oi 


OS 


00 


oo 


Oi 


o 


o 


o 


Oi 


Oi 


Oi 


Oi 








1-1 












1-1 


* H 


1-1 
















o 


O 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


00 




o 


o 


CO 


o 


o 


o 


o 


CO 


o 


o 


CO 


o 


o 


t^ 






o 


o 


o 


CO 


o 


o 


o 


o 


CO 


o_ 


<o 


o 


o 


oo 


b~ 
































o 


en 


CM 


Tt< 


CO 




oo 






CM" 


00 


o" 


oT 


o 




■* 


en 


rtn 


lO 


o 


Oi 


•"# 


Oi 


CM 


t^ 


t^ 


00 




■* 




lO 




00 


Tt< 


•>*l 


CM 


T* 


•* 


CO 


oo 


o 


•* 


lO 


t^ 


00 




oo 




iH 


































CO 


CO 


o 


CD 


Oi 


r^ 


CD 


CM 




Oi" 


co 


lO 


<M 








Oi 


o 


C5 


O0 


00 


Oi 


Oi 


Oi 


Oi 


00 


OO 


00 


Oi 








o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


CM 


lO 




o 


o 


o 


o 


CO 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


"* 






o 


o 


o 


o 


CO 


o 


o 


CO 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 
































o 


00 


o 


o 


oo 


•* 


1^ 


CO 


00 


oo 


CD 


o 


t^ 


"2 




CM 


en 


oo 


t^ 


CO 


t^ 


t^ 


CO 


CM 


l« 


Oi 


t>- 


t^ 


lO 


lO 


CO 




00 


00 


*# 


■<* 


«5 


CO 


■>* 


CM 


lO 


CM 


t^ 




CO 


CD 


O0 




tH 


































CO 


t^ 


o 


CO 


CD 


CO 


00 


t^ 


oo 




00 


CO 


CO 








oo 


00 


00 


t^ 


t- 


OO 


oo 


O0 


00 


oo 


t^ 


00 


00 








o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


CO 


oo 




o 


o 


CO 


o 


o 


o 


CO 


CO 


o 


o 


CO 


o 


o 


1— 1 






o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


CO 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


CM 


Oi 
































Oi 


e'- 


CD 


t^ 




•<tl 


CM 


CM 


lO 


CO 


CO 




CM 


"* 


CO 


Oi 


en 


CO 


CO 


"2 




«>. 


»o 


CM 


o 


Oi 


»o 


CO 


Oi 


Oi 


o 




00 


co 


Oi 


t^ 


Oi 


t^ 


Oi 


lO 




CM 


o 


t~ 


lO 


tr^ 


OO 






































»o 


CO 


CM 


Oi 


CD 


t^ 


lO 


■* 


■* 


Oi 


CM 


CD 


o 








O0 


00 


OO 


t^ 


t^ 


!>. 


00 


oo 


oo 


t^ 


!>. 


I-~ 


O0 








o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


»o 


t^ 




o 


o 


o 


CO 


o 


CO 


o 


o 


o 


o 


CO 


o 


CO 


OO 






o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


O 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


© 


CO 


Oi 
































Oi 


<o 


co 






Oi 


CM 


oT 


o 


l>r 


o 


CM 


CO 


Oi 


o 


CO 


Cn 
00 


■<* 


CM 


rH 


CM 


o 


CO 


o 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


■* 


CD 


00 




Oi 


o 




»o 


TJH 


CO 


o 


»o 




t^ 


Oi 


TH 


CO 


t>. 






































CM 


t-~ 


CO 


t^ 


CO 


t^ 


o 


00 


Ttl 




T— 1 


Oi 


00 








00 


00 


00 


t^ 


l>- 


!>• 


O0 


tr^ 


t^ 


t^ 


t>. 


t^ 


t-^ 








o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


r^ 


o 




o 


o 


CO 


o 


o 


CO 


o 


CO 


CO 


o 


o 


o 


o 


lO 






o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


CO 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


lO 


































Oi 


1ft 
en 

00 


O 


iO> 


CO 


Oi 


•* 


lO 


t^ 


CO 


Tj< 


00 




CO 


Oi 


CO 


CM 


t^ 


■* 


o 


Oi 


o 


CO 


CO 


CM 


CM 


oo 


-5f 


Oi 


CD 




Oi 


CO 


lO 


Oi 




Oi 


CO 


CM 


t^ 


o 


O0 


•* 


"^1 


!>. 




































OO 


o 


OS 


CM 


lO 


Oi 


Oi 


CM 


CO 


t~-T 


•>* 


o 


oT 








CO 


oo 


CO 


CD 


CD 


CO 


CO 


t^ 


t^ 


CD 


CO 


(^ 


o 








o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


■* 


o 




o 


CO 


o 


o 


CO 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


CO 


CO 


>o 






o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


CO 


oo 
































oo 


** 


CO 


>* 


o 


lO 


CO 


Oi 


CM 


Ui 


t>- 


»o 


i-H 


oo 


CM 


CO 


en 


o 


■<*< 






!>. 


CM 


Th 


Oi 


CO 


CO 


CO 


o 


00 


■># 




00 


lO 


Oi 


t^ 


t^ 


CO 


CO 


CD 


°l 


1-H 


t^ 


CM 




CO 


t^ 




iH 


































t^r 


oo 


CM 


r^ 


o 


O0 


CO 


i>r 


t^ 


CM 


CM 


lO 


lO 








CO 


CO 


CO 


ui 


CO 


CO 


t^ 


CO 


CD 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CD 








o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


CO 


>o 




o 


o 


o 


CO 


CO 


o 


CO 


CO 


o 


CO 


CO 


o 


o 


VO 






CD 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 




































Oi 


«*» 


Oi 


o 


oo 


Oi 


l« 


■"tfl 


CO 


CO 


T* 


o 


Tt< 


o 


lO 


CO 


en 

00 


o 


o 


CO 


o 


CM 


t^ 


-CW 


oo 


lO 


!>. 


o 


o 


CD 


CM 




CM 


Oi 


CO 


CO 


o 


CO 


CO 


os 


CO 


t~ 


CM 


r~ 


▼—I 


t^ 






CO 


,— , 


t^ 


CM 


,-H 


CO 


Oi 


CO 


■* 


CO 


T^ 


CO 


CO 








t>. 


t^ 


CO 


CD 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CD 


o 


CO 


CD 


CO 






O 




- 






























>> 

t-l 


a 
>-> 


Ph 

CJ 


o 


't-c 

a 
< 


>, 


of 

a 

i-s 


1-5 


m 
do 

< 


u 

<3i 

s 

o 
a 

CO 


u 
co 

-Q 
o 

o 


CD 

B 

0) 

> 

o 

55 


CD 

a 

u 

CO 

Q 


co" 

bJJ 

c3 

CO 

> 

< 


a 
.2 

'•+3 

3 
a 
o 


+i 

"a 

03 

o 
u 

CO 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



157 



I— H 

S3 

o 

o 





o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


O 


O 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


,_, 






o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


O 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


t^ 








o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


t^ 


CM 


































C5 




**< 


!>. 


CO 


co 


OS 




lO 


CO 


CD 


CO 




oo 




as 


t^ 




iH 


O0 


OO 


o 


o 


CM 


CD 


CO 


O0 


t~ 


■* 


CM 


■* 


oo 


t^ 






CJ» 


CO 


o 




CD 


00 




CM 


t^ 


oo 


(M 


CM 


t^ 


■^1 


*-H 






iH. 




































t- 


l>- 


o 


CO 


lO 


Th 


co 


lO 


C35 


lO 




oo 


oi" 












CM 




o 


o 




O 


o 


O 


o 


O 


o 


o 










o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


O 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


CM 






o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


O 


o 


o 


C3 


o 


05 








o 


o 


o 


© 


o 


o 


o 


o 


O 


o 


o 


o 


o 


■* 


CO 


































05 




CO 


02 


CO 




CO 


1—1 


CO 


rd 


o 


C5 


CD 




o 


CO 


CM 






00 


1—1 


t^ 


O0 


i-H 


OS 


00 


co 


■^1 


lO 


TH 


00 


CD 


lO 






o 

iH 


-* 


t^ 


00 


o 


CO 


i-H 


o 


CD 


-* 


t^ 


"^1 


Th 


■<*< 










































CO 


o 


t^ 


■* 


TjJ" 


OO 


CM 


CO 


»c 


CO 




CM 


1^ 












CM 


o 


o 


o 


o 




O 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 










o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


i—l 






o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


CD 


t^ 








o 


o_ 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


•^1 


in 




iH 

en 

iH 






























o 




i>r 


o 


TtT 


00 


oo 


CO 




OO 


CM 


o 


Oi 


■*" 


CO 


oo 




1^ 


<# 


o 


o 


■>* 


OS 


CD 


co 


UO 


CM 


00 




^|H 


CM 






CM 


"* 


oo 


CO 


ira 


t^ 


CM 


C5 


CO 


(M 


CM 


r—* 


lO 


T— 1 








t^ 


1-H 


CM 


CO 


-* 


oo 


O 


CM 


CM 


o 


OS 


o 


oo 


y—i 








CO 


^ 


CM 


1— 1 






CM 


i-rt 


i—i 




o 


l-H 












o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


-* 






o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


CD 










o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


CM 


CO 




iH 
iH 
0) 
iH 






























CD 






OS 


OS 


CO 


us 


lO 


CM 


r— 1 


CD 


CO 


CO 


c^ 




CM 




oo 


lO 


CO 


lO 


© 


-*l 


id 


o 


CM 


ir- 


t^ 


OS 


lO 


o 






cm 


CO 


CO 


CO 


o 




o 


o 


t^ 


oo 


CO 


lO 


05 










































CO 


•># 


CO 




O0 


■* 


CO 




OO 


CO 


lO 


■<tl 


CO 










CM 


CM 










CM 




o 


o 


o 


o 












o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


O 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


1— 1 






o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


CD 


CO 








o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


OS 


OS 




o 
1-1 






























O 




oo 


CO 


O0 


lO 


CO 


CM 


CO 


CO 


-# 


CM*" 


oo 


■* 


O0 


CO 




CD 


05 


l-^ 


t^ 


r-- 


00 


TtH 


t^ 


CO 


CO 


CM 


05 


MO 


1^ 






lO 


o 


o 


t^- 


© 


o 


t^ 


CO 


-<5H 


CO 


«5 


o 


-<*l 


o 








































t^ 




t^ 


CM 


C<1 


"* 


CM 


oo 


CM 


CM 


l^ 




I-~ 










cm 


CO 


1—) 


i— ( 






CM 




T-H 




o 


CM 












o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


O 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


00 






o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


CM 








o 


o 


o 


© 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


-<JH 


CD* 




0> 

e 

tH 


































o 


CO 


CM 


Ui 


lO 


OS 


lO 




CO 


o> 


•* 


CO 










t>- 


CD 


-5H 


CO 


© 


lr^ 


CO 


00 


HH 


CO 


CO 


CO 


lO 


»o 






CM 


t^ 


00 


CO 


CO 


»H 


^ 


t^ 


o 


02 


CD 


t~ 


00 


o 








CO 


o 


CD 


U0 


CO 


>o 


CD 


^H 


oo 


lO 


^H 


lO 


CM* 


T— | 








CO 


CO 


CM 


CM 


CM 


CM 


CM 


CM 










CM 










o 


o 


o 


o 


O 


o 


o 


O 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


•* 






o 


o 


o 


© 


O 


o 


O 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


C5 








o 


o 


o_ 


o 


O 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


00 


i->! 




00 

o 
at 






























CM 




CO 


OS 


■>* 


CD 


o 


CO 


CM 


CO 


CM 


OS 


OS 


O0 


CM 


HO 




t^ 


OS 


oo 


CM 


"* 


Ttl 


CO 


r^ 


1^ 


00 




CD 




CM 






CO 




00 


© 


o 


oo 


CM 


o 


OS 


T—K 




"■# 


t-- 


o 








































CM 


CD 


oo 


oo 




o 


00 


OO 


C2 


"* 


t^ 


"# 


o 


1—1 








CO 


■* 


CM 


CM 


CO 


CO 


CO 


<M 


CI 


CM 




CM 


CO 










o 


o 


o 


o 


O 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


CO 






o 


CD 


o 


© 


© 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


CM 








o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


>o 


l>i 




e 

iH 






























CM 




o 


CM 


<M 


CO 


CM 


CO 


OS 


OO 






l-~ 


t- 


1—1 


l^ 




CO 


CM 


o 


»o 


o 


CM 


1^ 


ca 


lO 


lO 


CM 


o 


CO 


o 






t^ 


00 


CM 


lO 


uo 


CO 


t^ 


O 


t^ 


o 


CD 


-*1 


>o 


o 








t^ 


o 


-* 


T— ) 


CO 


>o 


oo 


,-H 


■* 


■* 


a> 


CM 


00 


v—t 








CO 


m 


CO 


CM 


CM 


C<J 


CM 


CO 


CM 


C<I 




(M 


CM 










o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


■«*H 






o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


05 








o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


CD 


■* 




o 
1-1 






























CM 




CO 


CO 


o 


00 


■<* 


CM 


CO 




»o 




CD 


lO 


"5 






o 


CD 


l-^ 


CM 


o 


00 


CM 


C5 


oo 


CD 


■* 


03 


oo 


oo 






o 


t^ 


lO 


T}H 


■<* 


oo 


t^ 


UO 


CD 


lO 


t- 


OS 


CD 


Oi 








































CO 


o 


CO 


O0 


cm 




00 


o 




CD 


CO 


o 


CM 










cm 


CO 


<M 




(M 


CM 


1— f 


CM 


CM 




1—1 


CO 


CM 










o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


O 


O 


o 


o 


o 


o 


CO 






o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


CM 








o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


C75 


t^ 




o 
en 

iH 






























C-l 

1—1 




00 


lO 


Oi 


OO 


-* 




Oi 


00 


CO 




CO 


CO 


1—1 


U0 




l^ 


C5 


t^ 


© 


o 


Tfl 


CD 


lO 


o 


o 


o 


C2 


t-~ 


>o 




00 


lO 


OO 


oo 


00 


T»H 


t^ 






CO 


CO 


CD 


CD 


OS 








































o 


o 


o 




lO 


tr^ 


"* 




o 


00 


CO 


CM 












CO 


^JH 


CM 








CM 


(M 


<M 




T—i 


CM 


CM 










o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


O 


O 


O 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


Oi 






o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


CO 


o 


o 


o 


CD 


o 


CD 








o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


00 


lO 




O 

1-1 






























CM 




1— 1 


CM 


•«* 


OO 


lO 


Oa 


->* 


CO 


00 


o 


TjT 


Oi 


-* 


t^ 




t-- 


CM 


CO 


oo 


y—i 


O 


00 


CO 


00 


en 


U0 






CO 






t-^ 


CM 


CO 


CO 


t- 


CM 


>o 


oo 


1-H 


CM 


o 






OS 








































1>- 


CO 


CO 


oo 


r— I 




CO 


CM 


Ttl 


00 


00 


»o 


00 










CO 


»* 


CM 


o 












o 


o 


CM 










W 
H 

O 


































k-j 


































S 




































CI 

a 

*-3 


>> 

S-H 

a 


a 
u 

c3 


a 
<j 








So 


u 

o 

a 

-(J 

Ch 

o 

m 


o 

s 
o 


tT 

a 

p 
o 


a 

a 




a> 
bD 
c3 
t-. 
01 


a 
_o 
'-^ 
a 

a 

o 
Ph 


i 

a 

o 
h 

0) 





03 O 

I* a 

<D ^ 

ji o 



2 

If 8 



o 




S2=5 


cj 




T) 




G 


-Q 


eS 


cS 


^ 


H 


01 


a 


u 
o 


-a 


^ 


+= 








s 


O 


13 


n 


d 


l* 


cu 


eo 


07 


P, 


n 


a> 


A 


■p 




T3 


ft 


M 


o 



id 13 



o a 

<o a 

a a 

_ ° 

T3 _Q 



3 M 



T) 


d 






r, 








r, 


fl 


Xi 


s 


2 







Cm 


a 


o 


H 


0) 



158 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



o 






05 



3 



S3 



oo 

6 

H 

pq 

< 



•ssaupj'Bjj 



•paransuoo uaSAxQ 



ooowooooii^ooteooco 

Ot— I O i— I O i— IHHHi- I O O t— I O 



OO OO 00 00 00 t— I00OMH 
O O O O O t— i O i— i i— < i— i 






•^OCONOOOtOPJO® 
CNCNICNIcOCNICOCNieNICOCNI 



O 
O « 



•sa^ij^x^i 



•so^j^tjsj 



rtOOOOOOOOOOCNOO 

oooooooooooooo 

OOOOOOOOOOOOOO 

oooooooooooooo 



OOOOCMOOOOO 

oooooooooo 
oooooooooo 
oooooooooo 



oooo oooooooooo 

OHOHrt«IMiOCJO(NINHO 

oooo. oooooooooo 

0000000000)0000 



oooooooooo 

OOi-HOCMOOi-H^HCM 

OOOOOOOOOO 

o o o o o o oo o o 



•auiiopfQ 



popuadsng 



•paAjossiQ 



'l^ox 



•aajj 



■* CO =13 IN «D OO «5 IN <£> tO OO ■* tj( O 
rtrtHNHNOCNOOHN-** 

oooooooooooooo 
oooooooooooooo 



OStDtOOlNMO^OOOO 
>Oi— ICNlCNCN|OCOCNIi-ICO 

oooooooooo 
oooooooooo 



■*0(M4000000tOO(M'>*-*tO-*i 

O^OTfOO'-INCNHO'Hr-KMO 
t-Ht^i-H^O^HOi-H-H^Hi-I^Hi-I^H 

000)00000000000 



t0(N(NO00S>O'<JI!C00 
C3INC<:rtK)00^H-HH 
i— Ir- ( i— IHHOr- Ir- I t-l i— I 

oooooooooo 



COOOXO"*»TtlOO<OOOINMO'* 
HINHNOCOCOTlHHOCOKINCD 
r- 1 I— I i-H i— I HV- 1 Ot-Ht— I^Ht— It— It-Hi— I 

OOOOOOOOOOOOOO 



i— IHHHi- I O i— I 1— It— I i—l 

oooooooooo 



(NO?Da500t»(N'*(NOOOCM(N(N 
CNCOi-H-^CMCOCMCOt-li-li— < CM CM CM 

oooooooooooooo 
oooooooooooooo 



00<OOOOtOCC*05N 
HCOMMHOHHINCN 

oooooooooo 
oooooooooo 



1 

H O 




P ^ 


fc 


Q ^ 





H K» 




COM 


H 


Ph & 


M 


o 





•UOI^TUSJ 

uo sso^ 



•I^ox 



i— I *H O t— I i-H i— l i— I O O O t— I t— I O t— I t— l O i— 1 1— I O O i— I i— I o o 



CO CO CO CM CM CO CO CO CO CO ■■# CO CO CO CO CO CO CO CO CM CO CM CM CO 



oicucjcuai-^QJeD'^aJaJaJ'^r-i 

33333+?33-£333+? r tf 

c3 c3 d c3 03 J> o3 cS £> cs3o3c« g.^ 
4^+j+j+=+s bfl-p -p bfl-p -,j +s bfl m 
CDCDCDCDCDCDcDCDCDlDCDCDCDHft 
bfl bfl bfl bfl bfl > bfl bfl > bfl bC bfl > cd 

cd a> cd cd cd t cd cd , cdcucu. 2 

^?^?^^?^? d £> j^> c .£?.£?.£? "§ J5>. 

.2.9.2.2.5^.5.5^.5.2.2^.9 

C3 03c3o3c3.o3o3 - c3 c^ c^ • c3 



(3 
. cj 
eu „2J a> ffi id a; 



■g +» ,£> += £> +?+?-£! ,D 

■ x> bfl -P bfl -p bfl bfl +j -p 
pS;cdcdcd<»cd<dcdcd 
2^>bA>bfl>>bflbA 
03 k. <B CD CD a> 

§ — ''i? ^ i? ►* ^^? f* > 

fl-^ ™ fl^» 0^,2 d d a 



CPCOCSCOCPCBCOOCDailDO cd cd 

raC3O3C303C3c3c3o3c3o3o3 ' — ' •— < 03 c3 

-P-P-p-P-p-p-p-p-p-p-p-p _Q _Q "P "P 

cdcdcdcdcdcdcdcdcdcdcdcd \3 ^ ffl « 

bAbflbflbAbflbflbflbflbjObflbflbfl .2 43 bfl bfl 

coococoojcjcoaiaJcBCBCD S a> cd cd 

>>>>>>>>>>>> yj bfl> > 



> 

£? 

» += 

rt d 



CD 0> <D CD CD 

33333 

03 c3 c3 o3 c3 
-ij -p +J +J +a 
CD CD CD CD CD 
bC bfl bD bfl bfl 

CD CD CD CD CD 
> > > > > 

ri ri ri ri rl 



[> n r) ri ?i ri n 



d o3 rf c3 o3 ^ o3 o3 c3- o3 c3 ^ ,-, 



J-H '-t— 1 M ■-*— < "-J— I '-+-1 *-t-t '-t— ( 

O 



•pj^pu^g 
xunui^'BtcE 



•^uauiipag 



•A^tptqjnx 



OONOOrtiOHUHSOlOCOW lOOOOOOOOOOi 



bflbCbflbflbCbflbflbflbflbflbflbfl bfl+i 
cocotocococQcocoajaJcccoccbjj 



+i-P bflbflbflbflbflbflbflbfl 
bflbflcococncoajcotoco 



>>>>>>>>>>p>>>a3 cbco>>>>>>>> 



-< M «? «■ -; ^ bfl bfl bfl .• bfl bfl bfl bfl 

CD*'-' CD CD CD CD • *-h • ph • i-h CD • i-h • --i ■ -h • 1-1 

rt DQ W fl fl "^ CD CO O CQ CO CO CO 

0.0000...0.... 



+= += -p -p -p -p 

M ,; ^- „• bfl bfl bfl „• bfl bfl 
.i-i CD CD OD.i-i.i-i.i-i CD.rt.rn 
mdACJaiiooiCliHai 

. o o o . . . o . . 



•uoi^oajioQ jo QV8(j 



•jaqranj^; 



tOOCONCONNNiOOINlONi 






i*OOHWIOOMNHH 






lOOOOiHIMrllifOlNNOOOrtO 
lOt^COrtOfflNMCOCMO^ON 
NO!NlOWOMNC»N>OCOCOO 
f5l»'*'*i*'n'OiO>Ot0^tONI> 



CONCIr- It-IOOOO-H^fHOO 

OJNlNtDtDOCJXOiOTf 
COCCt^OTfOOtHiOOOCNl 
NOOOOCSOICSOOOH 
rtrtiHrtHrtlNINCNICNI 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



159 



© 

03 






fe - 





o 
o 


© 




■<s> 


© 


e 


w 


s 


03 


•<s> 


u 


g 


Ph 


© 




H 




bq 




f~o 




© 




50 




'.s> 




S> 




S 




<u 




«; 




O 





C5 

6 

H 
B 









rH 


CO 


00 


■<* 


CO 


o 


CO <* 


CO 


O tH 


CO 


■>* 






•SSSUpj'BJJ 
























•pauinsuoo uaS^xQ 


00 

cm 


CM 


CO 

CO 


CO 


o 




CM OS 
CO CM 


CM 


CO lO 
CM CM 


C3 


CM 


£ 




o 


o 


l-H 


o 


o 


7— 1 


o o 


o 


fH O 


o 


o 




•S9^U^l^[ 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o o 


o 


o o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o o 


o 


o o 


o 


o 




o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o o 


o 


o o 


CD 


o 


O m 


















































H 




o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o o 


o 


o o 


o 


b- 




•sa^Bj^i^; 


U5 


»o 


i— 1 


1— 1 


02 


03 


CM O 


o 




CM 


■* 


£ 


o 


o 




T— 1 


o 


o 


o o 


o 


o o 


o 


o 




o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o o 


o 


o o 


o 


o 


•QUXlC>m£) 


OS 


■>*l 


_ 


i-H 


CO 


^H 


■>* »o 


lO 


tO OS 


1 


t^ 


CO 


CO 


-* 


■* 


co 


Th 


CO CO 


CO 


CO CO 




CO 










CM 


T* 


o 


o 


■* 


oo 


CO o 


00 


O0 I 


CO 


T-4 




Q 
O 


•papuedsng 


CM 

o 


o 


CO 

o 


o 


o 


o 


Tfl CO 

o o 


o 


CO 
CO 


o 


CO 

o 






o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o o 


CO 


o 


o 


o 




00 


to 


co 


**l 


■«* 


"<+l 


T+l CO 


00 


00 1 


oo 


t— 1 


< 

h-t 


S 


•p8AJOSSIQ 


1— 1 


CM 






t^ 


i-H 


■* US 




CO 


i-H 


CO 


O 


« 




o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o o 


o 


o 


o 


o 




o 


o 


CO 


■* 


00 


CM 


O CO 


CO 


CO ■* 


"* 


CM 


g 


<J 


•{B+OJ, 


TJ4 


Th 


TH 


<M 


oo 


CO 


CT5 O0 


CO 


t~ CO 


CO 


CO 


<J 














I—i 
















o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o o 


o 


o o 


o 


o 




CM 


CM 


CO 


00 


CN 


CO 


00 oo 


•* 


CM CM 


o 


tr~ 




■89Jj[ 




CO 


«o 


lO 






»H CM 


CM 


i-H CM 


CO 


CM 




o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o o 


o 


o o 


o 


o 






o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o o 


o 


o o 


o 


o 


H O . 


•uopxugj 


o 
o 


o 

CO 


UO 


UO 


o 




o »o 

•>* CO 


o 
o 


"5 tn 

CO o 


o 
o 


U0 


p 2j ^ 

2 > 2 


UO SSO'J 
























Ph * w 




UO 


o 


uo 


lO 


o 


>o 


UO lO 


o 


uo o 


UO 


U0 


•XB^ox 


O0 






OS 


Ol 


>* 


Y-H OS 


CO 


CO CM 


CM 


00 


O 




CO 


<* 


"* 


CO 


CO 


•* 


-* CO 


CO 


CO CO 


CO 


CO 


















73 




73 73 
























a 




a a 
















© 


03 




6 


03 d 


©' 


o3 c3 












































x 


^2 




£t 


© X 


XI 


© © 


























o3 














X 


X 


-P 

0> 


-p 

0> 


^ 


-p 

0> 


X -p 

o3 © 


-p 
© 


XJ X? 


X 










c3 


o3 


bfl 


bfl 


cS 


bfl 


-p . bfl 


bfl 


-p -p 


o3 








o 

w 


© 
bfl 


01 

bf) 


01 

> 


Oi 

> 


0> 
bfl 


01 

> 


© JJ © 
bfl s S 

o3 


© 

> 


© jj © 

bfl S bfl 

© 2 © 


© 
bfl 








© 

> 


© 

> 


>> 


>> 


01 

> 


>> 


!> 03_>> 

2? += 


>> 


> Si > 


© 

• > 




















TS 




>1 










>> 


>> 


o 


o 


>. 


>>— 2 


o 


>>i} >>,c" ; 










-p 


-p 





a 


-p 


73 


h3 ft.S 


a 


hj ftn3 


P73 

fH H 










d 


a 


+> 


+= 


a 


"3 


<=) fl -^ 


-p 


c d d 






















c3 3 ^ 




'3 ^'3 

Ph fe 








K 

O 

a 
O 




c3 




Q 


Q 




Q 


Q 


03 3 

Ph 




















73 




73 73 






















a 




a a 
























ci 




c3 cj 












a; 


0) 




o 


0) 


0> 








© 










X 


X 

If, 


6 


^2 

cj 


03 


c3 


© 

3 .2 


© 


© © 
X X 


X 










-p 


-P 


J2 


03 

bfl 


-p 


bfl 


c3 X2 


X! 


c3 c3 


HP 








73 


© 
feD 


0) 

or 


03 


bfl 


■S .J 


<S 


■p -p 
© . © 


© 
bfl 








. o 

o 


03 


01 




> 


0) 


> 
>> 


bfl+s S 


© 


bfl +2 bfl 


© 








> 
>> 


> 


bfl 

0) 

> 


>1 


©ay) 

> o3 © 

2 > 


bfl 

© 


© d © 

> a > 

03 


. >> 










-P 


-p 

.2 


-p 


-p 

(3 


■p 


-p 
o 

a 


03 
h3 ft'+i 


x> 

+2 


q3 ft^f-^ 














.s 


-p 

m 


<+H 


-p 

03 


a a a 
'3 2'3 


a 


a d a 
'3 ^'3 


C3 «*-l 














<si 








c3 












> 


> 


N 


w 


> 


w 


pq fe 


h 


fe P>H 


> 








o 


•pj'BpU'B^g 


o 


CO 


CM 


00 


1^ 


^H 


IC CM 


o 


O T-H 


o 


T+l 


w 


o 
o 


UITIUT^'B[ C J 


























-p 


-p 


■p 








-p -t- 


-p 


-p -p 


-p 










X 


X 


^ 








rd -=3 


^ 


h3 X 


X 








•^uauitpog 


bfl 


bfl 


bfl 


-p 

Xi 


-p 


4-> 

43 


bfl bfl 


bfl 


bfl bfl 


bfl 














M 




73 


03 


03 


bfl 


bfl 


bfl 


03 03 


03 


03 03 








-4 
B 

Ph 
< 






























> 


i> 


> 


02 


Oi 


CO 


> > 


> 


K* t> 


> 










+2 


+i 


■p' 






-p -p 


•p 


+J -p 















x 


^3 


^3 






X X 


X 


43 X 


X 












bll 


bll 


bll 






bfl bfl 


bl) 


bfl bfl 


bfl 








•A^ipiqjnx 


a 
o 


03 


"ot 


In 


^3 
bfl 


bfl 


Hi In 


03 


"03 "03 


In 










B 


► 


> 


> 


in 


CO 


> > 


> 


!> > 


> 










>o 


<N 


CM 


CO 


~& 


- 


CO CO 


CO 


«0 CM 


l-H 






"UOI 


l 00 ll°0 j° a ^a 


a 

c3 
1-5 


X 

o> 

Pn 


u 

a 

l-H 


ft 

< 




o> 

CI 

3 

1-3 


>> bfl 


bi) 

a 


40 r* 

O O 

O J5 


©' 

© 

Q 










1^ 


»ra 


>o 


co 


C5 


OI 


CO o 


!-H 


-* >o 


s 








CM 




o 


~tl 


o 


CO 


CM ^*l 


I- 


CM CM 






•jaqumfsj 


CO 


CM 




CO 

•o 


OS 


s 




CO 

oo 


-f l-H 

O CO 


CO 

o 


> 


























CM 


"^ 





1G0 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



53 

8 

o 

-to 

o 






s 



o 

CO 

6 

H 

ffl 









•* 


M< 


t>. 


-# 


rt( 


CO CO 


CO "«*l 


"* 


tH 


TJH 


m 






•ssaupj'Bjj 
























•paransuoo uqSAxq 


o 

CM 


CM 


CO 




C35 


Th CO 

i-H CM 


CO T-H 
CM CM 


CM 


CO 


CM 
CM 


T-H 

CM 


1? i 




o 


o 


© 


O 


o 


O T-H 


© © 


CO 


© 


© 


© 


H 


•S8^TJ^I^[ 


o 


o 


CO 


o 


O 


CO CO 


© © 


© 


©1 


© 


© 


o 


o 


CO 


o 


o 


CO CO 


© © 


© 


© 


© 


© 


O 




© 


o 


o 


o 


o 


© o 


© © 


© 


© 


© 


© 


O oa 






















































o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o o 


© © 


© 


© 


© 


<NI 




•saq.'Bi^T^j 


o 


T-H 


CO 


lO 


CO 


© o 


t-H © 


© 




© 




£ 


o 


o 


© 


o 


o 


© © 


© © 


© 


©1 


© 


© 




o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


© © 


© © 


© 


© 


© 


© 


•euuoiqQ 


1— 1 


K5 


CM 


co 


Oi 


T-H 00 


CO CM 


T-H 


© 


-* 


© 


"* 


-* 


Tt< 


CO 


CO 


TH CO 


CO -# 


-* 


-<*l 


CO 


CO 








-* 


CO 


CO 


<o 


00 


CM 1 


-rM -*jh 


1 


>* 


CM 


T-H 




Q 

M 

o 


■papuadsng 


o 


CM 

o 


CO 

o 


o 


CO 

o 


CM 

© 


CO CM 

© ©i 




CM 

© 


CO 

© 


CO 

© 






o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


© 


© © 




© 


© 


© 




CM 


■<* 


o 


CM 


o 


© 1 


■<*l CM 


1 


OO 


© 


00 


HH 


?! 


■pQApSSIQ 


CM 


CM 


M< 


■>* 


ca 


-* 


lO t^ 




CO 


CO 


CO 


fc 


p 




o 


o 


O 


o 


CO 


© 


© © 




© 


© 


© 


o 


n 


























§ 




CO 


o 


CO 


00 


00 


(N <M 


00 CD 


CM 


cq 


C3 


CM 




TB^ox 


CO 


1Q 


t~ 


OS 


o 


CO T-H 


OO © 


CO 


CO 


CO 


!>. 


«i 














t-H CM 


T-H T-H 


T-H 




T-H 








© 


o 


© 


o 


o 


© © 


© © 


© 


© 


© 


© 




CM 


CM 


OO 


-* 


CO 


TJ4 © 


© © 


CO 


CM 


CO 


© 




•88JJ 




T-H 


CO 


CO 




t-H CM 


C<1 M< 


T-H 


T— 1 


© 


CM 




o 


o 


o 


CO 


o 


© © 


© © 


© 


© 


© 


© 






o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


© © 


© © 


© 


© 


© 


© 


DUE 
APO- 

ON. 


•uox^raSj 


o 


o 


o 
o 


o 

CM 


o 

CM 


© © 

o> CO 


O no 

CM CO 


© 

CM 


© 

© 


© 


CO 

T-H 


uo ss<yj 
























M ►> H 

COM H 




























o 


us 


lO 


lO 


o 


«5 © 


© © 


«5 


© 


>o 


CM 


tf £K 


'ItJOJ, 


o 


© 


OO 


■* 


o 


t^ CO 


OS CM 


OO 


I>- 


r^ 


© 


O 




<* 


CO 


CO 


CO 


"<*< 


CO -* 


CO •"* 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 
















TJ 


o> 


























d 




























03 . 


XI 
















o 


-4-i 




a> 


01 


^ 


eta 
.able 
















Xi 


d 




rO 


x> 


-%$ 6 
















03 


o3 




c3 


03 
















-ij 


o> 
bO 


oq 
03 


Xi 

03 
+3 


to 


-p 
0> 
bJO 


inctly veget 
ntly unplea 
tly vegetab 


bfl _j Oi 


Xi 
o3 


Xi 
o3 


Xi 
03 








o 


> 
+3 


a 
d 


0> 
bO 
01 

> 

>> 


> 
d 


> 
d 


inctly v 
d sweeti 
inctly v 


01 
bfl 

CO 

> 
>> 


0> 
bfl 
0> 
> 

>> 


o> 

bfl 

o> 

> 
>> 












+3 


+3 






-t-> 


+3 


+3 










<4-H 


d 


d 


U-i 


«*H 


^■g.B 


.52 o3.2 


d 


d 


d 












a 


c3 






•r^s 


03 


03 


o3 






« 
O 
Q 
O 




> 


Pn 


fe 


> 


> 


PR 


Q Q 


fe 


f=) 


FH 




















73 

d 
























03 






















o 




ej 




o> 


o> 


0> 








































d 


© 


Xi 




6 & 




Xi 


Xi 


Xi 












c3 


c3 




Xi o3 




eti 


crt 


m 












OQ 


X! 


-p 




t^> -fc? 


03 ^2 


-*j 


+3 


-*3 








73 




03 
0> 


o3 


o 
bfl 




n $ 


In - 


bfl 


0> 

bfl 


o> 

bO 








o 

o 








o> 




<D P 


bfl a) 


0i 


0> 


0> 










a 

£3 


bfl 


> 




bfl > 
0> 


g . bfl 


> 


> 


> 












"1 


> 


>> 




> >> 


>> 


>> 


>. 








































>> 


>> 


d 




>f d 


^^>> 


+3 

d 


d 


d 












+3 








■+* *d 


+J 8+) 
















a 

O 


d 
'3 


d 

'3 


n-l 


d 
o 


.2 «S 

03 


2 i* s 

"c3 m "c3 


«<H 


o3 

<4-l 


t*H 










14 


N 


h 


> 


14 


Ph > 


fe h 


> 


> 


^ 








O 


•pjeptre^g 


CM 

o 


o 


T-H 


1— 1 


o 


ITS © 
© t-H 


CO 00 

© © 


CO 

© 


US 

© 


© 


© 


» 


o 
o 


uinuT^u 


























-p 


•+3 


-P 


■+ A-, 


. -t-5 


+= -P 


-p +3 


+a 


4^ 


+3 






B 




pC| 


rd 


-d 


XI V 


03^3 


,d xi 


rd ,d 


Xi 


Xi 


Xi 








bfl 


bll 


bl) 


OQ 


H bJD 


bfl bfl 


bfl bfl 


bfl 


bll 


bfl 






«1 


•^uetmpeg 


OQ 


00 


OQ 


>J OQ 


OQ OQ 


OQ OQ 


OQ 


OQ 


OQ 






H 

CM 
Ph 

<1 




> 


> 


> 


►> m 


w> 


> > 


> > 


> 


> 


> 










+3 


-P 


+3 


+3 


-P -P 


H-S +3 


+3 


+3 














,4 


rd 


rd 


xi 


xi xi 


nd xi 


^ 


Td 














bfl 


bfl 


M 


bfl 


bfl bfl 


bfl bfl 


bfl 


bfl 










•^ipiqmx 


0> 


OQ 


0Q 


OQ 


OQ 


OQ OQ 


OQ GQ 


OQ 


OQ 


d 










5 


> 


> 


> 


> 


> > 


> > 


> 


> 


^ 










<M 


© 


<M 


CO 


■* 


T-H CO 


O T-H 


iO 


CO 


00 










i— 1 












T-H CO 












"UOl 


^ 08 n°o j° n^a 


d 

03 

1-5 




3 


a 

<3 


c3 


June 
July 


bfl bfl 

d d 
< < 


4-> 

o 


> 

o 


6 
o> 

Q 










CO 


i— i 


CM 


o 


1« 


Tft © 


■* tH 


OO 


rH 


© 








T* 


>o 


lO 


CO 


o 


<M <M 


t-H CO 


OS 


O 


i>- 








•jeqran^j 


OO 
CO 


CO 




C5 


C5 
HO 


■* CM 
CO I>. 


T-H CO 
0O 00 


CO 

© 


CM 

© 
CM 


© 
© 

CM 


> 
< 





No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



161 



-to 
"+o 

•<s> 

© 















co 

6 

fa 

n 
< 









CO CO l>- 


CO CM 


CM 


CM 


CO 


1— 1 


CM 


CM 


t- 


■* 




•ssaupj'Bjj 


CM CM CM 


CM CM 


CM 


CM 


CM 


CM 


CNI 


CM 


CM 


CNI 


•paxnnsuoo uaSAxQ 


t~» T-l CD 


IO CO 

T*l T* 


C5 
CO 


OS 
CO 


IO 
CO 


05 
CM 


IO 
CO 


CM 

CO 


■* 


© 


& 




O O O 


1— 1 1— 1 


O 


o 


CO 


t^ 


© 


© 


© 


,_, 


H 


•S8^TJ^T^[ 


o o o 


o o 


o 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


o 


o o o 


o o 


o 


o 


© 


O 


© 


© 


© 


© 


O 




o o o 


o o 


o 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


O T. 

K < 


















































o © © 


o o 


o 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


CO 




•Saq.'BJ^TJSj 


CO © Tf* 


O © 


CM 


o 


© 


i— 1 


© 


CNI 


CM 


■<* 


£ 


O © iH 


1-H O 


o 


o 


© 


© 


© 


1© 


© 


© 




O © O 


o o 


o 


o 


© 


© 


o 


© 


© 


© 


■8UTJOJTJQ 


IO i— 1 CD 


tH © 


00 


IO 


»o 


© 


<M 


00 


© 


IS- 


(•» . t» t> 


t^. CO 


CO 


CO 


CD 


IO 


CD 


© 


CD 


CD 








co CM r(H 


CM CO 


TJH 


CM 


CD 


"# 


© 


CM 


00 


© 




Q 

t-t 
O 


•papuadsng 


© 1^ CO 
CD O O 


i—l CM 

O i-H 


00 

o 


o 


© 


o 


© 


00 

© 


o 


CO 
© 






o o o 


o o 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 




CO o o 


o o 


>* 


CO 


-* 


© 


CM 


TH 


00 


T— 1 


< 


P 


•p8AJOSSTQ 


t~ O CD 

1— ! (M l— < 


CO i-H 

CM CNI 


CO 


CM 


© 


CO 


CM 


CD 


© 


Cft 


s 


p 




© o o 


o o 


o 


o 


© 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


o 


n 
























§ 




CM CM Tt< 


CM CO 


OO 


OO 


© 


TH 


OO 


CD 


CO 


© 


s 


-< 


"T'tnox 


t~ i>. cm 


-* CO 


Tj< 




»o 


l>- 


>o 


TfH 


t-~ 


CO 


«< 




IM N IN 


CM CO 


(M 


CO 


CM 




!M 


CM 


CM 


CM 






O O O 


o o 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 




O CO ■<* 


00 CO 


CO 


CO 


CNI 


© 


CM 


© 


CD 


-* 




•88Jj[ 




CM i-l 




© 








<Cs| 


CO 


•* 




O © O 


© O 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


CM 


© 






o o o 


o o 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


H O . 


•uopraSj 


o o o 


© o 


UO 


IO 


IO 


IO 


© 


O 


»o 


T*H 


CM O ■* 


00 o 


CM 


CO 


© 


l>- 


!>. 


IO 


OO 


t^ 


G > 2 


uo sson[ 


CM CM 1— I 


~ ^ 


CM 


T— 1 


CM 


i—t 


^ 


1—1 


i-H 


-■ 


a&% 




o o o 


o o 


o 


© 


>o 


© 


© 


o 


IO 


© 


P3 g « 

o 


•re:}0£ 


00 t— US 


CO OO 


CO 


-* 


i— 1 


00 


CM 


*-l 


© 


CNI 


CO CD CO 


CO IO 


CO 


CD 


CO 


IO 


CD 


>o 


CO 


CO 






13 T3 


TS 


Tl 












13 










a a 


c 


(1 












C 










o3 • o3 
















o3 










vegetable 
npleasant 
vegetable 
npleasant 
vegetable 






© 


©' 


© 


© 




© 

42 
03 

© 
bfl 
© 
> 










© 
— © 

-4-3 CO 


© 
03 


43 
o3 

+3 

© 
bfl 


42 
03 

© 
bfi 


42 
03 

© 
bfl 


42 
03 

+3 
© 

bfi 


>l 








o 

w 




bfi 
© 


© 

> 


© 
> 


© 

> 


© 
> 


43 

+3 








>> ? >> 3 >> 


>> o3 © 


> 


>> 


>i 


>> 


>> 


03 


>5 . 










_U K*i-u3 ^J-P 




>^> 


+3 


-fj 


+3 














stinc 
aintl 
stinc 
aintl 
stinc 


aintly 
unple 
lintly 


a 


s © 

i-i ■ rt 


o 

.s 

fa 

33 


© 

fa 

03 


© 

.s 

fa 

03 


-1-3 

a 
























03 








o 

Q 

C 




Q Q Q 


fa fa 


fa 


fa 


fa 


fa 


fa 


fa 


Q 










T5 


T-S 












13 










G 


fl 












S3 












03 


03 












o3 












© 


© 












© 










© © © 


3 r2 


42 


© 


© 


© 


© 


>i 


42 










42 42 X! 


o3 42 


03 


42 


X2 


42 


42 


43 


03 








13 


03 o3 03 


■s .J 


© 


03 


03 


03 


03 
-p> 


-u 


© 










© © © 


&P"S © 




© 


© 


© 


© 


03 










Q 


bfl bfl bfl 


© C bC 




bfl 


bfl 


bO 


bll 


© 










© 0) © 


> 03 © 


> 


© 


© 


© 


© 




> 










l> > > 


tly 
pleas 
tly v 


S-^S 


> 


> 
>> 


> 


fa 


>i43 










+3 +3 -1-3 










•+^ 




+3 +3 










fl a a 


a g a 


A 


<s.y 


13 


(3 


a 




.S » 












"ol ^'Ee 




















o3 o3 o3 


03 


® o3 


03 


Gl 


03 




03 ® 










fa fa fa 


fa fa 


fa 


fa 


fa 


fa 


fa 


> 


fa 








o 


•pj'BpU'B^g 


t^ t^ CO 
CM CNI CO 


CO CM 


CM 


CM 
CM 


CO 
CM 


© 


rt 


-i 


(© 


CO 


H 


o 

o 


ranui^ejj 








































• 






o 




. 43 






13' 










xi 






15 




+3 M +3 


+^ S'pC-4 


£3 bfi 


•+J 


+J 




bfi 






« 


•^uaunpag 


43 a 43 
fell to bfl 


r] 03 


c3^3 
H hf) 


a 


c3 43 

l-c 11 


43 
bfl 


43 
bfl 


43 
bfl 


03 






<< 




^H ' '^ 


j3 o 




o 
















CL, 

Cm 




CO > CO 


CQ O 


Oi 


u 


t> 


CO 


CO 


CO 


> 








+3 fa +3 






+3 


+^ 


+3 


+3 


-f3 


+3 










43 J ^3 






,_^ 


4^ 


43 


4^ 


^ 


43 










bfi bfl bfi 






bfl 


bfl 


bfl 


bfl 


bfi 


bfl 








•A^ipiqjnx 


03 03 03 


43 43 
bfl bfl 


43 
bfi 


m 


In 


09 


03 


m 


M 










>•>">■ 


W W 


CO 


> 


> 


> 


> 


t> 


> 








IO CM CO 


CO ^ 


(>l 


t>» 


CO 


- 


IO 


CO 


- 






UOT^OOnOQ JO O^Q 


Jan. 
Feb. 
Mar. 




U 
P 

1-3 




bfi 

13 
< 


a 
© 

CQ 


u 

O 


>■ 
O 

!5 


© 

Q 










IO CO 


-* 


CO 


>o 


»o 


00 


O0 


© 








■"f o 


l~- 


t^ 


>o 




CM 


CO 


i- 








•joquinjsj 


1- <M 1- 

co -* -t< 


CO c^ 
>o >o 


co 


<M 


© 


oo 




© 

C-l 


00 

© 

CM 


1 


i 



162 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



© 

"CO 

O 

oq 

CO 

3 

o 

feci 

£3 



Si, 

fcVi 






?3 
r~<3 






CO 

6 

H 

m 
< 









CO 


CO 


CO 


■<HH 


CO 


CO 


co 


CO 


rH 


Tt< 


i-H 


H* 1 


H* 




•ssaupj'BH 




























•paumsuoo uqSAxq 


CM 


OS 
CM 


CM 


O 
CO 


CO 
CM 


■* 


CO 
CM 


CM 


CM 


hHH 
CM 


© 

CO 


CM 


CM 


% 




o 


O 


o 


CM 


o 


r _ i 


1—1 


© 


O 


© 


© 


CO 


o 


•S8!JIJ^TJsJ 


© 


o 


o 


o 


CO 


o 


o 


© 


CO 


O 


CO 


CO 


© 


H 


o 


CD 


o 


o 


CO 


o 


© 


o 


© 


o 


<o 


o 


© 


e 




o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


CO 


© 


© 


© 


CO 


o 


© 


© 


O co 

P3 ■*! 


























































E-i 




o 


CD 


o 


o 


o 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


o 


o 


CO 


•sa^i^TjNj 


US 


OO 


CM 


C5 


co 


H* 


CM 


H* 


"* 




co 


oo 


t-^ 


£ 


© 


O 










o 


© 


CO 


o 


o 


o 


© 




o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


•eutJop^Q 


C5 


00 


CM 


OS 


r^ 


US 


CO 


© 


•o 


CO 


t^ 


© 


C5 


CO 


CO 


tH 


CO 


CO 


T)H 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


OO 


CO 








© 


OO 


00 


o 


CM 


CO 


© 


© 


© 


■* 


CM 


OO 


CM 






•popuedsng 


CM 

o 


y— 1 

o 


CM 

O 


^+1 

o 


CO 


CO 
CO 


o 


o 


CM 

© 


© 


CO 


CO 

o 


CM 

© 




p 

H 

o 




o 


o 


© 


o 


o 


o 


© 


© 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 




o 


o 


*# 


OO 


o 


OO 


OO 


00 


OO 


00 


© 


CM 


CO 


«< 


f-i 


•paApssiQ 


JZj 


CO 


© 

CO 


C33 
CO 


CO 












CM 


CM 




iZi 


p 




o 


o 


o 


CO 


CO 


o 


o 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 




pq 






























S 




o 


00 


CM 


CO 


CM 


•* 


O0 


00 


OO 


CM 


CM 


© 


CO 


§ 


■< 


•p^oj, 


CO 


-<* 


CM 


CO 


t^ 


CM 


us 


<M 


CO 


CO 


CO 


OO 


OO 


<1 


































o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


© 


© 


CO 


© 


© 


© 




CM 


■<* 


CM 


CM 


OO 


CO 


00 


00 


CM 


© 


© 


OO 


TP 




•88 J J 










o 


-1— 1 


© 


© 














O 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


© 


© 


o 


CO 


© 


o 


© 






o 


o 


© 


o 


o 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


o 


H O . 


•uot|iu§i 


CO 


us 
us 


us 


o 

CM 


US 
OO 


us 

CM 


© 


CO 


us 

© 


us 


© 
© 


© 
o 


C3 


1= S & 
Q O O 


uo sso^ 


























































ET C£1 H 




O 


© 


o 


o 


o 


us 


© 


© 


lO 


US 


US 


us 


05 


<& * « 


TBV>X 


""1 


C5 


CM 


*~! 


OS 


00 


b- 


CO 


co 


US 


H* 


H* 


, " H . 


o 




** 


"* 


-* 


■* 


CO 


-# 


"<*J 


^ 


CO 


CO 


CO 


OO 


•* 
















CJ 


6 


6 


CO 




6 




















































rO 


rO 


rO 


rO 




rQ 

eg 












o 


CJ 


0> 


o 


o 


c3 


c3 


cj 


c3 


a> 


cj 










rO 


rQ 


rO 


£> 


^2 










rO 


-p 


rQ 










o3 


«! 


c3 


CJ 


a 


bfl 


bfl 


bfl 


bfl 


IS 


bfl 


c3 










-p 


-p 


+5 


+i 














-p 








O 

w 


o 


bO 


CJ 
bfl 


<3i 
bfl 


0> 

bfl 


> 


> 


> 


> 


CJ 

bfl 


r* 


0) 

bfl 








> 


> 


> 


a; 

> 


> 


>> 


>1 


>> 


>> 


> 


>> 


CD 
> 
























-p 


















>> 


>> 


>, 


>> 


>> 


o 


o 


o 


O 


>x 


d 


>, 










































+3 


-P 


+s 


+s 










-p 




-P 










d 


d 


d 


d 


d 


-p 




-p 


-p 


d 




d 






































O 
Q 
O 




fa 


c3 
fa 


fa 


c3 


C3 


Q 


Q 


p 


P 




> 










































0) 


cj 


cj 


0> 


© 










6 


6 


6 










































rQ 


-Q 


rQ 


^2 


^2 










rQ 


rQ 


rQ 










c3 


IS) 


c8 


cl 


c3 










rt 


c3 


St 










-p 


-p 


-P 


-^ 


HP 


jn 


x> 


^ 


^2 


-p 


-p 


-p 








T3 


CJ 
M 


CJ 

bfl 


0) 
bfl 


bfl 


CJ 
bfl 


a 


c3 


c3 


c3 


© 

bfl 




bfl 


(V 
bfl 










CJ 


CJ 


0) 


<D 


O 






o 




<D 


o 


CJ 








o 


r» 


> 


> 


> 


> 


bfl 


bf) 


bfl 


bfl 


> 


> 


r* 








































>> 


>> 


>> 


t^ 


>3 


> 


> 


j> 


|> 


>» 


>, 


>> 










































-p 




-P 

d 


d 


-p 

d 


d 


>) 


>> 


>> 


>3 


d 


-p 

d 


-P 

d 










c3 


d 


c3 


c3 


c3 


d 


■p 


-P 


d 


tf 


03 


cS 










**H 


*+H 


«+H 


=+H 




.d 


• rH 




<4-i 


tt-H 




















c3 


c3 


c3 


03 
















1> 


> 


^ 


^ 


> 


r^ 


fe 


ps< 


fe 


> 


f> 


r> 








O 


•pxeptreig 


r-H 


OO 


I« 


CO 


!>. 


o 


© 


CM 


© 


CM 


© 


© 


H* 


H 


o 
o 


ranui^Bu 






























-P 


+3 




4-3 


+3 




-p 


-P 


-p 


-P 


-P 


-P 






» 




rd 


rd 




rj 


pd 




rd 


rd 


rd 


rd 


rd 


rd 








bfl 


bfl 




bfl 


bfl 




bfl 


bfl 


bfl 


bfl 


bfl 


bll 






< 


■^uaunpag 


1» 


XIX 


d 


"m 


'm 


rd 

bfl 


m 


"S 


CQ 


"7. 


to 


1o 






«< 
































-Ph 
Ph 




> 


> 


^ 


> 


> 


w. 


> 


f> 


f> 


> 


> 


r> 








-p 


-P 


+j 


-P 


-P 




-p 


-p 


-P 


-p 


-p 


-P 










j^ 


rd 


rd 


rd 


rd 




rd 


rd 


rd 




rd 


rQ 










bfl 


bfl 


bfl 


bfl 


bfl 




bfl 


bfl 


bfl 


bfl 


bfl 


bfl 








•A^ipiqjnx 












rd 
































M 






















> 


i> 


>> 


> 


> 


CB 


> 


> 


> 


> 


> 


r> 








lO 


CM 


CM 


o 


H* 


~ 


CO 


CO 


- 


O 


CM 


CM 






•UOI^OBIPQ JO 9^BQ 


c3 


rQ 
CJ 

fa 


03 




>3 


o 
d 

d 

r-5 


r^ 


bfl 

d 


-p 

a 
w 


-P 

o 

O 


o 


6 









CD 


7— i 


H* 


CO 


CO 


OS 


us 


lO 


CO 


LO 


OO 


OS 








o 


CO 


CM 


03 


CO 




CM 


CO 


CO 




H* 




•leqran^; 


CO 


CM 




CO 

us 


00 

in 


H* 

CO 


CM 


C3 


co 

O0 


CO 

C2 


© 


00 
CO 


> 




























CM 


CM 







No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



163 






© 
P. 
© 



S ©» 



CO 

© 



S3 



ss 

S3 



© 

s- 



CO 
CO 

d 
w 



•ssaupjejj 



•paumsuoo uqSAxq 



H 
C 
O 05 



o 


O 

H 


P 




H 


o 
ft 


H 


<! 


ti 





« 
O 

O 

O 



OOOOONlOHHrtHHHHHHHHHHNNHHHrtHH 



•sa^u^i^ 



•Sa^BIITjsJ 



OOOOOaNrtOHOrtrtH t-iOtHOOi-Ii-Ii-HOOOOOt-I 

©00©©0©©0©©©©©©©©0000©©©©©0© 
©©©©©©©©©©©©©©©©©OOOOOO©©©©© 

©ooooooooooooooooooooooooooo 



COO-*THNnHr- II^COOO-<#Ttli-HCOe<lC»CO-*J<©COcOCOt^ev|OOOCO 
••#COCO'-HCOt^I^eO-*CO-tfl^tHCOCO-<*-'#i— lNm'*'*'!j(tD^IHONM 

ooooo-^c^ooooooooooooooooooooo 
O O O O O i-i CM © oooooooooooooooooooo 



•euTioiqQ 



papuadsng 



•paApsstQ 



"F;ox 



•aaj^ 



<M r-l CO CO Tj4 ■"*! 
CO CO Oq tNl CQ t^ 

ooooo o 
oooooo 



t>^OCO-*CSICOt^-*COCMCOi— I CCI © r-l CXI r-H i— I i— ICMOO 

oqcoc>qi^c^oc^c>5^cooiTt<TticDcoc<ic<ico(r<ic<i'— i 

oooooooooooooooooooo© 

I oooooooooooooo ooo oooo 



i— I rt r-H ~H H CO 

oooooo 



iNMNNTJICOOONmoeSmTtHffiCSlNNCCIINrtO 

HiHHHHWrtTHNIMi-ieqiNiHHHHH.rHHH 

I OOO'OOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO 



•<JHIMCDOOtOmOfflOMOlOl(500N(NIM^CBlOOOOfflN(MlOOOT)( 

i>-»o-*coc<icoe35-<*«OTH^«ocooej5coeoc<ioocoocNi^-<*b-.-«i<cocNi 

^^^^^COOOOOOOCOCMOCNeqCXlCXlCMlCNlCOT-l,— It— IrtrtH 

OOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO© 



•UOT^TUSl 

no sso^ 



*F*°X 



TtlMCOCOCOOCOCOCOCOCOCOOT^-^lO-^rtltOlOOCOCOCOCOCO^CO 



•pj'BpU'B^g 



t^rHCOC<ICOlO->*OOTj(COTfllOCiO©Tf<©T-llf , 5cXlCOOCOlOt^t^'^tlCS) 

MKHMHrHlOOi-IHHrtrHMJniOOOtOONNINlOr-lrtOOrtrH 

T— I 

p** > k*i ?*! p*> r*a • •••••••••••••••••••••• 

■4-i -+J +i +5 -U> 

a a a a a 

y Z^ ~^ y ~^ _^_^ ^? ^} Q ^> ^ > ^ > ^5 ^s Q ^i ^> ^i ^i ^ p] > ^ ^ ^i ^a ^ a P}1 

S S S a S22222222222222222222222 

SSSSm°°000000000000000000000 



. .^m-q ,®g . ..S a . . . ..5 a . • •• & • • . . 

aBfl^T3^ coco co a cscs 

Oj cu Co <u g g CO >j >, M M +5 -ti ti t-> T-! t-1 M M o O c3 S Ph 03 C7 

a^g'5§oc3§b^2 S-S.9.S a all 2 SOU a S<2 a- a 

^5 . rt . rt . rt J J . rt 33 2 gooo-S'S'S S 2 rtrt « 55 §." 5* rt 
C x ^ ^ ?: ^ £ ^ oj a; Ph fe W W W -< < < Ph Ph hJ h-} ^ H rA H H H 



164 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



Table No. 34. 



Chemical Examinations of Water from a Faucet in Boston, 
from 1892 to 1914. 

[Parts per 100,000.] 







Color. 


Residue on 
Evaporation. 


Ammonia. 




Nitrogen 

AS 


CD 

s 

co 






*6 


T3 




a 




albuminoid. 








Yeak. 


m 

PI 
u o3 

Ct> -+J 
CO 

2 


03 

Si 
5 


^3 

o 
H 


a m 

OH 
co 

CO 

O 

k1 


CD 
Sh 


Is 

o 


o 

> 

co 

CO 

5 


T5 

o 

a 

CP 

a 

CO 

W 


6 

£ 
O 


CO 
+3 


co 
© 

+3 


o 
« 

el 

to 

>> 

X 

o 


co 

CO 



a 

a 


1892, 




.37 


.37 


4.70 


1.67 


.0007 


.0168 


.0138 


.0030 


.41 


.0210 


.0001 


- 


1.9 


1893, . 




.61 


.53 


4.54 


1.84 


.0010 


.0174 


.0147 


.0027 


.38 


.0143 


.0001 


.60 


1.8 


1894, . 




.69 


.58 


4.64 


1.83 


.0006 


.0169 


.0150 


.0019 


.41 


.0106 


.0001 


.63 


1.7 


1895, . 




.72 


.59 


4.90 


2.02 


.0006 


.0197 


.0175 


.0022 


.40 


.0171 


.0001 


.69 


0.7 


1896, . 




.49 


.45 


4.29 


1.67 


.0005 


.0165 


.0142 


.0023 


.37 


.0155 


.0001 


.56 


1.4 


1897, 




.65 


.55 


4.82 


1.84 


.0009 


.0193 


.0177 


.0016 


.40 


.0137 


.0001 


.64 


1.6 


1898, 




.41 


.40 


4.19 


1.60 


.0008 


.0152 


.0136 


.0016 


.29 


.0097 


.0001 


.44 


1.4 


1899, 




.23 


.28 


3.70 


1.30 


.0006 


.0136 


.0122 


.0014 


.24 


.0137 


.0001 


.35 


1.1 


1900, 




.24 


.29 


3.80 


1.20 


.0012 


.0157 


.0139 


.0018 


.25 


.0076 


.0001 


.38 


1.3 


1901, 




.24 


.29 


4.43 


1.64 


.0013 


.0158 


.0142 


.0016 


.30 


.0173 


.0001 


.42 


1.7 


1902, 




.26 


.30 


3.93 


1.56 


.0016 


.0139 


.0119 


.0020 


.29 


.0092 


.0000 


.40 


1.3 


1903, 




.25 


.29 


3.98 


1.50 


.0013 


.0125 


.0110 


.0015 


.30 


.0142 


.0001 


.39 


1.5 


1904, 




- 


.23 


3.93 


1.59 


.0023 


.0139 


.0121 


.0018 


.34 


.0110 


.0001 


.37 


1.5 


1905, 




> - 


.24 


3.86 


1.59 


.0020 


.0145 


.0124 


.0021 


.35 


.0083 


.0001 


.35 


1.4 


1906, 




- 


.24 


3.86 


1.39 


.0018 


.0159 


.0134 


.0025 


.34 


.0054 


.0001 


.36 


1.3 


1907, 




- 


.22 


3.83 


1.40 


.0013 


.0129 


.0109 


.0020 


.33 


.0068 


.0001 


.32 


1.3 


1908, 




- 


.19 


3.50 


1.35 


.0011 


.0115 


.0092 


.0024 


.33 


.0092 


.0001 


.26' 


1.2 


1909, 




- 


.18 


3.46 


1.43 


.0011 


.0128 


.0103 


.0025 


.28 


.0034 


.0000 


.25 


1.3 


1910, 




- 


.14 


3.05 


1.24 


.0013 


.0118 


.0102 


.0016 


.28 


.0030 


.0000 


.22 


1.1 


1911, 




- 


.25 


4.18 


1.66 


.0015 


.0156 


.0128 


.0029 


.38 


.0029 


.0000 


.33 


1.4 


1912, 




- 


.17 


3.86 


1.23 


.0018 


.0154 


.0119 


.0034 


.36 


.0062 


.0000 


.29 


1.7 


1913, 




- 


.13 


3.96 


1.15 


.0014 


.0150 


.0120 


.0026 


.35 


.0064 


.0000 


.26 


1.5 


1914, 




- 


.14 


4.12 


1.19 


.0014 


.0138 


.0116 


.0022 


.39 


.0076 


.0000 


.25 


1.4 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



165 






00 
00 



co 

s- -- 
O to 



£ 


>i 


c^ 








•^ 


o 
o 


© 


pS 




£} 


S- 


u 


-*o 


u 


<4i 




* 


2 




o 


«4i 


eu 


^ 


% 


-*o 




<+--, 


S 


o 


o 






CO 










hf) 


Oh 






<1> 


CO 


> 


s 


c3 


o 


■ », 


•c-a 








co 


s 


g 


T} 


CO 


■~ 




& 


£ 


Hi 


C 




Gs 


+- 




rt) 


o 




<o 








»« 




© 




o 




CO 




O 




J- 




«J 




•^i 




^a 




^ 





to 

CO 

6 

w 
pq 



3S 

3 ° 
w > 






































o 
o 
03 


o 


CO 


t^ 


IO 


00 


t^ 


iO 


l>. 


C5 


^H 


00 


>o 


■* 


!>. 


o 


■* 


C5 


03 


(35 


CO 


o 


C5 


CM 


c^ 


■* 


t^ 


CO 


o 


■* 


>o 


o 


o 


OS 


00 


H « 


CO 


CO 


■* 


t>. 




CO 


CO 




CM 


OS 


t^ 


■* 




CO 


CO 


-* 




& B 


s- 


















,_, 


















M CO 


f3 




































CO 






































£ « 






































° s 






































H o 


o 
c3 


"* 


in 


o 


o 


oo 


— 


CO 


o 


»o 


CD 


CD 


■* 


t^- 


t^ 


CD 


00 


to 


52 > 


■* 




CO 


»o 


00 


CO 


o 


T^ 


I>. 


CO 




C5 


OO 


»o 




C5 


CM 


H K 


OS 


l>- 


o> 


•* 


iO 


CM 




CM 


•<* 


CO 


IO 


CM 


CO 


rt< 


IO 


CM 


CO 


M 3 


tH 




































Ph 05 


3 




































O H 


co 




































Mp^ 






































~ « 






































H 






































£ o 


c3 


CO 


t^ 


o 


T+l 


o 


CO 


CO 


OS 


r-4 


00 


05 


CO 


co 


CM 


IO 


■* 


l>- 


-*! > 


^D 


lO 


C5 


Ttl 


IO 




IO 


00 


CO 


t>. 


C5 


o 


CM 


C2 


CO 




CM 


3 M 


CN| 


CO 


CO 


oq 


iO 


CO 




CM 


■># 


CO 


CO 


CO 


-* 


to 


CO 


Tt< 


CO 


W H 


3 




































CO cc 




































<j g 


co 




































P^ 








































§ ~ 








































« 




rG 




































5 « 

^ CO 


cm 


+3 


»n 


CO 


w 


(35 


-# 


C5 


-* 


00 


CD 


»o 


IO 


o 


co 


oo 


_ 


CO 


1 




■* 




CO 


■* 


o 


CD 


t^ 


«5 


CM 


o 


CM 




CO 


t~ 


■* 


IO 




6 


(M 


<M 


CO 




CM 


1-1 


rt 


^ 


CM 


CM 


t>. 


CD 


■* 


CO 


CM 


CM 




£ 


TJ 








































§ 






































§ ^ 








































*< « 








































^ 


CO 


0> 
3 


o 


o 


lO 


CO 


r^. 


C5 


IO 


iO 


CM 


CO 


CM 


CM 


i« 


o 


00 


o 


CM 


05 


** 


■* 


CO 


(M 


IO 


l>- 


CO 


C5 




CO 


r^ 


IO 


*tl 


00 


co 


CO 


5§ 


6 


CO 


■* 


CO 


CO 


CO 


th 


■* 


iO 


CO 


T+l 


OS 


CO 

cm" 


Ttl 


T— 1 


00 


iO 


iO 


3 w 




CO 




































£* 












































S 


eo 


->* 


^ 


(M 


o 


IO 


CM 


CO 


CO 


o 




00 


eo 


CO 


CO 


CM 


OS 


EH 


o 


C35 


■* 


t^ 


o 


CO 


OS 


X* 


o 


rH 


o 


■* 


05 


CO 




t^ 


CM 


00 


-p 


CO 


CO 


o 


t^ 


t^ 


t- 


o 


IO 




CM 


CM 


'"I 


O 


CM 


oo 


CO 


»—l 


Hi « 


o 




























CM 


t^ 


»• 


Tt< 


pq 










































































o 


tes 


00 


CN 


1— 1 


^H 


CO 


IO 


t^ 


CO 


OS 


CM 


00 


CM 


CM 


-# 


o 


O 

O 


c3 


CO 


o 


lO 


C2 


b- 


CO 


CO 


»o 


o 


CM 


»o 


■* 


CM 


■* 


00 


CO 


CO 




00 


Oi 


t^ 


o 


o 


C5 


CO 


CM 


•<* 




»o 




O 


C5 


CO 


Oi 


o 






































3 






*—* 




1—1 






1-H 


1-4 


»-H 


1-H 


1-H 




1-H 


•* 


■*! 


CM 




CQ 






































S 


o 


(M 




lO 


CM 


OO 


CO 


CM 


•& 


C3 


m 


CO 


CO 


00 


CM 


1—t 


CM 




o 


-# 


lO 


CO 


CNI 


o 


00 


t^ 


o 




1—1 


00 




IO 


CO 


OO 


•>*l 


OS 


!m 5 


+3 




CM 


CO 


CM 


tH 


CO 


CO 


IO 


t~- 


■* 


00 


»o 


IO 


o 


00 


IO 


CO 






































« o 


o 
























CM 












E> > 


W 




































n « 










































































O H 






































P $ 




"* 


o 


oo 


1^ 


o 


OS 


!>. 


-<*l 


CO 


CO 


o 


-* 


rt< 


o 


C5 


CO 


IO 


M rt 




to 


t^ 


C5 


CO 


C3 


»* 




■* 


m 




IO 


J^ 


CO 


Oi 


CO 


IO 


CO 


u 

3 


CO 


•* 


■* 


CO 


«o 


us 


»o 


o 


C5 


IO 


00 


■*! 


■* 


C3 


OS 


»o 


!>• 
























CM 














CO 








































r ; 








































1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


CM 


CM 


CM 


CD 


t^ 


oo 


oo 


oo 


o 


o 


1~' 


o 
















C2 


t^ 




CO 


CO 


CM 


CO 


CO 


t~ 


o 


43 
















IO 


CM 


CM 


Tf 


C5 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CM 


CO 


m c 


O 
























T-H 












g > 

3 a 


pq 






































1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


CO 


C5 


O 


iO 




^ 


o 


C5 


IO 


C5 


CO 


►J" H 


ci 


















Tt< 


CM 


CO 


>o 


00 


s 


00 


■^1 


















CO 


t^ 


Ttl 


Tt< 


l>. 


^ 


T* 


IO 


•*! 


t^ 




3 
























CM 














CO 




































« 






































<: 






































H 






































K* 










































00 


C5 


o 


1-* 


CM 


CO 


M< 


IO 


CO 


!>. 


O0 


o 


o 




CM 




'f 






o 


o 


o 


o 


CO 


o 


o 


o 


o 


O 


o 


o 


















oo 


CO 


OS 


cro 


OS 


C3 


Oi 


C5 


C5 


C5 


C5 


C75 


o 


o 


C5 


C5 


C73 



166 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 






~ X> 



sJ 


cS 


<o 








-i, 


-p 


o 





6 


a 


£ 


t! 








rrt 


w 


Ti 


h-i 


3 


PQ 


CS 


<1 


r/5 


H 







CI 










































U 


1 - 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


Ci 


oo 


(M 


CM 


i-H 


r~ 


-# 


Y— I 


CM 


CD 


CM 


















00 


CO 


CM 


CM 


CO 


t-» 


t^ 


CO 


CD 


to 




















1— i 


CO 


"* 


Tj< 


-SH 


CO 


CO 


"* 


Tt< 


CO 


"* 












































55 M 








































fl 








































+3 o > 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


■* 


CO 


CO 


to 


CO 


CO 


1— 1 


Ci 


CM 


r- 


Ci 


















t~ 


CO 


CM 


CO 


-* 




CM 


•>* 


i-H 


CO 


*# 


















CM 


CO 


CO 


CM 


■* 


CO 


CM 


CO 


-# 


(M 


CM 






o n> 
























^ 
















55 ro 






































32 

Pi- 














































































< 








































H 


d 








































+3.1-1 S> 


1 


i-H 


CM 


o 


i— i 


00 


o 


1-^ 


CO 


^^ 


to 


Ci 


i-H 


to 


t~- 


o 


Ci 








o 


tO 


oo 


tO 


Ci 


t^ 


t^ 


00 


CM 


Ci 


to 


CM 


CO 


CD 




-* 








CM 


"Si 


CM 


•* 


CO 


Ttl 


CD 


to 


•* 


CO 


Ci 


TM 


t^ 


Ci 


TH 


to 






so ^ 
























'-' 






















































a 








































•5 o > 


o 


CM 


00 


CO 


t~- 


co 


CO 


CO 


o 


CM 


CO 


CO 


t>. 


00 


to 


— H 


CO 






co 


Ci 


CD 


TH 


co 


oo 


o 


CM 


to 




CO 




■>* 


t^ 


CO 


CO 


CO 






CM 


1— 1 


-HH 


CM 


CO 


CM 


CO 


»o 


to 


CO 


CO 


Oi 


"* 


!>• 


O 


to 


CO 




































1—4 










" r H 












. 






























£ CO 
H O 










































cm' 


■<* 


Oi 


I>. 


CO 


to 


to 


CM 


■<*1 


--H 


Ci 


Ci 


Ci 


to 


Tj< 


Ci 


o 


CD 






O 


<M 


Ci 




CM 


CO 


t^ 


to 


CM 




CO 


Ci 


CO 


to 


T— 1 


to 


■* 






J 1 


6 


co 


CO 


oo 


■* 


tO 


■^ 


"HH 


lO 


t>. 


"CH 


CO 


CO 


"* 


Ci 


Ci 


00 


to 




o 


fe B 








































> 


a o 








































P5 


o 








































a 


















































































u 


H ' 








































P5 


8 o 


-P 


rH 


CM 


Ci 


t^ 


f^ 


o 


00 


TH 


CM 


Ci 


CO 


<M 


1 


CM 


t^ 


CM 


1 






rH 


o 


CO 


Ci 


CO 


co 


CO 


o 


■* 


O 


t^ 


CO 




OO 


00 


CM 






tO 


Oi 


1— 1 


CO 


CS 


00 


00 


C5 


o 


Ci 


o 


CO 




CO 


00 
CO 


CD 
CM 






M 


H-f 






































er 


Z< 








































1? 


















































































H 










































co 


SI 
*2 








































H 


-P 
O 

'a 

h- 1 


rH 


Ci 


oo 


■«# 


CO 


o 


>o 


y—i 


1—1 


Ci 


CO 


Ci 


t^ 


o 


to 


to 


CM 




W 


O 


tO 


CD 


•* 


CO 


tO 


o 


to 


CO 


"*< 


CO 


Ci 


to 


O 


to 


CO 


Ci 




o 


CO 


CO 


lO 


CO 


tO 


TH 


"CH 


to 


CO 


CO 


t^ 


Ci_ 
1—1 


tH 


t^ 


00 


to 


-* 




O 




































■ 




d 
o 
o3 


tO 


Oi 


eo' 


CO 


1— < 


o 


LO 


Ci 


H 


o 


T— 1 


Oi 


CM 


OO 


CD 


!>. 


00 




oo 


CM 


r-- 


CM 


00 


to 


co 


O 


!>• 


Ci 


•«*< 


!>. 


CM 


Tt) 


i— < 


O 


"HH 




Ph 


tH 


■i-H 


tO 


CO 


tO 


CO 


"* 


CO 


CO 


to 


lr^ 


o 


CD 


«>. 


t>- 


CO 


CD 






























y— I 














e-i 


3 






































o 


m 






































02 








































-P 








































CO 


1 


| 


I 


I 


1 


1 


1 


I 


CO 


CO 


Ci 


Ci 


tO 


^H 


t^ 


to 


l>- 






















-co 


T* 


t~ 


Ci 


CM 


CO 




CD 


to 




















1^ 


rn 


Ci 


CO 


CO 


Ci 


T— ( 


to 


t^ 




1 » 

ba. CO 


a 

02 
























cm" 














tf 








































K 






































<j 






































H 






































>H 








































00 


Ci 


o 




CM 


CO 


rt< 


to 


CO 


t^ 


00 


Oi 


o 




CM 


CO 


"<* 






Ci 


Ci 


o 


©■ 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 




















00 


CO 


OS 


CO 


OS 


Ci 


C5 


Ci 


Ci 


Ci 


Ci 


Ci 


Ci 


Oi 


Ci 


Ci 


Ci 





No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



167 



Table No. 36. — Number of Bacteria per Cubic Centimeter in Water from Vari- 
ous Parts of the Metropolitan Water Works, from 1898 to 1914, inclusive. 

[Averages of weekly determinations.] 













Chestnut Hill Reservoir. 


Southern Service Taps. 


Year. 


Sudbury 
Aqueduct 
Terminal 
Chamber. 


Cochituate 
Aqueduct. 


Effluent 

Gate-house 

No. 2. 


Low Service, 

180 Boylston 

Street. 


High Service, 

1 Ashburton 

Place. 


1898, ...... 


207 


145 


Ill 


96 


- 


1899, 










224 


104 


217 


117 


123 


1900, 










248 


113 


256 


188 


181 


1901, 










225 


149 


169 


162 


168 


1902, 










203 


168 


121 


164 


246 


1903, 










76 


120 


96 


126 


243 


1904, 










347 


172 


220 


176 


355 


1905, 










495 


396 


489 


231 


442 


1906, 










231 


145 


246 


154 


261 


1907, 










147 


246 


118 


130 


176 


1908, 










162 


138 


137 


136 


148 


1909, 










198 


229 


119 


150 


195 


1910, 










216 


- 


180 


178 


213 


1911, 










205 


204 


151 


175 


197 


1912, 










429 


450 


227 


249 


259 


1913, 










123 


243 


157 


119 


140 


1914, 










288 


- 


252 


174 


220 


A\ 


r erag< 


3S, 


237 


201 


192 


160 


223 



168 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



?S5 

I i 

<5i 



CDs 



CO 

o 



o 
o 



' 1 



^ 



»S5 



° - 1 

CO 

© 
e 






CO 

5- 

© 
© 



CO 

6 

H 
►J 

ffl 
< 



P? H 

a > 



■(aoiAjag 
qsijl) tio^sog 'aoiqg 
uo^jnqqsy x ^ d^X 



•(eotAjag 
Avoq) uo^sog '^a'ai^g 
uo}s[Aog 081 W °XL 



H o 

a; k 
O S 



•(aoiAjag qSiJl) W^aa 
'UOI}/B}g 9JTj[ ^b d^j, 



•{901 A 

-jag ayot) pjojpe'j\[ 



NOOOOOON'HOOaCS 



Tt<-<tllOC5305000-*-*l'#-*-rt< 



^ W 4 

j a s 

I a? 



•asnoq-a^BQ ^ugngjg; 



t>-00Oai©Oi-Hi-4OO0iCi 



s * 

Ph o 



■q^dap-pij^ 



OOOOONOHHHOOC4N 



is 

H cC 
n H 

U 



o 'ON 

esnoq-8^£) ^ugrqgg 



•(^onpanby 

a^n^iqooQ) ^9[ui 



•(^onpanby 

Aanqpng) ^uj 



i i i i i i i i i i i i 



«! 5 

o 
U 



T 'sureaj^g ^.uenguj 



•uio^og 



•q;dap-pij\[ 



•ao'Bjjng 



2 H 



•q^dap-piK 



•q^dap-pipi 



i i i i i i i i i i i i 



»" l-H 

K O 

O « 

Q H 



•puuEqQ uedQ jo pug 



•rao^og 



■q;dap-piH 



•eoBjjng 



g O 



•jBAtg ja^BMqr^g 



•jaAig ^axodaumQ 



•aspijg ^aoj^g j9^s93jo^ 



•uio^og 



•q^dgp-piH 



•aoujjng 



00 Ci *— iiO^OOOOcOcOiOtIhco 






CD 



B CD °3 a^ S"3 3 sto o © 



Bill 

i 3 3 3 co "►S-S 



03 OS i— I ■«# 00 t^ t>. lO »o CO CO CO "<H 



OS OS O ■* !>. 00 CD ■<* ■<*! CM CN CO CO 



o 




o 




CJ 




•n 




o 




C 


C 




cl 


M 


Cv 


a 


-p 


n 


CO 


CJ 


0) 


o 


A 


X, 


■H 


+j 




■p 


o 


3 


m 


CD 


CJ 


r/i 








u 




G 


0) 


o 


.3 



3 O 



O 3 



9 3 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



1G9 



so 

03 

e 



1-H 



£ 




o> 




w 




A 




.**° 








C) 




c 




a. 




o 








03 




03 





B 


+3 




CO 


c3 
03 

"3 


o 

G 
03 


HO 




O f-H 


q 


CO 


a 


"ft -g 

C3 3 

o a 
u 


c3 

fa 

CO 

o 
o 


"HO 


So 


Ph 


!~. 


03 




Gl 




HO 

Oj 


a 

o 


03 

Q 


CO 




"ra 








C3 
"ft 




5- 




a 




en 




c3 




^ 




03 




S 




-ij 




© 




c3 




H-, 




CO 

03 




f- 




a 




03 

HO 




+i 




C3 




TJ 




U 












co 

o 




©' 








CO 




a 




03 




o 




S~. 








-* 




a 




HO 

53 




e8 

CO 




5- 




03 




0> 








B, 












c3 




03 




r* 




bs 




o 





CO 


S3 


CO 


co 

03 




t- 




G 


o 


+-> 


fc 


u 
o 




r* 


w 


G 


3 




m 


o 


«! 


-G 


H 


H 



K > 
5 H 



•(00IAJ8Q 

qSijj) uo^sog 'knqg 
uojjnqqsy j V& d^j, 



•(aoiAjag 
A\<rj) uo^sog '^aaa^s 
uo;siXoa 081 W **X 



-HrtO^iOCOPMOX^CO-H 



OOiJ^LClMOiNTtiOO^O 



Z . 

H o 

O H 



•(aotAjog qStfJ) W9J9 
-Ay; 'jeaj^g ^oooubjj 
'noi^g ejty ;i3 d^j, 



■(aotAiag 
avoi) pjojpaj^r «pjB^ 



OOtCMMNOiOOM*TH 



oooowM^iaoooiooo 







•rao^og 



•q^d8p-pij\[ 



•3013Jjng 



oeoifiiONKSOO>oioeeN 



OlCOOO>OOOcOCOOCOCCCO 



OrfO't'tO'OraiO^'^O 



H 




^ 


1" 




K 


H 




H 


M 


In 


►J 




■r 


c 


O 


Z 


- 


fa 



"Z "ON 



MOCRIOO'^COCOtO'-icCM 



S c 8*2 

., ^ W a f" a 
W h r_ 3 ►>« 

< a « j k^ 



•raonog 



•q"+dap-pi^[ 



•SD^JJUg 



ooNMinmocioooora 



ooooouiMOOiomoo 



iCONCOTllNcCOOOMin'* 



<-, << M O O ^ 

vj W H Ch 

a >Q S k 1-1 



rSS" 



•uio^^og 



•q^dap-pijif 



•eDBjjng 



KTtCr-OOOTtlCStDlOlOM 



MlOOOOSOOCCTjlOfflON 



CO"*CMCOCOOOTt<COOcNItH.lO 



W^g^' 



3 w a t> 



qauu^qQ 



uodQ jo pug 



OONCCiOCOMOOOiOOO 



, « £ C^A 

« c a B H 5 

^ b 1; ^ 2 h 

c S w 1 Cfe 



X 






■ raonoe; 



•q^dep-pipi 



•aoBjms 



OCNCNCCOOOeCiOCOiOOO 



1— ICOCCOCMCOCOCOIOCOIOOO 



ih*OMiiKMMHOOiON 









2 gQPn « 



n^ 



•uio^^og 



•q^dap-piH 



•ao^jang 



lOOOMNOOMlOWO 



0>OCT5COCOCM»OG«jlO>OrOCO 



NMOOrffflNOGiCiONm 









« F ^ c G 



170 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



Table No. 39. — Temperatures of the Air at Three Stations on the Metropolitan 

Water Works in 191 4- 

[Degrees Fahrenheit.] 





Chestnut Hill 
Reservoir. 


Fr 


AMINGHAM. 


Clinton. 


Month. 


i 

S 


a 
a 

'3 


Mean. 


a 

1 - 

"y. 


a 

a 

*a 


o 


a* 
M 


a 

a 
*a 


a 

0J 

3 


January, . 


60 


—9 


27.3 


60 


—12 


26.4 


55 


—12 


23.4 


February, 






52 


—12 


23.0 


51 


—14 


20.7 


53 


—16 


18.3 


March, 






72 


12 


35.7 


72 


10 


35.1 


64 


10 


32.9 


April, 






87 


22 


45.4 


85 


20 


44.9 


- 


22 


- 


May, 






95 


36 


60.0 


94 


33 


60.1 


86 


32 


60.8 


June, 






93 


41 


66.5 


93 


44 


66.2 


89 


45 


64.5 


July, 






89 


46 


68.5 


89 


46 


68.3 


85 


49 


67.1 


August, 






92 


46 


69.5 


92 


48 


69.7 


89 


48 


68.3 


September, 






95 


32 


63.5 


94 


29 


62.4 


92 


28 


61.2 


October, . 






80 


22 


56.4 


81 


21 


55.0 


80 


25 


53.9 


November, 






73 


15 


41.7 


71 


14 


39.9 


69 


12 


38.8 


December, 






60 


—4 


29.0 


61 


—12 


26.8 


63 


—11 


25.1 


Averages, 


- 


- 


48.9 


- 


- 


48.0 


- 


- 


- 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



© 

©, 
© 

5-. 

ho 



^2 



05 

© 

rO >~h 
Q Ob 



1-H 



<o 



o 






© 


© 




o 


•~ 


^3 


so 


K 


CO 


© 


CO 


CO 


55 



ftn 



-~ 


© 


*4> 






S- 


© 


<Jl 


fe. 


O 



< 



co 
<» 
ro 
«*■ 


•o 
C3 


rO 


^ 








53 


^5 




"^ 


oi 


© 


©i 




© 



©i 



t3 



©i 

'.O 



© 



o 
d 

a 

m 































1« CM 


CO 


■<* 


00 


00 


OS 


■<*< 


rtH 


O co 


t^ 






CO Ci 


*# 


CO 






CO 






CO 


■* 




c3 


Ci r^H 


CO 


10 






Ci 






10 10 


CO 




-*^> 
























O 


CM 




t~ 












CO 






H 


CO 
















CM 

CO 










CO 1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


00 1 


1 




** 


























CM CM 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


CM CM 


1 




«o 


CD CXI 
Oi 
















CO CM 






O t~ 


1 


CO 


_ 


1 


1 


1 


1 


00 00 


J 






CD T-H 




T-H 












t^ I— 1 






00 


CO 
















CO 






00 CO 


_ 


CO 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


CO CO 


,_, 




o 


CO i-l 
















CO i-l 






t~- 
















t^ 








co" 
















CO 






CO o 


o 


CO 


tQ 


1 


1 


1 


1 


C5 lO 









T-l O 




CO 












OS O 


T— 1 




im 


CO T-H 
















"^1 1 ~ l 






tH 


CD 
CM 
















CO 
CM 




T-l 


CD T-H 


1 


1 


1 


1 


-1 


1 


1 


O T-H 


1 




CM 
















CM 






Oi t>- 


CO 


,_, 


CM 


1 


1 


1 


1 


O C5 


CO 


w 




t-- t- 


CO 


>o 












CO !>• 


CO 


H 


CO 


t~ 
















CO 




X 


1-1 


t^r 
















i>r 




o 




CD 
















CO 




fc 
























M 
























% 




co o 


<M 


CO 


Td 


CO 


1 


I 


1 


OS ■>* 


lO 




CO lO 


-tf 


CO 












CO lO 


-* 




o 


t^ 




CM 

















to 


P* 


o 




"3 












CO 




H 




t^ 
















t^ 




fc 
























£ 


























t~- CM 


t^ 


00 


lO 


CO 


10 


1 


1 


t^ 









lO o 


CO 


00 













T*< lO 


TH 


h 


■** 













CO 






rH 




O 


<N 


"* 

















CO 




w 




!>- 




T— 1 












00 




H 


















































t— 1 t— I 


00 


CO 


1 


CM 


1 


1 


1 


t^ T-H 







CM -HH 




CO 












CO ■* 


CM 


g 


o 


CM 




■* 












CO 




<! 


SO 


ci" 





















H-t 




** 
















M< 




P 


























co "5 


t^ 


CM 


1 


1 


CM 


TH 


*tf 


CO T-H 


CO 






-H 110 


Tft 


t^ 






CM 






CD lO 


Tin 




<o 


-Ttfl 




lO 






CO 












eo 


CO 
















CO 






Oi CM 


CO 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


C5 CM 


CO 




o 


CO 
















00 






^i 


CO 
















Oi 

co 






CO T-H 


CO 


t^ 


1 


1 


1 


I 


1 


O T-H 


CO 




C-3 


CO 




<r<i 












T-H 






tH 


ci" 




CO 












00 

OS 






co eo 


-* 


10 


T— I 


1 


CM 


1 


1 


Ci rfl 


•<* 






CO "0 


CM 


<M 












Oi lO 


CM 




00 




T— 1 


C^5 






CO 









T 1 




*JI 


CM 
















CM 






























TtH CO 


tn 


1 




1 


1 


1 


1 


Tjl CO 


»o 






co 


CM 














CO 


CM 




o 


CO 
















CO 






CO 


Ci" 
CM 
















oi" 

CM 








co 








































■* 








Ci 








































Ci 
































, — i 
























co 




•+3 








^ 






CO 








0} 




O 






-u 














Q ■ 




w- 













6 








-V 




"<* 






"— 






Q 








0) 

03 




OS 






tH 
















1—1 






C5 






^3 








t-i 
CJ 




fcfl 












-i-i 








a 








M 






03 








o 




's- 






.9 






t-i 
O 








p 




*^3 






3 






O 








03 ® 




T3 


CJ 




T2 


O 




— cJ 


































O 


03 




O 


^ 




a> 




O 






CD p 

S Jo 


c3 


"o3 

>H 


03 


s 

03 


0> 



a 


03 
co 


s 

a 


03 






5 .3 


03 


(H 


a 


m 


a 


m 


'■s a 


co 






.2 


O 




.9 


.rH 


a 


co 


a 






-3 72 






m 




a 


CO 










-4J O 






O 









is g 
X 








bfi > 

C — < 


cu 


!s 


r" 


m 







CO 

a> 


00 






*— « CJ 

s8 © * 






v < 




3 


r* 


^. 03 


r" 






75 


+3 


> 


*c3 


+3 


r" 


03 




"3 






V 


M 





X 


tn 


O 


X 


Wj CJ 


r* 






nJ<a +» 

H O 


"5 




6 


H 

^ 


J 


O 


t-l 


T.T6 


.a 



■4-1 Q, 

o .S 1 

HJ ft 

CJ rt 

CD M 



Td 


bD 


a 


a 


03 







M 


0) 


^ 


rt 


^3 


a 


O 



3 O 

CO 

Cp Tj 

s i 

ft 03 

a. JJ 



<B 



o H 

w .a 



>o 


CD 


CO 


lO 





«5 


CM 


»~ ' 




co 


u 


35 


— 


^ 


3 


^ 



T-H 



,a -a o 

O U OS 

a a T-, 



172 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 






O 
ft 

© 



"X3 

ft 
© 



c~> >-~| 

i S. 

■ — -> <Oi 



oq 



© 



*©> 



CO 



d 



























o 


IC 


CM 


Ci 


o 


CM 


CM 


CM 




*3 

•is 


■* 


lO 


OS 




OS 




T* 


CO 




Th 


CM 


CO 








CO 


CM 




o 


"* 




,_r 








lO 






H 






















in 


CO 


r^ 


1 


1 


1 


CM 


CO 






<M 


"# 


■* 








t^ 


"* 




^i 


•<* 












■* 








■ OS 


!>• 


co" 


CM 


o 


1 


CM 


OS 






OS 


t^ 


CO 








lO 


l>- 




o 


CO 




CM 








CO 








so 


CO 


CO 




OS 


1 


o 


■* 




00 


lO 




CO 




oo 




»o 






CO 












CO 




to 




















H 




















H 






































fc 




















y— i 




















£ 




CO 


,_, 


CO 


,_, 


1 


1 


CO 


CM 




© 
1-1 


r^ 












t^ 




02 




















W 




















fc 








































Ph 






































o 




CO 


CM 


t^ 


CM 


00 


1 


>o 


•>* 


S 




CM 


o 


lO 




(M 




lO 


o 


CM 


00 




CO 








"* 






*H 


lO 












CO 




a 




















§ 




















•»i 








































Q 
























CO 


C5 


Ci 


CO 


CM 


CM 


CO 


o 








CM 


oo 








05 


CO 




to 


oo 




CO 








o 






*H 


CM 












CO 








CO 


I 


1 


1 




1 


CM 






o 


OS 












C5 






esj 


CM 












CM 








CM 


I 


1 


1 


1 


1 


CM 


1 




** 


HO 












lO 






CS) 


CO 












CO 












* 
















„ 












.. 




























+= 












+» 








cd 












CJ 








o 












a> 




























'-' 




-p 
















CO 




o 








■* 












CD 




-P 












OS 








CD 




OS 












■" — 




cd 




▼— 1 








» 




"* 




w- 




M 




























CO 




C5 

1— < 




■^ 




CO 








c 

CD 




.s 




C5 




6 

CD 













T3 




.s 




Q 








cd 

CO 




3 




-0 




CD 
CO 












[1 














a 


cd 


o 


0) 


o 


cd 


_£3 


CD 








= 


a 


a 

03 


a 




a 






43 

+3 


03 

CO 


"3 


03 

CO 


03 

CO 


43 
+3 


03 

CO 






a 


# f3 


3 


.2 


42 
03 


.2 


(3 


.s 






CO 


CO 


43 


CO 


43 


CO ' 


CD 


CO 








0) 


+3 


CD 


+= 


o 




CD 






03 


> 


bfl 


> 


SX) 


> 


c3 


> 






+3 




c 




S3 




+= 








o 


*oS 


o 


13 


© 


"3 


O 


r e3 






H 


> 


J 


t> 


M 


> 


H 


> 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



173 






=0 

o 

73 

e 







l-o 




cs 




*«. 




*i> 




w> 




<w 




ZQ 




«5 


^h 




*-s 




C* 


s 


>H 


•<s> 




„ 


>-s. 




00 


Cft 




S-. 


<o 


e 


*4> 


^ Q 


73 


»T 




H-y 


r-s 


5- 




o 




fe 


<a 


*. 




<» 






W 


a 


•c~> 


fe 




8 


"<S> 






•^ 


CO 


r-o 


v> 


o 


i^S 


IA 


<o 


© 








*-H 




S=H 






© 




fc, 





c^ 



© 



^ 



6 

H 







»o 


CO 


co 


OS 


CO 


r-l 


"* 


^H 


LO 


t>. 


CO 


CS 


LO 


eq 


CS 


CM 


CO 


i-l CO 




lO 






o 


LO 


00 


LO 


OS 


*-< 


00 


TH 


o 


LO 


CO 


LO 


O 


t- 


CS 


TH 


LO 


O i-H 




cs 




OS 


LO 


CO 


OS 


C-l 


os 


■* 


TH 


CM 


^H 


1-^ 


CM 


CO 


^, 


LO 


CO 


CM 


CM -H 


I 


CO 








CO 


OS 


CO 


■* 


rH 


CM 


CO 


LO 


LO 


CO 


TH 


TH 


CO 


CM 


<M 


CO 


CM CM 








§ 




00 










1—1 


























oo 


< 

Eh 














































o 


o 


o 


t^ 


o 


! 1 


CM 


LO 


OS 


CO 


t^ 


o 


CO 


CO 


CO 


LO 


CM 


00 CO 


CM 


1 


O 




00 


00 


CO 


■<* 


co 


CS 


LO 


o 


CO 


CO 


OS 


OS 


oo 


OS 


C>] 


t-^ 


CM 


O i-l 


oo 




H 


-P 


LO 


LO 


>o 


o 


00_ 


CM 


r ~l 


•~1 


00 


cq 


OS 


00 


00 


•<* 


Cfl 


o 


OS 


CM_ t-^ 


CO 






cu 


oo" 




LO" 


co" 


co" 


Cs" 


OS 


o 


T^" 


cm" 


Cs" 


th" 


co" 


i>r 


t~-" 


o" 




CO" rt" 


t>r 






CD 


CM 




OS 


t^ 


C-l 


LO 


LO 


th 


t^ 


t^ 


Cs 


C-l 


LO 


CO 


co 


LO 


t-- 




t^ 






En 


CO 


T* 

-#" 


'C* 


•* 


CM 


CM 


CO 


CO 


CM 


CM 


T—i 


CM 


CM 












LO_ 

Cs 








00 


TH 


O0 


o 


LO 


o 


■co 


CO 


(M 


LO 


CO 


^1 


OS 


rH 


CO 


CS 


o 


00 LO 


oo 


LO 








00 


•o 


O] 


o 


o 


CO 




CM 


o 


CO 


co 


tH 


cs 


LO 


CO 


CO 


O CM 


o 


CO 








OS 


OS 


o 


o 


CO 


00 


CO 


t- 


OS 


CO 


o_ 


N. 


TH 


°i 


CM 


CQ 


OS o_ 








^f 








































CO 
CO 








CO 


o 


OS 


t^ 


o 


o 


CO 


CO 


TH 


CM 


e<T 


t>T 


CO" 


t>r 




I>r 


oo" cs" 


TH 










<M 


LO 




CO 


o 


CM 


LO 


t^ 


r-H 






LO 






CJ 


LO 


o 








i— 1 










1 — 1 
























t^ 






CM 


1— 1 


^H 


<N 


CD 


CO 


OS 


LO 


LO 


cs 


y— | 


CN 


co 


r^ 


CS 


CO 


o 


O th 


tr^ 


CS 






CO 


TH 


CO 


LO 


CO 


CM 


CM 


LO 


C] 


CO 


CO 


cs 


00 


CM 


t^ 


CS 


CM 


O lO 


o 


CS 






OS 


lo 


>* 


rH 


LO 


CM 


t^ 


CO 


CO 


LO 


oo 


CO 




CO 




OS 




00 oo_ 


00 














































CO 




CO 








o 


o 


CM 


"# 


cs 


CM 




CO 




TH 


OS 


CO 


cm" 


o 


CO OS 


OS 








OS 






TJH 


«* 


CO 


CO 


Ttl 


OS 


CO 


CM 


tH 


TH 


o 


o 


o 


CO CO 


t^ 








cm_ 


OJ 


CN 






























LO 








rt ~ 


































co" 






1 


i 


1 


1 


1 


1 


T}H 


i 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 1 


TH 


cs 




c- 














OS 

OS 
























OS 

OS 


1—1 

o 




O0 


lo 


-* 


CO 


■CO 


CO 


t^ 


cs 


t^ 


CO 


CM 


CS 


O 


LO 


CO 


LO 


CO 


O CO 


t--. 


o 






l-~ 




o 


t^ 


o 


t^ 


CO 


CO 


TH 


TH 


CS 


CO 


CM 


CO 


TH 


TH 


TH 


CO OS 










00 


CO 


CO 


t^ 


-co 


CO 


rt* 


LO 




tH 


o_ 


LO 


co 


CO 


L0 




co 


CO LO 


CM 














































00 
CM 




oo 




oo 


LO 


00 


00 


"* 


CO 


t» 


LO 


o" 


cm" 


CO 




CO 


Ttn" 


TH 


O 


tjT co" 


T)T 








LO 


o 


t^ 


cq 


CM 


CM 


CO 


CM 


CO 


CM 


CO 


LO 


CO 




c-q 


CO 




oo 








t>. 


^H 








^M 
























■<4H 










































"- ; " 






CO 


LO 


CO 


C>) 


CO 


o 


CO 


o 


CO 


LO 


CM 


CN 


CO 


TH 


LO 


TH 


CS 


O CO 


^H 


co 






CO 


00 


LO 


r-- 


(>3 


CM 


co 


o 


TH 


o 


t^ 




CM 


TH 


CM 


LO 


t^ 


LO CO 


LO 


TH 




o 


t- 


CO 


■* 


C5 


CO 


CO 


o 


cs 


CO 


t- 




CM 


OS 


CS 


CO 


CS 


CO 


lO CO 


<ro 














































OS 
CO 




Y-* 


co 


co 


lO 




OS 


CM 




CO 


cs 


co 


o 


co 


o 


CO 


r-H 


CO 


■<* 


t-h" o6" 


CO" 








o 


LO 


CO 


CO 


TJH 


T« 


CO 




CM 


i-H 


oq 


CM 


<M 








T— 1 T-H 


CO 








CO 


































t^ 






os 


TH 


o 


LO 


OS 


T-H 


"-C 


C-3 


CO 


OS 


OS 


CO 


CO 


CS 


LO 


tH 


o 


o o 


OS 


OS 






CS 


CM 


CM 


co 


t^ 


CO 


<M 


LO 


LO 


o 


LO 


co 


LO 


TH 


CM 




o 


LO OS 


o 


o 






*# 


OS 


o 


CO 


rH 


CO 




TH 




os 


CS 




LO_ 


o 


TJH_ 


t^ 


CD 


rH 00_ 


J>^ 














































CO 

co 

CO 




t-I 


co 


Tt" 


CO 


LO 


LO 


LO 


CS 


CO 


CM 


o 


LO 


TH 


cm" 


tH 


i>T 


LO 


CS* 


tH 


OO" 




<M 


r^ 


CO 


t^ 






CM 


CM 


CM 


CM 




CM 


CM 












»o 








CO 


































t~- 








'-*' 


































1—1 






1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


o 


1 


1 


1 


1 


I 


1 


1 


1 1 


o 


CO 




eo 




















o 


















o 


CM 




i-l 




















CM 


















CM 


o 




CO 


T— | 


o 


LO 


1 


^H 


1 


CO 


o 


LO 


t^ 


1 


TH 


1 


i 


1 


1 


O LO 


CM 


CM 






CM 


CN] 


'O 


LO 




LO 




CS 


CM 


CO 


r^ 




th 










CO TH 


t^ 


OS 




^1 




o 


OS 


i-H 




LO 




LO 


OS 


t^ 


CO 














o o 


OS 














































m 








>o 


t-- 


OS 




CO 




CS 


CM 


LO 
















TH CO 


CM 


























T_l 
















CO 






o 


o 


T-H 


LO 


CO 


■* 


CM 


LO 


co 


o 


o 


[ 


co 


1 


i 


1 


1 


1 1 


os 


T+ 






CO 


TtH 


(M 


co 


t^ 


o 


CO 


r~ 


CM 


o 


o 




o 












CO 


TH 


02 


(0 


00_ 


oo 


o_ 


t^ 


^H 


N 


CM_ 


l>. 


c\ 


oq 


TH 
















CO 




H 


tH 


i>r 


t>r 


"tf 


eq* 


LO" 


io" 


co" 


co" 


LO" 


co" 


















CM* 


cm' 


K 




CO 


CO 










CM 






CM 


















00 










(cq 


































CO 






1 


1 


t^ 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


i 


I 


1 


1 1 


r~ 


t^ 


i— i 


00 






CO 

co 
































CO 
CO 


o 
o 




OS 


CO 


,-H 


1 


1 


o 


CS 


CO 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


i 


i 


1 


1 1 


LO 


OS 






CO 


s 


'M 






o 


t^ 


t^ 






















00 


00 




o 


o_ 


t^ 






OS 


CO 


CO 






















55 






C4 


co" 


t^" 


co" 






N 


cm" 
























co" 


cm' 

CO 






t^ 


00 


































o- 










































1— 1 






o 


CO 


1 


1 


1 


-+l 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


I 


I 


1 


1 1 


o 


os 






TH 


rH 








CO 


























t^ 


TH 




•■* 


■^1 


o 








-H_ 


























OS 






C<J 


co" 


«5 








N 


























o" 


o 

CO 






00 


t^ 


































CO 










































1— • 






1 


■* 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


I 


1 


1 


i 


1 


1 


1 1 


TH 


LO 




00 




MH 


































tH 


o 




e>» 




CO 


































CM 


o 




r- 


CO 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


[ 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


i 


| 


1 


1 1 


CO 


t^ 






O0 


lO 


































tH 


CM 




o 


o 


CO 


































po 






CO 


cs" 


co" 

O0 


































co" 

CO 
1—1 


LO 
CM 




CO 


CO 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


l 


1 


1 


l 


I 


1 


1 1 


CO 


TM 






CO 


CO 


































CM 


t^ 




to 




t^ 


































OS_ 






CO 


CO 


co 


































oo" 

OS 


CO' 




cs 


>o 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


i 


1 


1 


1 1 


tH 


t-^ 






0O 


o 


































OS 


CO 




o 


OS 




































o 






<CH 


co" 


co" 


































co" 

CM 


tH 




o 


CO 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


i 


1 


1 


1 1 


CO 


OS 








t^ 


































00 


t^ 




e>J 


oq_ 


■^t 


































CM_ 






^ 


cs" 


"O" 


































us 

CM 


th' 




cs 


t^ 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


I 


1 


1 


1 1 


CO 


OS 






OS 


CO 


































co 


as 




00 


o 


co 


































r-- 












































TH 




■^ 


V— 1 


o 


































1 — 1 










































CM 








CM 




































CM 






-t< 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


I 


1 


1 . 


1 1 


Th 


LO 






co 




































co 


"O 




© 


CO 




































co_ 






10 


OS 




































Os" 
CM 


LO 




Q 


3 










































w 


-u 










































a 


d 






































CO 




te 


g 




































-ts 


_o5 





o 

pq 


"o o3 

o b 

C O 


a 

o 

+s 

o 


> 

2 
o 




IS 
03 
JO 

o 


+3 

+s 
u 
!> 




o 


CD 
CO 

o 
is 

•-1 


a? 
o 

n 


a 
o 


a" 

o 

a 

< 


g 

<*5 


d 
o 




d 
o 

-t-s 
CQ 


d 
o 

B 

CD 

3 


d" 
o 

1 

1 


-4-T 

o 

i I 

1 s 

rfl CJ 

A CO 


CJ 

o 

o 

H 


c 

o 
H 



174 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



Table No. 43. — Number of Service Pipes, Meters and Fire Hydrants in the 
Several Cities and Towns supplied by the Metropolitan Water Works, Dec. 
31, 191 4, and the Number of Services and Meters installed during the Year 
1914- 



City or Town. 


Services. 


Meters. 


Fire 
Hydrants. 


Services 
Installed. 


Meters 
Installed. 


Boston, . . . . . - 


101,952 


48,360 


9,121 


1,492 


7,132 


Somerville, 














13,032 


8,499 


1,190 


230 


653 


Maiden, . 














7,684 


7,609 


561 


126 


101 


Chelsea, . 














4,864 


4,795 


373 


98 


104 


Everett, . 














5,768 


2,604 


570 


85 


346 


Quincy, . 






• 








8,930 


8,070 


1,041 


393 


690 


Medford, . 














5,442 


5,443 


635 


357 


372 


Melrose, . 














3,914 


4,131 


354 


135 


96 


Revere, x . 














4,244 


2,704 


276 


235 


709 


Watertown, 














2,573 


2,581 


364 


156 


156 


Arlington, 














2,526 


2,530 


448 


127 


130 


Milton, 














1,760 


1,760 


404 


86 


86 


Winthrop, 














2,821 


2,747 


263 


81 


80 


Stoneham, 














1,581 


1,480 


154 


48 


149 


Belmont, . 














1,330 


1,330 


230 


102 


102 


Lexington, 














1,113 


947 


187 


50 


106 


Nahant, . 














655 


378 


100 


25 


41 


Swampscott, 














1,748 


1,748 


172 


58 


58 


Totals, 


171,937 


107,716 


16,443 


3,884 


11,111 



1 Includes small portion of Saugus. 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



175 






50 
CO 

e 






Dq 



© § 

•8 I 

co" § 

"*S ."§ 

©i r£S 

fe CO 

g © 
£ ©■ 

•<S> ^ 



■55 

©> 



6 

< 





£ M £ 




10 


CO 





CO 


CD 




00 


00 


-* 


CO 











H 


Nil 

<1 Eh f=, 02 

^ £ o 


•mnuiraij^r 


10 

CM 


U5 
CM 


10 

CM 


10 

CM 


CM 


CM 


CM 


CM 


CM 


CM 


10 

CM 


10 

CM 


CM 


> 
W 

w 
o 
































CO 


CM 


_ 


CO 






O 














•uinuiixej^ 


CN 


CO 
CM 


CD 
CM 


CO 
CM 


co 

CM 


CO 
CM 


CD 
CM 


CD 
(M 


CD 
CM 


co 

CM 


CO 
CSI 


CO 
CM 


CD 
CM 


































i B - 
O H H |5 
B En O o 
£ ^ E ^ . 

° H M W g 

^ m B » 

° o £ — 

B Ch P rt 


































^H 


rH 


CM 


CM 


rH 


CM 


CO 


CM 


O 


^H 


"<* 


CO 


CM 


•uinuiiutj\[ 


CO 
(M 


CO 
CM 


CO 
CM 


CO 
CM 


CO 
CM 


CO 
CM 


CO 
CM 


CO 
CM 


co 

CM 


CO 
CM 


CO 
<M 


CO 
CM 


CO 
CM 


H 






























W 
Eh 
P 

o 
































CO 


CD 


t^ 


CO 


t^ 


1^ 


O0 


t^ 


O0 


CO 


C5 


00 


r-- 


</j 


•tunuiix'Bj^ 


CM 


•<* 
CM 


CM 


CM 


CM 


'CM 
CM 


CM 


CM 


CM 


CM 


•>* 

CM 


•<* 

CM 


CM 




H 




CO 


10 


00 


LO 


IC 


O 


CO 


CO 


tH 


t^ 


CO 


"# 


CO 




-< p 


•ranuiraij\[ 


O 


10 


10 


lO 


iO 


lO 


Hi 


»o 


10 


lO 


10 


lO 


10 




S o 
































2« 






























































K B 




rt< 


TtH 


U0 


lO 


CD 


iffl 


CO 


CO 


<* 


CO 


CD 


CO 


10 




O |3 

o 
o 


•uinxnixBj\[ 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CD 


CD 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CD 


CD 


CD 


co 




B „ri 
S * I 
5 ° I 




CM 


CM 


CO 


CM 


CM 


CO 


CM 


CM 


CO 


CM 


CO 


CO 


CM 




•uinuiiuij^ 


CO 


CD 


CD 


CD 


CD 


CD 


CD 


CD 


CO 


CO 


CD 


co 


CO 




P * H 
































> OB CQ 

«B* 
g H 
J P H 
«1 P B 
































>o 


in 


>n 


CO 


CD 


t- 


CD 


CD 


CO 


CO 


ir^ 


l~-. 


CO 




•ttrnraprej^ 


CD 


CO 


CD 


CD 


CO 


CO 


CD 


CO 


CD 


CD 


CO 


CD 


CO 


































Eh 
































d J § • 




CO 


CO 


CM 


,_ 


y— ( 


1 


CO 


CO 


*# 


CO 


CO 


CM 


CO 




•iunuiintj,\[ 


CO 


co 


CO 


CO 


CD 




CD 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CD 
































H ^ * 8 

g S W M 
O cj £ 




t^ 


CO 


CD 


O0 


CD 


1 


r^ 


t^ 


00 


00 


t^ 


l^ 


t^ 




, uinuiix'Bj\[ 


CO 


CO 


CD 


co 


CO 




CD 


CO 


CD 


CO 


CD 


CO 


CO 


H 


< 






























w 




CO 


CO 


CM 


CO 


CM 







i— H 


CM 






rH 


CM 


o 

M 


o^2 • 


•xnnuitnij\[ 


CO 


CD 


CO 


CO 


CD 


CO 


CD 


CO 


CO 


CD 


CO 


CD 


CO 


> 






























02 


OShSM 
* u £ 






























































I-~ 


O 


t~ 


t>- 


t~- 


t^ 


I>. 


CD 


CD 


CD 


CD 


lO 


CO 


o 

Hi 


•inmiiix'Bj\[ 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CD 


CO 


CD 


CD 


CD 


co 


CD 


CD 


CO 








CN 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CM 


CM 


CO 


CM 


CM 


CO 


CM 


CM 


CM 




« w 


•uinuituij\[ 


CO 


CD 


CD 


CO 


CO 


CD 


CO 


CD 


co 


CO 


CO 


CD 


CD 




KgO 
































O Eh > 
































fe m B 




























































o^h 
































HSm 




U3 


IO 


CD 


t^ 


t^ 


t^ 


t^ 


CD 


CD 


CD 


CD 


CO 


CO 




a H 


•uinuitx^j\[ 


CO 


CO 


CD 


CO 


CO 


CD 


CO 


CD 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 




GO 

£ p Q . 

o ° « ^ 
g W < H 




C5 


O 


t- 


CO 


CO 


CO 


00 


!>■ 


00 


CO 


I-~ 


CD 


00 




•uinuiiuij\r 


CO 


t-~ 


CD 


CD 


CD 


CD 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CD 


CD 


CD 


CO 


































&3 r -, > W 
































































»o 


»o 


■<* 


CO 


CO 


CD 


10 


^ 


CO 


CD 


CO 


r^ 


CO 




•ranuiixBj\[ 


t^ 


t-~ 


t^ 


t^ 




t— 


l^ 


r^ 


t>- 


t>. 


!>. 


I>- 


t^ 
































H, P W • 

JOUH 




■<* 


«* 




C2 


CO 


O 




•* 


CM 


-H 


lO 


•* 






•uinuiinij^; 


CO 


CO 


"* 


CO 


■"* 


•* 


"1*1 


-* 


-# 


H* 


"* 


■* 


■"# 


































? a fc w 
































=£ H fe 5 
§ S ^ 1 

OB 
|Z| 

w 
































t^ 


>o 


CM 


<* 


lO 


-+l 


•V 


-* 


■* 


CO 


CO 


CM 


CM 




•UinUIIXBJ\[ 


in 


>o 


CO 


co 


CO 


CD 


co 


CO 


CD 


CO 


co 


CD 


CD 




































































W 




. 














U 




u 


U 


m 





T-i 
T-1 


C 


C 
83 


>> 

a 

>-. 
O 




'u 

P. 

< 


>> 

c3 


O 

1-3 




H-> 

B 

< 


s 

ft 
O 

CO 


(J" 

CD 







s 




a 


Q 


bC 
a 

hi 

< 



176 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 





o 
O 



©• 



•<s> 

O 

ss 

o 

CO 

© 

cq 

© 

p-© 



©i 
••^ 
cx> 

133 

-to 

© 



^3 



©• 



©5 
©> 



6 

H 
pq 

H 



K w H 


INGTON 
N HALL, 
CHUSETTS 
ENUE. 




00 


00 


00 


l-^ 


CO 


m 


CM 




o 


CM 


t^ 


US 


- 1 


•ranuiraij^ 


hHH 


•>* 


H* 


o 


C5 
CO 


C3 
CO 


■<# 


•>* 


H* 


H* 


TtH 


"# 


■>* 


E- 1 ^ 5 




























































X fe < > 

a £ K <! 

^ O 33 ^ 
W Eh << 

3 




^H 


OS 


cz> 


CM 


CM 


^ 


lO 


CO 


■* 


CO 


O 


C5 


Ir^ 


•umunx'Bj\[ 


CO 


CM 


CO 

H*l 


CO 


CO 

<* 


"* 


CM 


CM 

■<CM 


CM 


CM 


CO 

hHH 


CM 

-<* 


CM 




Ph ^* 




-* 


CM 


CO 


CO 


^H 




C55 


00 


OS 






C5 


CM 




° d * Fh 

w m ■" a 


•ranraiuij^; 


t~ 


t-~ 


!>• 


b- 


t^ 


CO 


CO 


t>. 


CO 


t^. 


CO 


l>- 


t^ 




a w g „ 

e » g a 

g > a h 

S5 a* 3 

EH 






























































00 


t>- 


r>- 


CO 


<!H 


lO 


■* 


TH 


CO 


t--. 




CO 


t^ 




■umuiixi3j\[ 


00 


oo- 


oc 


00 


00 


00 


00 


CO 


00 


CO 


OS 


C3 


CO 




a fc 
































fc 




00 


o 


CO 


CO 


00 


00 


o 


CO 


00 


C75 




■* 


■<* 




Szg 


■ranunuij^ 


lO 


m 


lO 


lO 


H* 


o 


CO 


CO 


CO 


■* 


us 


US 


■* 




03 


CM 


CM 


CM 


CM 


CM 


CM 


CM 


CM 


CM 


CM 


CM 


CM 




z a 5 
































* a & 


























































H 


5 § <* 

:z a to 




t^ 


o 


CO 


CO 


^ H 




00 


00 










^ 


- uinuiixBj\[ 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


lO 


lO 


us 


US 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 




^ 2 


(M 


CM 


CM 


CM 


CM 


CM 


CM 


CM 


CM 


CM 


CM 


CM 


CM 


a 

m 


j a 






























33 

g|gg 

> « & «J 

« Eh O £ 




C3 


f^ 


00 


1-- 


o 


CO 


o 


■<* 


r~ 


CO 


US 


t~ 






■umuinnj\[ 


lO 


iO 


lO 


in 


LO 


CO 


"5 


■* 


TfH 


US 


US 


US 


"3 


a 

o 


C^l 


CM 


CM 


CM 


CM 


CM 


CM 


CM 


CM 


CM 


CM 


CM 


CM 




t^ 


lO 


00 


r~ 


CO 


o 


C5 


C5 


O 




CO 


CO 


H* 


a 


•umunxejij 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


i« 


US 


US 


CO 


CO 


co 


CO 


CO 


« 


<t pq 


CM 


C-5 


CM 


CM 


CM 


CM 


CM 


CM 


CM 


CM 


CM 


CM 


CM 


a 

a 


pi 




























































W 






US 


iO 


CO 


lO 


CO 


l>- 


^ 


CM 


CM 


CO 


hcH 


us 


CO 





•uinuixui^ 


CO 
CM 


CO 
CM 


CO 
CM 


CO 
CM 


CO 
CM 


lO 
CM 


CO 
CM 


CO 


CO 
CM 


CO 
CM 


CO 
CM 


CO 
CM 


CO 
CM 






























































<; ^ 




































o 


o 


o 


C5 


Ci 


r~ 


l~~ 


CO 


CO 


05 


O 


CS> 


c» 




•tunuiix'Bj\[ 


CM 


CM 


CM 


CO 
CM 


CO 
CM 


CO 
CM 


CO 
CM 


CO 
CM 


CO 
CM 


CO 
CM 


CM 


CO 
CM 


CO 
CM 




J fn < . 

J tC Q Eh 






O 


O 


O 


CO 




CO 


OS 


US 


CO 


C5 


o 


!>. 




•uininiuij\[ 


»o 


lO 


US 


u> 


hcH 


CO 


HCH 


H* 


Th 


H* 


"* 


US 


^H 




CM 


CM 


CM 


CM 


CM 


CM 


CM 


CM 


CM 


CM 


c-q 


CM 


CM 




i^Sa 

•S Oh 2 Eh 
33 & Eh 
































O 


o 


C5 


C3 


00 


00 


00 


CO 


CO 


CO 


o 


o 


OS 




•umunxT3j<\[ 


CM 


CM 


CO 
CM 


CO 
CM 


CO 
CM 


CO 
CM 


CO 
CM 


CO 
CM 


CO 
CM 


CO 
CM 


CM 


CM 


CO 
CM 




DO 




o 


o 


o 




00 




Oi 


CM 


00 




"* 


CO 


O 




•uinuimij\[ 


CM 

CM 


CM 

CM 


CM 
CM 


CM 

CM 


CM 


CM 


CM 


CM 
CM 


CM 


CM 

CM 


CM 
CM 


CM 
CM 


CM 
CM 




£ fe ^ 

2 ? o 
B « a 




























































< 




T—l 


1 , 


CM 


CM 


CM 


CM 


CO 


CM 


CM 


o 


CM 


CO 


CM i 


CD 


■uinuiixT?j\[ 


•<CH 


CM 


CM 


CM 


CM 


hcH 
CM 


•<CH 
CM 


H* 

CM 


CM 


CM 


CM 


->cH 
CM 


CM 


3 


p 




























































U 
































a 


a 






00 


OS 


O 


00 


,__! 


O 


y—, 


00 


^H 


CO 


"* 


C5 


o 
O 


10 S 5h" 

a P G 

tf Eh 2 

o ■, a 

fe d 
a 


•uinuiiuij\[ 


CM 

CM 


CM 
C^J 


CM 
CM 


CO 
CM 


CM 

CM 


CM 

CM 


CO 
CM 


CO 
CM 


CM 
CM 


CO 
CM 


CO 
CM 


CO 
CM 


CM 
CM 


1 


























































a 




C<l 


o 


CO 


** 


CO 


■* 


us 


CO 


CO 


CM 


"# 


»cH 


CO 


> 


•rantuixt3j\[ 


CM 


•>* 

CM 


CM 


CM 


CM 


CM 


CM 


CM 


CM 


CM 


CM 


CM 


CM 


aa 33 

. « <! . 

^ Eh 






>* 


CO 


CO 


CO 


C-l 


00 


C5 


!>• 


CO 


C35 


cs> 


CO 




•ranuiitnj^ 


CO 
CM 


CO 
CM 


CO 
CM 


CO 
CM 


CO 
CM 


co 
cq 


CO 
CM 


CO 
CM 


CO 
CM 


CO 
CM 


CO 
CM 


CO 
CM 


CO 
CM 




o fe <j a 
eh ^ .a 
d K a a 






























w 


























































a 


5 a o eh 

<5 Eh « 33 

P o 




00 


00 


C5 


o 


o 


^H 


,-H 


i— l 


o 


o 


O 


o 


o 


a 


•tunuiix'Bj/\[ 


CM 


(M 


CM 


CM 


CM 


lO 
CM 


US 
CM 


US 
CM 


US 
CM 


CM 


lO 
CM 


CM 


US 
CM 


a 

EH 

a 






























8 i • 






























O 


Z O > h 




t^ 


l~^ 


CO 


CO 


lO 


00 




US 


C5 


CM 


CO 


o 


CO 


32 


•uinraiuij\[ 


CM 


CM 


CM 


CM 


CO 
CM 


CM 


CO 
CM 


CO 
CM 


CM 


CM 


CM 


lO 
CM 


CM 




S „ P Eh 




























































j a „«5 
































a g Oh Jh 






_ 


OS 


C5 


CO 


O 


00 


TJH 


CO 


T-H 


O 


o 


C5 




•uinuiixBj\[ 


CO 
CM 


CO 
CM 


CM 


CM 


lO 
C-5 


CO 
CM 


CM 


US 
CM 


US 
CM 


CO 

CM 


CO 
CM 


CO 
CM 


US 
<M 




1-1 


a 

EH 


>^ 
















Sh~ 




e 

> 
o 


© 



M 
c3 




0) 


O 


cS 

a 
a 

c3 
H-5 


F3 

a 
o 


J3 
U 

u 

c3 


a 
< 


c3 


<£ 
a 

a 

•-a 


3 


CO 

a 

M 

a 
<1 


d 

H-3 

a 

o 
02 


6 
o 

o 


a 

CD 
O 

n 


CU 
> 
< 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



177 



Appendix No. 3. 



Water Works Statistics for the Year 1914. 
The Metropolitan Water Works supply the Metropolitan Water Dis- 
trict which includes the following cities and towns: — 



City or Town. 


Population, 
Census of 1910. 


Estimated 
Population, 
July 1, 1914. 


Boston, 


670,585 


747,830 


Somerville, 




















77,236 


84,530 


Maiden, 




















44,404 


48,950 


Chelsea, 




















32,452 


36,910 


Newton, 1 . 




















39,806 


43,590 


Everett, 




















33,484 


38,500 


Quincy, 




















32,642 


36,410 


Medforcl, . 




















23,150 


26,430 


Hyde Park, 




















15,507 


- 2 


Melrose, 




















15,715 


16,920 


Revere, 




















18,219 


21,460 


Watertown, 




















12,875 


14,430 


Arlington, 




















11,187 


12,970 


Milton, 




















7,924 


8,630 


Winthrop, . 




















10,132 


11,820 


Stoneham, 




















7,090 


8,070 


Swampscott, 




















6,204 


6,770 


Lexington, 




















4,918 


5,550 


Belmont, . 




















5,542 


6,560 


Nahant, 




















1,184 


1,440 


Total population of Metropolitan Water District, 


1,070,256 


1,177,770 


Saugus, 3 






280 


280 



1 No water supplied during the year from Metropolitan Water Works. 

2 Included in Boston. 

3 Only a small portion of Saugus was supplied with water. 



178 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



Pumping. 
Chestnut Hill Pumping Station No. 1: — 

Builders of pumping machine^, Holly Manufacturing Company, Quintard 
Iron Works and E. P. Allis Company. 

Description of coal used : — Bituminous : Beaver Run and Sterling. Anthra- 
cite: buckwheat. Price per gross ton in bins: bituminous $4.10, buckwheat 
$3.16. Average price per gross ton $4.02. Per cent, ashes 12.7. 

Chestnut Hill Pumping Station No. 2: — 

Builders of pumping machinery, Holly Manufacturing Company. 

Description of coal used: — Bituminous: Beaver Run and Sterling. Anthra- 
cite: buckwheat. Price per gross ton in bins: bituminous $4, buckwheat, 
$2.84 to $2.90. Average price per gross ton $3.86. Per cent, ashes 12.3. 

Spot Pond Station: — 

Builders of pumping machinery, Geo. F. Blake Manufacturing Company and 
Holly Manufacturing Company. 

Description of coal used :— Bituminous : New River. Anthracite: screenings. 
Price per gross ton in bins : bituminous $5.08 to $5.13, screenings $2.50. Aver- 
age price per gross ton $4.66. Per cent, ashes 12.2. 





Chestnut Hill Pumping Stations. 




No. 1. 


No. 2. 




Engines 

Nos. 
1 and 2. 


Engine 
No. 3. 


Engine 
No. 4. 


Engine 
No. 12. 


Daily pumping capacity (gallons), .... 


16,000,000 


20,000,000 


30,000,000 


40,000,000 


Coal consumed for year (pounds), . . 


1,071,135 


15,455 


790,635 


7,198,460 


Cost of pumping, figured on pumping station ex- 


$7,228.71 


$242.63 


$9,849.68 


$26,694.15 


penses. 
Total pumpage for year, corrected for slip (million 

gallons). 
Average dynamic head (feet), . . . . . 


367.03 


14.92 


1,128.61 


10,786.30 


133.12 


117.43 


119.62 


122.26 


Gallons pumped per pound of coal 


342.66 


965.38 


1,427.47 


1,498.42 


Duty on basis of plunger displacement, 


39,180,000 


98,760,000 


145,100,000 


155,700,000 


Cost per million gallons raised to reservoir, 


$19.6951 


$16.2621 


$8.7273 


$2.4748 


Cost per million gallons raised one foot, 


.1479 


.1385 


.0730 


.0202 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



179 



Daily pumping capacity (gallons), 

Coal consumed for year (pounds), . • . . . 
Cost of pumping, figured on pumping station expenses, 
Total pumpage for year, corrected for slip (million gallons), 
Average dynamic head (feet), 
Gallons pumped per pound of coal, 
Duty on basis of plunger displacement, 
Cost per million gallons raised to reservoir, . 
Cost per million gallons raised one foot, 



Chestnut Hill 

Pumping 
Station No. 2. 



Engines Nos. 5, 
6 and 7. 



105,000,000 

4,579,640 

§29,986.00 

13,227.75 

40.18 

2,888.38 

98,650,000 

$2.2669 

.0564 



Spot Pond 
Station. 



Engines Nos. 
and 9. 



30,000,000 

2,412,976 

$15,394.11 

2,688.88 

131.84 

1,114.34 

124,870,000 

$5.7251 

.0434 



Consumption. 

Estimated total population of the eighteen cities and towns 

supplied wholly or partially during the year 1914, 
Total consumption (gallons), pump basis, . . . . . 
Average daily consumption (gallons), pump basis, .-...' 
Gallons per day to each inhabitant, pump basis, . . 



1,134,180 

38,882,770,000 

106,528,000 

93.9 



Distribution. 



Owned and 
operated by 
Metropolitan 

Water 

and Sewerage 

Board. 



Total in District 

supplied 
by Metropolitan 

Water Works. 



Kinds of pipe used, 

Sizes, 

Extensions, less length abandoned (miles), 
Length in use (miles), .... 

Stop-gates added, 

Stop-gates now in use 

Service pipes added, . «. . 

Service pipes now in use, 

Meters added, 

Meters now in use, 

Fire hydrants added, .... 
Fire hydrants now in use, 



_i 

60-4 inch. 

2.95 

119.05 

14 

506 



60-4 inch. 

34.95 

1,813.95 



3,882 

171,884 

11,109 

107,704 

556 

16,443 



1 Cast-iron, cement-lined wrought-iron, cement-lined steel and kalamine pipe. 



180 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



Appendix No. 4. 



Contracts made and pending during 
Contracts relating to the 



10 



l. 

Number 

of 
Contract. 



2. 

WORK. 



102i 



103 1 



104i 



105i 



106i 



107i 



110 



111 



112 



114 



Reconstruction of part of Sec- 
tion 30, North Metropolitan 
System in Cambridge. 

Section 70, New Mystic sewer, 
North Metropolitan System 
in Winchester. 

Section 68, New Mystic sewer, 
North Metropolitan System 
in Winchester. 

Section 48A, North Metropoli- 
tan System in Somerville 
and Medford. 

425 tons of coal for Alewife 
Brook pumping station. 

6,800 tons of coal: — 
2,700 tons for Deer Island 

pumping station. 
3,000 tons for East Boston 

pumping station. 
1,100 tons for Charlestown 

pumping station. 

Part of Section 69, Station to 
Station 23 + 0, New Mystic 
sewer, North Metropolitan 
System in Winchester. 



Part of Section 69, Station 23 
+ to Station 49 + 69, New 
Mystic sewer, North Met- 
ropolitan System in Win- 
chester. 



Section 57A, Revere Exten- 
sion, North Metropolitan 
System in Chelsea and 
Revere. 



425 tons of coal for Alewife 
Brook pumping station. 



3. 

Num- 
ber of 
Bids. 



Amount of Bid. 



Next to 
Lowest. 



5. 

Lowest. 



),195 00 



39,116 50 



77,748 20 



2,101 40 



34,975 00 



61,365 75 



3,368 70 



$7,805 00 2 



37,555 00 2 



67,535 00 2 



1,876 752 



5.15 per 
ton. 2 



S4.62 per 
ton. 2 

54.54 per 
ton. 2 

}4.54 per 
ton. 2 

$33,360 00 2 



53,616 00 2 



3,360 00 2 



5.15 per 

ton. 2 



6. 

Contractor. 



Wm. J. Barry, Boston. 



Ross and Barbaro, 
Winchester. 



G. M. Bryne Co., Bos- 
ton. 



Antony Cefalo, Bos- 
ton. 



Locke Coal Company, 
Maiden. 



Metropolitan Coal Co., 
Boston. 



The Henry Spinach 
Contracting Co., 
Waterbury, Conn. 



The Henry Spinach 
Contracting Co., 
Waterbury, Conn. 



G. M. Bryne Co., Bos- 
ton. 



Locke Coal Company, 
Maiden. 



1 Contract completed. 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



181 



Appendix No. 4 . 



the Year 1914 — Sewerage Works. 
North Metropolitan System. 



7. 


8. 


9. 


10. 




Date of Con- 
tract. 


Date of 

Completion 

of Work. 


Prices of Principal Items of Contracts 
made in 1914. 


Value of 

Work done 

Dec. 31, 

1914. 




May 1, 1913 


Aug. 16, 1913 


- 


$8,162 69 


1 


Apr. 9, 1913 


May 4, 1914 


- " 


33,273 75 


2 


June 11, 1913 


Dec. 31, 1913 


- 


70,035 54 


3 


June 28, 1913 


Aug. 23, 1913 


- 


1,644 15 


4 


June 23, 1913 


July 1, 1914 


- 


2,086 19 


5 


June 23, 1913 


July 1, 1914 


- 


30,340 17 


6 


Jan. 2, 1914 


Nov. 7, 1914 


For earth, excavation and refilling in trench and em- 
bankment for 42-inch concrete sewer, $8 per lin. ft. ; 
for Portland cement brick masonry in manholes and 
special structures, $20 per cu. yd.; for Portland 
cement concrete masonry in trench and special 
structures, $8 per cu. yd. ; for spruce piles in trench 
in place, $0.30 per lin. ft. 


32,175 21 


7 


Jan. 2, 1914 


Dec. 19, 1914 


For earth excavation and refilling in trench and em- 
bankment for 36-inch concrete sewer, $14 per lin. ft. ; 
for Portland cement brick masonry in manholes and 
special structures, $14 per cu. yd.; for Portland 
cement concrete masonry in trench and special 
structures, $9 per cu. yd. ; for spruce piles in trench 
in place, $0.30 per lin. ft. 


46,018 97 


8 


May 12, 1914 


July 10, 1914 


For earth excavation and refilling in trench for 15- 
inch vitrified pipe sewer, $2 per lin. ft. ; for Portland 
cement brick masonry in manholes, $16 per cu. yd.; 
for Portland cement concrete masonry in trench, 
$7.50 per cu. yd. 


3,005 45 


9 


June 26, 1914 


- 


$5.15 per ton of 2,240 pounds delivered in bins at 
Alewifo Brook pumping station. 


598 69 


10 



2 Contract based upon this bid. 



182 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



Contracts relating to the 





1. 

Number 

of 
Contract. 


2. 
WORK. 


3. 

Num- 
ber of 
Bids. 


Amount of Bid. 


6. 




4. 

Next to 
Lowest. 


5. 

Lowest. 


Contractor. 


11 

12 

13 

14 


115 

1181 

119i 
121 


6,900 tons of coal: — 
2,700 tons for Deer Island 

pumping station. 
3,000 tons for East Boston 

pumping station. 
1,200 tons for Charlestown 

pumping station. 

Repairing and furnishing 
doors, windows and moni- 
tors at East Boston pump- 
ing station. 

Repairing existing skylights 
at East Boston pumping 
station and locker building. 

New screen-house at East Bos- 
ton pumping station. 


2 
3 
2 

1 

1 

7 


$4.63 per 

ton. 
$4.51 per 

ton. 
$4.53 per 

ton. 

$7,867 00 


$3.98 per 
ton. 2 

$3.98 per 
ton. 2 

$4.24 per 
ton. 2 

$3,675 00 2 

695 00 2 
7,200 00 2 


Gorman-Leonard Coal 
Co., Boston. 

S. H. Pomeroy Co., 
New York City. 

E. Van Noorden & 
Co., Roxbury. 

J. Caddigan Company, 
Boston. 



Contracts made and pending during 
Contracts relating to the 





1. 

Number 

of 
Contract. 


2. 

WORK. 


3. 

Num- 
ber of 
Bids. 


Amount 


of Bid. 


6. 




4. 

Next to 
Lowest. 


5. 

Lowest. 


Contractor. 


1 


108 1 


2,650 tons of coal: — 
2,200 tons for Ward Street 

pumping station. 
450 tons for Nut Island 
screen-house. 


1 
1 


- 


$5.15 per 
ton. 2 

$4.78 per 
ton. 2 


Metropolitan Coal Co., 
Boston. 


2 


1091 


425 tons of coal for Quincy 
pumping station. 


1 


- 


$5.10 per 
ton. 2 


Frost Coal Company, 
Boston. 


3 


1131 


Cast-iron pipe and special 
castings for Section 43, High- 
level sewer, South Metro- 
politan System in Quincy. 


4 


$17,754 70 


$17,673 80 2 


Camden Iron Works, 
Camden, N. J. 


4 


116 


2,650 tons of coal: — 
2,200 tons for Ward Street 

pumping station. 
450 tons for Nut Island 
screen-house. 


2 
2 


$5.15 per 

ton. 
$4.79 per 

ton. 


$4.85 per 
ton. 2 

$4.35 per 
ton.i 


Gorman-Leonard Coal 
Co., Boston. 


5 


117 


450 tons of coal for Quincy 
pumping station. 


2 


$4.98 per 
ton. 


$4.80 per 
ton. 2 


Frost Coal Company, 
Boston. 


6 


120 


Section 43, Relief Outfall, 
High-level sewer, South 
Metropolitan System in 
Quincy. 


8 


$36,310 00 


$34,790 00 2 


W. H. Ellis & Son Co., 
East Boston. 


7 


122 


Section 70, Siphon crossing, 
High-level sewer, South 
Metropolitan System in 
West Roxbury. 


4 


5,250 00 


4,500 00 2 


Charles A. Haskin, 
Charlestown. 



Contract completed. 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



183 



North Metropolitan System — Concluded. 



Date of Con- 
tract. 



8. 

Date of 

Completion 

of Work. 



Prices of Principal Items of Contracts 
made in 1914. 



10. 

Value of 

Work done 

Dec. 31, 

1914. 



June 26, 1914 



July 24, 1914 



July 25, 1914 



Oct. 1, 1914 



Dec. 11, 1914 



Aug. 21, 1914 



3.98 per ton of 2,240 pounds delivered in bins at Deer 

Island pumping station. 
3.98 per ton of 2,240 pounds delivered in bins at East 

Boston pumping station. 
1.24 per ton of 2,240 pounds delivered in bins at 

Charlestown pumping station. 



For whole work, $3,675. 



For whole work, $695. 



For whole work, $7,200. 



1,141 53 



3,675 00 



695 00 



4,250 00 



11 



12, 



15 



14 



the Year 1914 — Sewerage Works — Continued. 
South Metropolitan System. 



7. 

Date of Con- 
tract. 



8. 

Date of 

Completion 

of Work. 



Prices of Principal Items of Contracts 
made in 1914. 



10. 

Value of 

Work done 

Dec. 31, 

1914. 



June 23, 1913 

June 23, 1913 
July 15, 1914 

June 36, 1914 

June 26, 1914 
Aug. 29, 1914 

Nov. 21, 1914 



July 1, 1914 



July 1, 1914 



Nov. 7, 1914 



For 60-inch straight pipe, $22.90 per ton of 2,000 
pounds; for 60-inch pipe with turned spigots, $23.40 
per ton of 2,000 pounds; for 60-inch pipe with 
scored bells, $23.40 per ton of 2,000 pounds; for 
special castings, $65 per ton of 2,000 pounds. 

$4.85 per ton of 2,240 pounds delivered in bins at Ward 

Street pumping station. • 
$4.35 per ton of 2,240 pounds delivered on wharf at 

Nut Island screen-house. 



$4.80 per ton of 2,240 pounds delivered in bins at 
Quincy pumping station. 

For laying 60-inch cast-iron outfall pipes, $18.42 per 
lin. ft.; for piling and masonry reinforcement of 
outlet, $6,502; for Portland cement concrete 
masonry in trench, $10 per cu. yd. 

For whole work, $1,500. 



5,262 88 1 



1,578 86 
17,799 90 

4,264 42 

459 91 
9,314 06 



2 Contract based upon this bid. 



184 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



Contracts made and pending during the Year 1914 

— Concluded. 
Summary of Contracts. 



Sewerage Works 



Value of 

Work done Dec. 

31, 1914. 



North Metropolitan System, 14 contracts, 

South Metropolitan System, 7 contracts, 

Total of 21 contracts made and pending during the year 1914, 



$247,102 34 
46,680 03 



1293,782 37 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 185 



Appendix No. 5. 



FINANCIAL STATEMENT PRESENTED TO THE GENERAL COURT 

ON JANUARY 20, 1914. 

The Metropolitan Water and Sewerage Board respectfully presents 
the following abstract of the account of its receipts, expenditures, 
disbursements, assets and liabilities for the year ending November 
30, 1914, together with recommendations for legislation which it 
deems desirable, in accordance with the provisions of chapter 235 of 
the Acts of the year 1906. 

Metropolitan Watee Works. 

Construction. 
The loans authorized for expenditures under the Metropolitan 
Water acts, the receipts which are added to the loan fund, the ex- 
penditures for the construction and acquisition of works, and the 
balance available on December 1, 1914, have been as follows: — 

Loans authorized under Metropolitan Water acts, . . . $42,798,000 00 
Receipt from town of Swampscott for admission to Metropoli- 
tan Water District, paid into Loan Fund (St. 1909, c. 320), 90,000 00 
Receipts from the sales of property which are placed to the 
credit of the Metropolitan Water Loan Fund : — 
' For the year ending November 30, 1914, . $17,452 62 
For the period prior to December 1, 1913, 225,458 60 

242,911 22 



$43,130,911 22 
Amount approved for payment by the Board out of the 
Metropolitan Water Loan Fund : — 

For the year ending November 30, 1914, . $149,916 91 
For the period prior to December 1, 1913, 42,236,474 52 

42,386,391 43 

Balance December 1, 1914, $744,519 79 

The amount of the Metropolitan Water Loan bonds issued at the 
end of the fiscal year was $42,046,000. bonds to the amount of 
$258,000 having been issued during the year. Of the amount issue* I, 
$41,398,000 were sinking fund bonds, and the remainder, amounting 
to $048,000, were issued as serial bonds. 



186 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

At the end of the year the amount of the outstanding bonds was 
$42,021,000, as bonds issued on the serial payment plan to the 
amount of $25,000 had been paid. During the fiscal year, $10,000 
in serial bonds has been paid. 

The Metropolitan Water Loan Sinking Eund amounted, on De- 
cember 1, 1914, to $11,533,453.45, an increase during the year of 
$767,940.80. 

The net debt on December 1, 1914, was $30,487,546.55, a de- 
crease during the fiscal year of $777,940.80. 

Maintenance. 

Amount appropriated for the maintenance and 
operation of works, for the year ending No- 
vember 30, 1914, $450,551 91 

Special appropriation for protection of water 
supply in aqueducts (1911) remaining, . . 9,930 60 

Special appropriations for protection and im- 
provement of the water supply (1912 and 
1913) remaining, ...... 35,143 37 

Receipts credited to this fund for year ending 

November 30, 1914, . . . . . . 50,607 73 

$546,233 61 

Amount approved by Board for maintenance and operation of 

works during year ending November 30, 1914, . . . 424,241 28 

Balance December 1, 1914, . . . . . . . $121,992 33 

This balance includes the sum of $9,930.60, the amount remaining 
unexpended of the special appropriation for the protection of the 
water supply in aqueducts, and the sums of $15,294.67, the amount 
remaining unexpended of the special appropriation in 1912, and 
$19,848.70, of the special appropriation in 1913 for the protection 
and improvement of the water supply. 

The Board has also received during the year ending November 
30, 1914, $50,607.73 from rentals, the sale of land, land products 
and power and from other proceeds from the operations of the 
Board, which, according to section 18 of the Metropolitan Water 
Act, are applied by the Treasurer of the Commonwealth to the 
payment of interest on the Metropolitan Water Loan, to sinking 
fund requirements, and expenses of maintenance and operation of 
works, in reduction of the amount to be assessed upon the Metro- 
politan Water District for the year. 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 187 

Sums received from sales of water to municipalities not belonging 
to the District and to water companies, and from municipalities for 
admission to the District, have been applied as follows : — 

For the period prior to December 1, 1906, distributed to the 
cities and towns of the District, as provided by section 3 of 
the Metropolitan Water Act, . . . . . . . $219,865 65 

For the period beginning December 1, 1906, and prior to Decem- 
ber 1, 1913, applied to the Metropolitan Water Loan Sinking 
Fund, as provided by chapter 238 of the Acts of 1907, . . 46,172 46 

For the year beginning December 1, 1913, and ending Novem- 
ber 30, 1914, applied to the Metropolitan Water Loan Sinking 
Fund, as provided by said last-named act, . . . . . 5,396 65 



$271,434 7.6 



Metropolitan Sewerage Works. 

Construction. 

The loans authorized under the various acts of the Legislature 
for the construction of the Metropolitan Sewerage Works, the re- 
ceipts which are added to the proceeds of the loans, and the expen- 
ditures for construction, are given below, as follows : — 

North Metropolitan System. 

Loans authorized for expenditures for construc- 
tion under the various acts, including those 
for the Revere, Belmont and Maiden exten- 
sions, North System enlargements and ex- 
tensions, New Mystic Sewer and Deer Island 
outfall extension, . . . . . $7,144,365 73 

Receipts from sales of real estate and from mis- 
cellaneous sources, which are placed to the 
credit of the North Metropolitan System : — 

For the year ending November 30, 1914, . ' 184 20 

For the period prior to December 1, 1913, . 85,179 32 

Amount approved for payment by the Board 1 
out of the Metropolitan Sewerage Loan Fund, 
North System : — ■ 

For the year ending November 30, 1914, . $139,750 67 

For the period prior to December 1, 1913, . 6,944,632 81 



$7,229,729 25 $7,084,383 48 
Balance December 1, 1914, $145,345 77 

1 The word " Board " refers to the Metropolitan Sewerage Commission and its successor, the Metro- 
politan Water and Sewerage Board. 



188 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 



South Metropolitan System. 

Loans authorized for expenditures for construc- 
tion under the various acts, applied to the 
construction of the Charles River valley 
sewer, Neponset valley sewer, High-level 
sewer and extension, . . .... $8,867,046 27 

Receipts from pumping, sales of real estate and 
from miscellaneous sources, which are placed 
to the credit of the South Metropolitan 
System : — 
For the year ending November 30, 1914, . 10 66 

For the period prior to December 1, 1913, . 14,081 35 

Amount approved by the Board for payment 
as follows : — 

On account of the Charles River valley sewer, $800,046 27 

On account of the Neponset valley sewer, . 911,531 46 

On account of the High-level sewer and . 
extension : — 

For the year ending November 30, 

1914, ' 29,158 04 

For the period prior to December 1, 

1913, 7,109,993 95 



$8,881,138 28 $8,850,729 72' 
Balance December 1, 1914, $30,408 56 

The amount of the Metropolitan Sewerage Loan bonds issued at 
the end of the fiscal year was $15,880,912, no additional bonds having 
been issued during the year. Of the amount issued, $15,440,912 
were sinking fund bonds, and the remainder, amounting to $440,000, 
were serial bonds. 

At the end of the year the amount of the outstanding bonds was 
$15,864,912, as bonds issued on the serial payment plan to the 
amount of $13,000 had been paid during the year. 

Of the total amount outstanding at the end of the year, $6,987,- 
000 were issued for the North Metropolitan System and $8,877,912 
for the South Metropolitan System. The Metropolitan Sewerage 
Loan Sinking Fund amounted on December 1, 1914, to $3,011,- 
512.44, of which $1,922,492.30 was on account of the North Metro- 
politan System and $1,089,020.14 was on account of the South 
Metropolitan System, an increase during the year of $263,330.11. 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 189 

. 

The net debt on December 1, 1914, was $12,853,399.56, a decrease 
of $276,330.11. 

Included in the above figures for the North Metropolitan System 
is $440,000 in serial bonds issued under chapter 512 of the Acts of 
1911, of which $13,000 has been paid. 

Maintenance. 

North Metropolitan System. 

Appropriated for the year ending November . 30, 1914, . . $209,875 00 
Receipts from pumping and from other sources, which are re- 
turned to the appropriation : — 

For the year ending November 30, 19l4, .... 377 29 



$210,252 29 



Amount approved for payment by the Board : — 

For the year ending November 30, 1914, . . . . 186,479 86 



Balance December 1, 1914, . . $23,772 43 

South Metropolitan System. 

Appropriated for the year ending November 30, 1914, . . $114,070 00 
Receipts from sales of property- and for pumping, which are 
returned to the appropriation : — 

For the year ending November 30, 1914, .... 195 30 



$114,265 30 
Amount approved for payment by the Board : — 

For the year ending November 30, 1914, .... 107,002 43 



Balance December 1, 1914, . . . . . . . $7,262 87